Color/flavor issue with “pasture-raised” eggs.
Posted: 28 August 2013 10:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi,
I have a dilemma. I’ve been trying to use better/healthier ingredients lately and got a great source for eggs. It’s sort of a friend of a friend who has just a few happy chickens and I get the fresh eggs “right out of the oven”, so to speak.
My issue though, is that when I’m making a pastry dough, white cake or even a yellow cake, the yolk color is soooo strong it makes the color of the finished product(like your All Occassion Yellow Cake) look a little off…not a pretty color. Yesterday I made tarts and the crust tasted quite eggy to me. The cake did a little too, though not quite as much.  I’ve also tried local eggs from farmers markets to see if it was just these particular eggs, but got the same results. I’d hate to go back to eggs from the “horribly-raised/fed who knows what” hens, but color and flavor are important…especially with dessert! Has anyone had this same problem? Any ideas on what I could possibly do?

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Posted: 28 August 2013 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I assume that you’re weighing the eggs before using?

Ignoring that, you may be getting a different balance between whites and yolk in your fresh eggs, so you might consider weighing them separately. If the cakes are too yellow, you might swap out some yellow for more white.

The eggy flavor of eggs is mostly concentrated in the whites, so you might verify you’re getting the right quantity.

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Posted: 28 August 2013 12:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks. I appreciate the reply.
To be honest, though I weigh most things, I have not done so with eggs and will definitely try it. Hopefully that helps out.
In the case of something like the All Occassion Yellow Cake, could I still use some whites to replace the 6 yolks? I’m not a pro and don’t quite get the science of what happens when you change from all yolks to whole eggs or whites, or a specific combination of the two. Maybe I’m just overthinking the whole thing.

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Posted: 28 August 2013 01:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Since you’re getting eggs that haven’t been standardized, weighing is much more important than from the store, where you can count on a large egg, on average, being pretty close to 50 grams.

Most recipes are pretty forgiving on the ratio of white to yellow, so I wouldn’t hesitate to swap one out for the other when there’s a reason for it. If you go to one extreme or the other, you’ll likely see some texture differences, but I don’t think any of them would be a cake disaster.

Still, if your cakes are coming out strongly orangy-yellow, I personally don’t see that as a problem, even though that’s not what we’re used to. The yellow cake recipe I use has all yolks, so I envy the eggs that you’re getting.

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Posted: 28 August 2013 10:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Because free range chickens get to eat insects and graze on plants the yolks have more color than factory eggs. I just accept the extra color as a good thing.

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Posted: 29 August 2013 07:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I also use farm-fresh eggs and local friends’ eggs, I consider them a treasure.  The larger, more deeply colored yolks are most definitely a good thing smile

I think Charles is spot on with his suggestion to weigh them, in my experience these types of eggs vary greatly not only in size, but they tend to have much larger yolks than grocery store eggs.  I make a special trip to be able to use them with any recipe that calls for only yolks, like custards or yellow cake.  It may be that all you need to do is weigh them so that you are using the right amount.

The other consideration is that the flavor of eggs reflect the diet of the chickens- I only find this to be an issue when the hens are fed a diet designed to give the eggs omega-3 oils, the flavor of flax or fish meal carries through to baked goods.  I have not found the flavor of free-range eggs to be a problem at all. 

I think the most important thing is to get the right quantity of egg by weighing them.  That should help with any eggy flavor issue.  The lovely color should be celebrated smile

If you want to swap whites/yolks/whole eggs in one of Rose’s butter cake recipes, 50g of whole egg is equal to 36g of yolks or 45g of whites (that is, one whole egg can be replaced with two yolks or 1.5 whites).

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