“Diluting” chocolate with cocoa butter
Posted: 25 October 2013 01:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi, all!

Okay, so, if you take dark chocolate and add more sugar to, say, your cream (if making ganache), you can make the chocolate sweeter and “less dark.”  It’s an easy way to save some money on chocolate, since sugar is cheaper than chocolate.

However, what about adding cocoa butter?

Here, I’m looking at dipping chocolate.  I know 1/2 t. per oz of chocolate (1T per 6 oz) is supposed to make a better dipping consistency (based on how lots of recipes call for this much shortening—- ecch—- to be added to dipping chocolate).  However, if I added more than that to a chocolate that is darker than I need, does it make the chocolate also “less dark.” 

I feel I’m answering my question as I write, becuase it DOES make it “less dark,” but it doesn’t make it “more sweet,” which may just make a “fatty,” as opposed to “watery,” dilution.

I wonder if I melted sugar, then added cocoa butter, then chocolate, if I could dilute and sweeten it, or if the water from the sugar woould cause the chocolate to sieze?

I’m just sort of rolling this around.  I have lots of very dark chocolate, becuase I was going to make truffles.  Now I’m dipping other items, instead, so I wasn’t sure if I could still use it (other than to darken “too light” milk chocolate or mix it with low % dark chocolate and get a happy medium).

Thoughts on the manu uses of cocoa butter (excluding that cake coating that Rose makes, becuase I already know about that) would be super helpful!

Thanks!

—ak

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Posted: 25 October 2013 05:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I think the normal meaning of “dark” is “not milk”, rather than the amount of sugar or cocoa butter. Increasing any other ingredient in the recipe would make the flavor less intense, but I suppose that only milk would make it less dark. I’d say that adding cocoa butter would be the most expensive way to dilute the flavor; if you wanted more fat, I’d probably choose butter. Or shortening if I wanted a firmer consistency.

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Posted: 25 October 2013 05:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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CharlesT - 25 October 2013 05:08 PM

if you wanted more fat, I’d probably choose butter. Or shortening if I wanted a firmer consistency.

But probably not for dipping though, unless it doesn’t need to be tempered.

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Posted: 25 October 2013 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks, CT!

Oh, yes, I’m tempering for dipping.  Snap!!!

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Posted: 25 October 2013 05:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Anne in NC - 25 October 2013 05:25 PM

Thanks, CT!

Oh, yes, I’m tempering for dipping.  Snap!!!


It would be interesting to know what a small amount of butter would do to that.

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Posted: 25 October 2013 08:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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By adding cocoa butter to chocolate you’re essentially making couverture, which is a chocolate with a higher cocoa butter content that is especially good for dipping (coats more thinly).  Couverture is also yummy to eat, I don’t buy it anymore for that reason, too tempting.

Adding cocoa butter won’t make the chocolate less dark, but all else held equal, a chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa butter will often have a milder, rounder flavor than one with a lower percentage of cocoa butter.

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Posted: 25 October 2013 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thank you, Julie!

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Posted: 25 October 2013 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Anne in NC - 25 October 2013 01:17 PM

Hi, all!

Okay, so, if you take dark chocolate and add more sugar to, say, your cream (if making ganache), you can make the chocolate sweeter and “less dark.”  It’s an easy way to save some money on chocolate, since sugar is cheaper than chocolate.

However, what about adding cocoa butter?

Here, I’m looking at dipping chocolate.  I know 1/2 t. per oz of chocolate (1T per 6 oz) is supposed to make a better dipping consistency (based on how lots of recipes call for this much shortening—- ecch—- to be added to dipping chocolate).  However, if I added more than that to a chocolate that is darker than I need, does it make the chocolate also “less dark.” 

I feel I’m answering my question as I write, becuase it DOES make it “less dark,” but it doesn’t make it “more sweet,” which may just make a “fatty,” as opposed to “watery,” dilution.

I wonder if I melted sugar, then added cocoa butter, then chocolate, if I could dilute and sweeten it, or if the water from the sugar woould cause the chocolate to sieze?

I’m just sort of rolling this around.  I have lots of very dark chocolate, becuase I was going to make truffles.  Now I’m dipping other items, instead, so I wasn’t sure if I could still use it (other than to darken “too light” milk chocolate or mix it with low % dark chocolate and get a happy medium).

Thoughts on the manu uses of cocoa butter (excluding that cake coating that Rose makes, becuase I already know about that) would be super helpful!

Thanks!

—ak

Hi Anne,
How about just adding condensed milk ? Just to make it a bit more simple and fast. This is what I do when I have fruit fondue to offer to some guests that are just dropping by quickly. Jmho.

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Posted: 25 October 2013 10:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks, PC—I wasn’t clear about my dipping.  I want to dip as in dipping candy or truffles—so it dries hard—rather than fondue-style dipping.  But that’s a great fondue tip!!

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Posted: 26 October 2013 02:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Anne in NC - 25 October 2013 10:23 PM

Thanks, PC—I wasn’t clear about my dipping.  I want to dip as in dipping candy or truffles—so it dries hard—rather than fondue-style dipping.  But that’s a great fondue tip!!

How are you melting the sugar? Like making caramel ? Not sure if powdered sugar or granulated will dissolve when added to melted chocolate. Will it come out like fudge icing ?

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Posted: 26 October 2013 03:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I think I have decided to bag this.  Essentially, I was wondering if an unsweetened bar of baking chocolate can be transformed—with more sugar and coca butter—into two 50% chocolate bars (or whatever).  But I’m just going to dip into my freezer stash of lower % (60%-70%) chocolate for dipping.  I’ll avae my darker stuff for ganache!

Loved the ideas and thoughts, though!

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