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Carrot Cake Recipe?
Posted: 30 November 2008 06:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Thanks for the pointer to this recipe, Jeanne! I had a request for a carrot cake last week, tried your modified Silver Palate recipe and like it a lot. This one was for a small gathering of friends, so a great chance to try the recipe in advance of a bigger order coming up next week.

This time, I halved the recipe to make 2 x 6” layers, and it worked fine except I don’t think I baked them long enough. The toothpick sure seemed to come out clean after 30 minutes. But the center of each layer sank ever so slightly on cooling, and the cake was a touch gooey in the middle on cutting. Nobody but me seemed to notice. Attaching a photo but please ignore terrible piping. Tried chilling Rose’s cream cheese/white choc bc in the piping bag for a few minutes to get a little more firmness and all I got was raggedy bc spurting out of the tip.

Loved the pecans in place of walnuts for a change, and I chopped them as you suggest. The other change I notice from the original is that your recipe doesn’t have the tablespoon of vanilla. Was it just missed in the typing or do you prefer not to use it in this cake?

Many thanks again, Carol

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Posted: 30 November 2008 11:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I probably forgot it while typing!

I’ve forgotten it when making the cake, too smile

30 mins for a 6” pan is very short; usually my 6” ones are ready in about 40 mins.  The cake will start to pull away from the sides - not dramatically as if it were overbaked (which can happen too), but you can see it.

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Posted: 01 December 2008 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Carol - your piping isn’t bad, really!  (we’ve all made that mistake at one time or another)
How did you make the 3 hexagon shapes on top of the cake?

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Posted: 14 December 2008 05:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Hi Patricia! Sorry, I didn’t see your question until just now. For some reason, the email notification didn’t happen. Glad I happened to check back on this thread.

Can’t take credit for the hex shape. When I need a good quality chocolate, I often buy Lindt couverture wafers. That’s how they come. They have several dark and milk choc versions as well as the white. Every now and then, I try another brand, but usually come back to Lindt. Decent price, wonderful flavor, consistent in every respect.

This cake was for a group of friends, three of whom were celebrating long-term anniversaries of quitting smoking. I was one of them! 10 years ago, November 30th. Was inspired at the last minute to use 3 of the wafers on top of the cake, sort of like us getting medals. The rest of the group had to content themselves with getting their chocolate only in the cream cheese buttercream. smile

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Posted: 15 December 2008 10:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Carol - 14 December 2008 09:58 PM

This cake was for a group of friends, three of whom were celebrating long-term anniversaries of quitting smoking. I was one of them! 10 years ago, November 30th.

Congratulations Carol! You definitely deserve that medal.

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Posted: 15 December 2008 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Yes, Congratulations Carol!

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Posted: 10 November 2009 07:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Patrincia - 19 November 2008 01:17 AM

I once didn’t peel the carrots for my chicken stock, thinking they would contribute more flavor/nutrition, but my stock actually ended up tasting somewhat bitter.  Won’t make that mistake ever again.

Oh really? I was about to do the same ting because i also believe not peeling them would be more nutritious. Thanks for the tip…

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Posted: 10 November 2009 09:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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farrahdews - 10 November 2009 11:09 AM
Patrincia - 19 November 2008 01:17 AM

I once didn’t peel the carrots for my chicken stock, thinking they would contribute more flavor/nutrition, but my stock actually ended up tasting somewhat bitter.  Won’t make that mistake ever again.

Oh really? I was about to do the same ting because i also believe not peeling them would be more nutritious. Thanks for the tip…

Regards,
farrahdews
Disque dur multimedia

I should mention that I use bagged carrots.  I don’t know how fresh “green top” carrots would be unpeeled - probably a lot better than the bagged variety.

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Posted: 10 November 2009 07:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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CARROT TRIVIA:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the following nutrient content descriptors for carrots: fat free, saturated fat free, low-sodium, cholesterol-free, a good source of fiber and high in vitamin A.

