cream pie pt 2
Posted: 23 August 2013 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  26
Joined  2013-06-12

I attempted to make the coconut cream pie from the Americas Test Kitchen cookbook. someone referenced the recipe from the Baking book, which I have. But I did the one from the 2010 season, which I assume is the same recipe since I have a lot of their other books and have compared the recipes. My custard is too soft.

It seemed that it was thick enough when I prepared it, however I had the temperature for the stove lower than specified in the directions as I was worried about it scalding, and cooked it for less time than it said.  I cut out a piece today and discover it’s like sauce, and doesn’t support the topping during serving.

Boo! I think I screwed up. This is my second pie like this, first time was a lemon meringue pie (toppings egg white, this one cream but same concept - a yolky base)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 August 2013 08:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4670
Joined  2008-04-16

Sounds like you could use a thermometer!  There are enzymes in the eggs that will liquefy the filling if you don’t get the custard hot enough to de-activate them.  I love my instant-read thermometer and use it for everything from taking the temp of the water for my morning coffee, to cooking meat, to nearly every pastry project under the sun.  I am so dependent on it that I bought a second one in case the first one fails.  It removes the guesswork and gives me a back up reading to confirm things like “custard is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon”, or, “cake springs back when touched lightly in the center”, etc.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 August 2013 04:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  26
Joined  2013-06-12

I never thought to use a thermometer. I have one. I have a candy thermometer too. Do you know what temp the eggs need to get?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 August 2013 09:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4670
Joined  2008-04-16

Most custards without added starch need to be brought to at least 170F to thicken/de-activate enzymes, but not go over 180F to avoid curdling.  If there’s fruit juice in the mixture (like lemon curd), the temp will be higher than that.

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top