2 of 3
2
Preheating
Posted: 26 October 2013 03:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 26 October 2013 02:50 PM

I noticed the Gold Touch pans do darken the edges more than my Magic Line. I bake every day. The only hint of over-baking occurred when I baked Baked’s Oatmeal Cake the other day.

I have the Gold Touch pans and haven’t noticed a particular problem with overbrowning; Cook’s Illustrated thinks the Gold Touch pans are about perfect in that regard.

Easiest thing to try is to wrap the pan in aluminum foil, or maybe set the pans on an aluminum sheet pan.

I didn’t care about the skin (I don’t eat it

I don’t eat it unless it’s crispy, then it’s hard to resist. I’ve known people that eat the soggy skin and that grosses me out.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 October 2013 04:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
prettycake - 26 October 2013 03:11 PM

Hi FG, yes heating core can be used with loaves. I think that’s when you will need it the most considering how deep the pan is. I always bake with a heating core because I like tall cakes.

Interesting Prettycake. I actually have an unopened package of ATECO HEATING CORES. I’ll try them. Thank you grin

This cake is less than 3 inches tall. It rose very well which brings me back to the pan being too hot.

Which baking pans do you use?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 October 2013 04:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 26 October 2013 03:18 PM
Flour Girl - 26 October 2013 02:50 PM

I noticed the Gold Touch pans do darken the edges more than my Magic Line. I bake every day. The only hint of over-baking occurred when I baked Baked’s Oatmeal Cake the other day.

I have the Gold Touch pans and haven’t noticed a particular problem with overbrowning; Cook’s Illustrated thinks the Gold Touch pans are about perfect in that regard.

Easiest thing to try is to wrap the pan in aluminum foil, or maybe set the pans on an aluminum sheet pan.

Cook’s illustrated dislikes all light colored baking pans. They think the end result is anemic. Gold Touch is definitely an excellent pan. I only have the one-pound size because I don’t use coated pans if I have a choice. Placing a baking sheet under the pan is a great idea. 

I think I am going to get the pan I showed you. Even if I continue to use the Gold Touch, I don’t like the Chicago Metallic dark pan I already own and need a replacement anyway. If the CM aluminum pan doesn’t perform to expectations, I’ll get another Gold Touch.

I don’t eat it unless it’s crispy, then it’s hard to resist. I’ve known people that eat the soggy skin and that grosses me out.

LOL

One question: Is uncoated aluminized steel comparable to Magic Line?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 October 2013 07:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 26 October 2013 04:23 PM

One question: Is uncoated aluminized steel comparable to Magic Line?

No, I’ve had poor luck with that stuff. I’m sure it bakes fine, but it will rust if you leave it in contact with water for extended periods. I think it’s like a thin coating of aluminum over carbon steel. I had several pieces from WS that I ended up throwing away.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 October 2013 07:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 26 October 2013 07:26 PM
Flour Girl - 26 October 2013 04:23 PM

One question: Is uncoated aluminized steel comparable to Magic Line?

No, I’ve had poor luck with that stuff. I’m sure it bakes fine, but it will rust if you leave it in contact with water for extended periods. I think it’s like a thin coating of aluminum over carbon steel. I had several pieces from WS that I ended up throwing away.

Thank you.

I’m sure you are right about the pan getting too hot. I tested the oven this afternoon. The lower element turned off exactly when the oven indicated it was preheated ( which we all know is nowhere near the required temperature ) . The 3 thermometers inside the oven were consistent . I cut deeper into the loaf and it was less dry than the slices closer to the heel of the loaf.

Now I have to find a new pan.

Thank you Charles. I so appreciate your help grin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 26 October 2013 07:26 PM
Flour Girl - 26 October 2013 04:23 PM

One question: Is uncoated aluminized steel comparable to Magic Line?

No, I’ve had poor luck with that stuff. I’m sure it bakes fine, but it will rust if you leave it in contact with water for extended periods. I think it’s like a thin coating of aluminum over carbon steel. I had several pieces from WS that I ended up throwing away.

I found pans I am excited about.

It seems Chicago Metallic sold a portion of their business. That portion also goes by the name of CM. However, their products largely are produced in China and are for home cooks.