Carrots are nutritional goldmines of SEVERAL VITAMINS AND MINERALS, treasure troves of carotene in particular.  No other fruit or vegetable is known to contain as much carotene as carrots (which your body biochemically converts to vitamin A, see THIS LINK FOR Vit A functions in the body ). This is a great low-calorie vegetable and an excellent source of vitamins B and C as well as calcium pectate, an extraordinary pectin fiber that has been found to have cholesterol-lowering properties.  Carrots are basically roots that contain 87% water, are rich in many minerals, and when eaten raw are also natural sources of vitamins A and potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B6, thiamine, folic acid, and magnesium.  Even when cooked, carrots provide an excellent source of vitamin A, potassium, and contain decent amounts of vitamin B6, copper, folic acid, and magnesium. The high level of beta-carotene is very important as the Vitamin A source and is the natural substance that gives carrots their distinctive orange color.

Carrots also contain, in smaller amounts, essential oils, carbohydrates and nitrogenous composites. They are well-known for their sweetening, antianemic, wound healing, diuretic, and mild sedative properties. Although it may seem counterintuitive, in order to assimilate the greatest quantity of the nutrients present in carrots, it is important to chew them well, AND they are the exception to the ?COOKED-VS.-FRESH? rule : they are more nutritious cooked than raw. Why is this? Click THIS LINK FOR MORE INFO ON COOKED NUTRIENTS IN CARROTS

Also most of the goodness is actually in, or just below the skin. Carrots are one of the best sources of carotene which is a strong antioxidant, but carrots also contain other phenolic compounds that are antioxidants. Many people do not realize that numerous phenolic compounds are located in the skin of fruit and vegetables, many of which are removed by peeling prior to processing. The real trick about carrots though is that less than10% of the nutritional value of the carrot is available if it is eaten whole or in large pieces.  In order for our bodies to be able to assimilate the nutritional content, they must be either fully chewed or juiced before consumption.  With this in mind, using the carrot puree is the most nutritious form of the carrot based on what we actually can assimilate from the root.  Whether it is fresh, raw, or pureed whole will boil down to (Heh! No pun intended) consumption, and with the whole skin and all. The carrot puree is reported by some to tend to have a bitter taste, especially with older/larger carrots.  I personally have not found this to be the case and after a good scrub with a vegetable brush, I cut off the greens or the stump and puree the whole scrubbed carrot,  with young carrots I don’t find any bitterness, especially when spiced with nutmeg and cinnamon, etc.  Maybe it’s just me, but I think the whole carrot puree adds a more robust flavor to the cake.

For those of you that take blood thinners, the greens of the carrot are edible, but contain large amounts of Vitamin K, consider them as you would spinach or other dark greens in your diet (to be avoided unless they have been a regular part of your diet and your Coumadin dose has been adjusted while consuming these greens).  Vitamin K is NOT found in significant amounts in the carrot root itself, so they will be OK to consume while taking Coumadin.

I bet you all feel like a round of Trivial Pursuits now?  cool smile

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Posted: 15 July 2011 01:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Hi Jeanne,

I just read about the silver palate carrot cake you recommend.  When you cover the cake with fondant, do you still put the traditional cream cheese frosting (cream cheese, butter and powdered sugar) inside the cake? How long does the cream cheese frosting remain alright without refrigeration?

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Posted: 16 July 2011 11:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Usually people are combining flavors so carrot would be one tier, and some other flavors for the remaining tiers. Although I torte regular butter cakes (I bake in 2” high pans) and create a tier that has three layers of cake and two layers of filling; for carrot cake, I don’t torte it.  It’s two 2” high (approximately) layers with one layer of cream cheese icing for the filling.

I use buttercream on the outside of the carrot cake, because the cream cheese frosting will crust, and then fondant won’t stick to a crusting type of buttercream.  Even with a buttercream finish for the design, I’ll use the meringue buttercream for the outside to keep it the same as the other tiers.  I’ve tried adding cream cheese to meringue buttercream and it’s not a good idea smile  I haven’t tried the recipes from Heavenly Cakes for cream cheese frosting.  Usually I find cream cheese frostings to be somewhat opaque (and this carrot cake is dark so I always think I see the shadow of the cake under it) so it needs more coats if you want to use it.  Some bakers will apply chopped nuts or shaved chocolate to the sides but that’s not always a possibility with a wedding cake.

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Posted: 16 July 2011 11:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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How long cream cheese frosting can stay out without refrigeration is going to depend on the temperature of the room it’s in; I know some cupcake shops will leave a cream cheese frosted cupcake out for an entire day in their display cases; with air conditioning it shouldn’t be a problem for a day. But again, you can put a fondant covered cake in the refrigerator if you can box it up, then wrap the box in plastic or put it in a large plastic bag….

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