cream pie pt 2
Posted: 23 August 2013 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I attempted to make the coconut cream pie from the Americas Test Kitchen cookbook. someone referenced the recipe from the Baking book, which I have. But I did the one from the 2010 season, which I assume is the same recipe since I have a lot of their other books and have compared the recipes. My custard is too soft.

It seemed that it was thick enough when I prepared it, however I had the temperature for the stove lower than specified in the directions as I was worried about it scalding, and cooked it for less time than it said.  I cut out a piece today and discover it’s like sauce, and doesn’t support the topping during serving.

Boo! I think I screwed up. This is my second pie like this, first time was a lemon meringue pie (toppings egg white, this one cream but same concept - a yolky base)

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Posted: 24 August 2013 08:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Sounds like you could use a thermometer!  There are enzymes in the eggs that will liquefy the filling if you don’t get the custard hot enough to de-activate them.  I love my instant-read thermometer and use it for everything from taking the temp of the water for my morning coffee, to cooking meat, to nearly every pastry project under the sun.  I am so dependent on it that I bought a second one in case the first one fails.  It removes the guesswork and gives me a back up reading to confirm things like “custard is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon”, or, “cake springs back when touched lightly in the center”, etc.

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Posted: 24 August 2013 04:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I never thought to use a thermometer. I have one. I have a candy thermometer too. Do you know what temp the eggs need to get?

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Posted: 25 August 2013 09:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Most custards without added starch need to be brought to at least 170F to thicken/de-activate enzymes, but not go over 180F to avoid curdling.  If there’s fruit juice in the mixture (like lemon curd), the temp will be higher than that.

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