More about wheat germ
Posted: 09 September 2013 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I want to bake the Heart of Wheat Bread (TBB), but there is no
way to find here “fresh wheat germ”, just plain “wheat germ”,
which I suppose is toasted.
What would be the effect of using toasted wheat germ,
instead of the fresh one?
Thanks in advance,
Silvia

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Posted: 09 September 2013 03:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Silvia - 09 September 2013 12:21 PM

I want to bake the Heart of Wheat Bread (TBB), but there is no way to find here “fresh wheat germ”, just plain “wheat germ”,
which I suppose is toasted.

I would not expect something labeled “Wheat germ” to be toasted. What does it look like?

 

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Posted: 09 September 2013 10:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It looks like small light brown or yellow little bits or flakes.
One brand says it is toasted, the other say nothing.

Anyway, what would be the difference if I use the toasted?

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Posted: 09 September 2013 10:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Silvia - 09 September 2013 10:04 PM

It looks like small light brown or yellow little bits or flakes. One brand says it is toasted, the other say nothing. Anyway, what would be the difference if I use the toasted?

The flakes are probably toasted; raw wheat germ looks like very small grains of rice.

Wheat germ is there mainly for flavor; the toasted might work OK, just taste different. I’ve never tried it.

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Posted: 10 September 2013 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I bake my dog bones with Wheat Germ. I use Bob’s Red Mill. It is called “Natural Raw Wheat Germ”. It is, as you described, flakes of brown, yellow and beige. It is an excellent source of Vitamin E and adds fiber to your baked goods as well as adding whole grains to your diet.  The bag describes how to toast the wheat germ and gives recipes for it’s use.

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Posted: 10 September 2013 11:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Flour Girl - 10 September 2013 11:36 AM

It is, as you described, flakes of brown, yellow and beige.

I have the same product, but it’s little grains of rice. Does “flake” mean the same thing to you as it does to me? I imagine flakes are flat.

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Posted: 10 September 2013 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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CharlesT - 10 September 2013 11:46 AM
Flour Girl - 10 September 2013 11:36 AM

It is, as you described, flakes of brown, yellow and beige.

I have the same product, but it’s little grains of rice. Does “flake” mean the same thing to you as it does to me? I imagine flakes are flat.

Some are rod shaped and some are more square.  There is a mix of flat and less-flat flakes.  I guess it is open to interpretation.

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Posted: 12 September 2013 07:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Silvia, I have to be honest, this is one area in which I don’t follow Rose’s directions exactly.  I find that wheat germ from the jar just doesn’t taste right in bread, or at least I don’t care for it.  I have tried both toasted and untoasted, but didn’t like the flavor of either.  Adding wheat germ and bran is meant to mimic using high-extraction flour, which is available commercially but not to home bakers.  It is easy-peasy to make your own high-extraction flour at home by straining whole wheat flour through a fine strainer.  The larger bran flakes will be left in the strainer and everything else will fall through.  Instead of adding wheat germ/bran, consider using this homemade high-extraction flour for about 10% of the total flour in the recipe.

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Posted: 13 September 2013 12:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Julie, that’s very interesting. 
As I understood from the recipe, the wheat germ helps with the fermentation.
That’s why I asked if the kind of wheat germ mattered.
Still, what´s the point in using high extraction flour?

(I am going now to google “high extraction flour”)

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Posted: 13 September 2013 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Charles, the germ looks like flakes in one brand,
in the others it appears as granular, irregular bits.
It is similar to Flour Girl’s photos, but it doesn´t say
neither raw, nor toasted.

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Posted: 13 September 2013 09:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The point of using high-extraction flour is that you get some of the lovely flavor from the whole wheat, but reduce the negative qualities of the bran, i.e., bitterness and dense texture.

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