The original company producers their products in the US and is a commercial/industrial line.

The original CM can be found HERE

I learned the original company produces the Gold Touch line sold by WIlliams Sonoma.

I bought two 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 plain (uncoated) loaf pans.

This company does not sell directly to consumers. But, they will provide a list of the distributors who will.

I found one on their list who will sell individual pieces.

I just thought you might like to know.

Thanks Charles grin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 12:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 11:58 AM

The original CM can be found

You know Parrish makes some larger loaf pans?

http://www.amazon.com/Parrish-Magic-Line-Inch-Loaf/dp/B001TH8YRY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=2D4EBVPQNH7A3&coliid=I2V1X86UTVVTTB

I’ve had that one in my wish list for a while; it’s appealing to be able to make full-size loaves, but realistically, I have a hard time eating even the small loaves.

If you didn’t want the shiny steel, you could always spray paint the exterior with a high temp gray paint. I painted black the pan I used to cover my bread while baking in order to make it heat up faster.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 02:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17

You know Parrish makes some larger loaf pans?

http://www.amazon.com/Parrish-Magic-Line-Inch-Loaf/dp/B001TH8YRY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=2D4EBVPQNH7A3&coliid=I2V1X86UTVVTTB

Ooooo, that’s nice!

I knew Magic Line had larger sizes. I have 3 of their 9x5. I would love the 16x4. I have a marble cake recipe calling for a pullman. It would be perfect for that pan.

I was looking for an unglazed 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 pan. Magic line doesn’t make that size. They make a 7 1/2 x 3 1/2. I actually have one of those and it is too small for the pound cake recipe.

If you didn’t want the shiny steel, you could always spray paint the exterior with a high temp gray paint. I painted black the pan I used to cover my bread while baking in order to make it heat up faster.

I do want the shiny. I don’t want the coating or the dark color. The gold of the WS pan absorbed too much heat, as you noted. That has never happened with the Magic Line. The pans I recently ordered from Chicago Metallic are light and uncoated. But it’s good to know spray painting is an option in case I ever need a dark pan. Thanx!!

The pans I ordered are, though, Aluminized Steel but so is the WS Gold Touch line.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 02:02 PM

The pans I ordered are, though, Aluminized Steel but so is the WS Gold Touch line.

My assumption for the GT was that the coating helped protect the carbon steel from rusting, which the aluminum alone appears unable to do. From what I can tell, it does.

FWIW, I didn’t mean to implicate the GT pans for your browning problem; given everyone else’s success with those pans, including my own, I don’t think that’s likely. I think you have some other problem going on.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 02:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 30 October 2013 02:18 PM
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 02:02 PM

The pans I ordered are, though, Aluminized Steel but so is the WS Gold Touch line.

My assumption for the GT was that the coating helped protect the carbon steel from rusting, which the aluminum alone appears unable to do. From what I can tell, it does.

FWIW, I didn’t mean to implicate the GT pans for your browning problem; given everyone else’s success with those pans, including my own, I don’t think that’s likely. I think you have some other problem going on.

I have been looking for an uncoated one-pound loaf pan for a while.

I actually returned one GT a few months ago. I bought an extra pan when I visited WS because I needed 2 pans. I found my loaf was baking too dark and returned the recently purchased pan for that reason. I was only able to return the new pan because the older pan had exceeded its time limit. I initially did not notice the dark color end result. But I did take notice recently.

I don’t think it is my oven though.  Below is a cake I just un-molded.  I baked it in Magic Line and , to me, it is perfect.

The recipe is Any Day All-Occassion Snack Cake. It is in Flo Braker’s Baking For All Occasions.

Image Attachments
php23tbMzAM.jpgphpaWKbs6AM.jpgphpOaJmdaAM.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 03:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 02:41 PM

I don’t think it is my oven though.  Below is a cake I just un-molded.  I baked it in Magic Line and , to me, it is perfect.

For instance, if your bottom coils are coming on too often or staying on too long, it would tend to move all pans towards the darker end of the scale because of the radiant heat on the pans. This would be consistent with the evidence we see.

I had this problem (I think) in my old oven; my breads would often be burned on the bottom. I started removing them halfway and putting them on a cooling rack, then back on top of the pizza stone to complete baking. In my new ovens, this isn’t necessary.

