why ML = and not grams
Posted: 23 September 2013 09:30 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Can ML be converted to grams.  Isn’t ML also a volume measure?  How do you convert ML to grams? 

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Posted: 24 September 2013 01:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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ML is volume.  Grams are weight. They are not interchangeable.

You can measure the volume of the liquid in ML and then weigh it.

Or, you can always reference the gram equivalent to Rose’s chart of weights on page 2 of The Pie & Pastry Bible.

I greatly prefer when an author will give the gram weight of fluids. Measuring by volume is so subjective.

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Posted: 24 September 2013 10:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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CRenee - 23 September 2013 09:30 PM

Can ML be converted to grams.  Isn’t ML also a volume measure?  How do you convert ML to grams? 

Grams, strictly speaking, is a measurement of mass, rather than weight, but in cooking the distinction isn’t important. Just keeping the record straight.

Converting volume to mass is possible if you know the density of the substance you’re talking about; density is the mass per unit volume. Many liquids are mostly water, so you can pretend that they’re the same density as water and make the conversion with little error.

When we weigh a cup of flour, we’re essentially measuring its density, which allows us to make the conversions of volume to mass at will. You could easily make a table of the density of all the stuff you want to weigh and keep it handy in the kitchen.

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Posted: 24 September 2013 01:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Flour Girl - 24 September 2013 01:57 AM

ML is volume.  Grams are weight. They are not interchangeable.

You can measure the volume of the liquid in ML and then weigh it.

Or, you can always reference the gram equivalent to Rose’s chart of weights on page 2 of The Pie & Pastry Bible.

I greatly prefer when an author will give the gram weight of fluids. Measuring by volume is so subjective.

Thank you, Flour Girl.  I considered using Rose’s chart but I found the amount seemed incorrect when attempting to apply to someone’s recipe.

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Posted: 24 September 2013 01:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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CharlesT - 24 September 2013 10:31 AM
CRenee - 23 September 2013 09:30 PM

Can ML be converted to grams.  Isn’t ML also a volume measure?  How do you convert ML to grams? 

Grams, strictly speaking, is a measurement of mass, rather than weight, but in cooking the distinction isn’t important. Just keeping the record straight.

Converting volume to mass is possible if you know the density of the substance you’re talking about; density is the mass per unit volume. Many liquids are mostly water, so you can pretend that they’re the same density as water and make the conversion with little error.

When we weigh a cup of flour, we’re essentially measuring its density, which allows us to make the conversions of volume to mass at will. You could easily make a table of the density of all the stuff you want to weigh and keep it handy in the kitchen.

Charles, I found (via google) knowing the density was the way to go but that it looked like too much math to me.  I am not certaiin that corn syrup is the same density as water, plus I would just get a headache.  I am asking the recipe provider to tell me how many grams her 1 cup of corn syrup is supposed to be.

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Posted: 24 September 2013 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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CRenee - 24 September 2013 01:28 PM

I am not certain that corn syrup is the same density as water

No, probably not, but things like milk would be close. I usually google things like “weight of 1 cup of corn syrup”. I got this:

light corn syrup = 341 grams = 12.0 oz.
dark corn syrup = 328 grams = 11.6 oz.
high-fructose corn syrup = 310 grams = 10.9 oz.

These give you the density. For instance, light corn syrup is 341 grams / cup.

The weight of water per cup is 237 grams. The weight of milk per cup is around 240 g, so not much difference.

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Posted: 24 September 2013 04:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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CRenee - 24 September 2013 01:25 PM
Flour Girl - 24 September 2013 01:57 AM

ML is volume.  Grams are weight. They are not interchangeable.

You can measure the volume of the liquid in ML and then weigh it.

Or, you can always reference the gram equivalent to Rose’s chart of weights on page 2 of The Pie & Pastry Bible.

I greatly prefer when an author will give the gram weight of fluids. Measuring by volume is so subjective.

Thank you, Flour Girl.  I considered using Rose’s chart but I found the amount seemed incorrect when attempting to apply to someone’s recipe.

I’ve found Rose’s measurements to work perfectly for me. I hope you find what you are looking for. Good luck!

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