Rising frozen dough after the season changes to fall/winter
Posted: 26 September 2013 04:56 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2013-09-26

I’m new to bread making and thought I had perfected my bread recipe and rising.  I do the first rise in the refrigerator usually, and then freeze most of it, and the second rise from frozen in the toaster oven.  This particular batch of frozen bread was very active before freezing.  But trying to rise it now that it’s cooler out has been a miserable failure.  The dough dries out and gets a crust to it before its fully risen, yet seems too oily.  (I’ve always lightly sprayed with olive oil first.)  So now I’m not sure if its too cool, too hot (the toaster oven having to run more often to stay warm), too dry, or too moist!  It’s got to be due to to the temperature/humidity change.  I know they say to adjust the flour/water content as your making it, but what do you do when its already frozen??  Thanks for any tips/tricks… so much trial and error for a newbie.  grin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 September 2013 11:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27

I don’t freeze dough, so I can’t speak from experience, but if your dough is drying out, it may be due to a reduction in the air humidity that occurs in cooler weather, in addition to the longer rise time.

You might have better luck humidifying the air, rather than using oil. And I’m not sure that I would use a toaster oven to thaw and raise the dough. I have a hard time seeing that short bursts of intensely radiant heat is a good thing for the dough.

If I were to try this, I might be inclined to put the dough on top of a more gentle source of heat, such as a heating pad on low, and then cover the dough with a damp towel. Or cover it with plastic, but put a damp sponge on the inside.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 September 2013 01:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  640
Joined  2008-01-24

I haven’t done this from frozen either but I would bet that the dough was too active on the first rise. The yeast can run out of food. Why it was so active? I can’t say. Different yeast? Warmer in your refrigerator? Did you add sugar or less salt? It is not easy to do everything the same from batch to batch. You were successful before so something changed with this batch.hmmm

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 September 2013 01:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2013-09-26

Thanks for your responses!! Sadly it isn’t just the one batch; it’s 3 different ones in a row now. Here I’ve been making a new batch about once a week all summer long, successfully, until now. I thought the toaster oven might be part of the problem; it has a keep warm setting but I thought with the house cooler maybe it had to run too frequently, so I actually already tried my old standby of heating pad covered with a large bowl to lock the moisture in.. And still a failure. The dough is the strangest thing, it is like a teenager with a bad case of acne; both dry and oily at the same time?!  So maybe that is what I will try next, humidifying instead of oiling ??

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 September 2013 07:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  640
Joined  2008-01-24

Try thawing the frozen dough more slowly. It sounds like the outside is thawing and the yeast becomes active while the center of the dough stays frozen. Try a couple of hours at room temp before you apply heat.

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top