I have two possible hypotheses as to what was happening. 1) the oven leaked hot air and the bottom coils stayed on a long time, or 2) the age of the coils made some portions of them hotter than others (they were splotchy red), and thus they had to stay on a long time. So I had greater intensity in certain spots for a longer period of time.

If you had an infrared thermometer, it would be interesting to take some readings off the dark pans.

 

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 30 October 2013 03:02 PM
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 02:41 PM

I don’t think it is my oven though.  Below is a cake I just un-molded.  I baked it in Magic Line and , to me, it is perfect.

For instance, if your bottom coils are coming on too often or staying on too long, it would tend to move all pans towards the darker end of the scale because of the radiant heat on the pans. This would be consistent with the evidence we see.

I had this problem (I think) in my old oven; my breads would often be burned on the bottom. I started removing them halfway and putting them on a cooling rack, then back on top of the pizza stone to complete baking. In my new ovens, this isn’t necessary.

I have two possible hypotheses as to what was happening. 1) the oven leaked hot air and the bottom coils stayed on a long time, or 2) the age of the coils made some portions of them hotter than others (they were splotchy red), and thus they had to stay on a long time. So I had greater intensity in certain spots for a longer period of time.

If you had an infrared thermometer, it would be interesting to take some readings off the dark pans.

I will take readings if I use the GT again.  Good idea!

Charles, look at these pictures. This is a picture of the second loaf of Pound Cake I made the other day. My husband and son ate the first loaf. Look at the burn patterns. They are above the rim. You are so right! I think it was the heat from the rim and, as FRESHKID said, the excessive sugar exposed to the heat of the oven. 

I had this problem (I think) in my old oven; my breads would often be burned on the bottom. I started removing them halfway and putting them on a cooling rack, then back on top of the pizza stone to complete baking. In my new ovens, this isn’t necessary.

I have two possible hypotheses as to what was happening. 1) the oven leaked hot air and the bottom coils stayed on a long time, or 2) the age of the coils made some portions of them hotter than others (they were splotchy red), and thus they had to stay on a long time. So I had greater intensity in certain spots for a longer period of time.

If your hypothesis was correct, shouldn’t the cake I baked this morning have had similar burn marks?

 

Image Attachments
phpLfwIenPM.jpgphpDnz5WuPM.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 04:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17

Just wondering, could the pan be protective?

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 05:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 04:57 PM

If your hypothesis was correct, shouldn’t the cake I baked this morning have had similar burn marks?

Just wondering, could the pan be protective?

If the radiant heat was the problem, then the shiny pan would be protective.

However, looking at these new pictures, the sides of the cake look ok; the first photos you had made them seem very dark. They might be browner than your liking, but within the “normal” range. The tops, though are what seem rather burned, but only near the pan edges.

I wonder if, when you used the full recipe, the ingredients weren’t as thoroughly mixed? While sugar increases the browning effect, I would expect it to be relatively uniform.

And what did you use to grease the pan?

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2013 05:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1652
Joined  2011-02-17
CharlesT - 30 October 2013 05:07 PM
Flour Girl - 30 October 2013 04:57 PM

If your hypothesis was correct, shouldn’t the cake I baked this morning have had similar burn marks?

Just wondering, could the pan be protective?

If the radiant heat was the problem, then the shiny pan would be protective.

However, looking at these new pictures, the sides of the cake look ok; the first photos you had made them seem very dark. They might be browner than your liking, but within the “normal” range. The tops, though are what seem rather burned, but only near the pan edges.

I wonder if, when you used the full recipe, the ingredients weren’t as thoroughly mixed? While sugar increases the browning effect, I would expect it to be relatively uniform.

And what did you use to grease the pan?

I used spectrum organic shortening and flour, as always.

This loaf was baked in the GT. The first loaf was baked in a Chicago Metallic Professional pan. It is dark and is the one recommended by Rose in RHC.  I only have one GT pan now since I returned one.

I might have had a problem with mixing though. The flour had to be mixed by hand and I broke my right arm.

Do you think that was the issue? That’s going to be harder to fix than getting a new pan wink

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 3
2
Back to top