crunch buttercream similar to creme brûlée! 
Posted: 02 November 2013 04:36 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello there.. there is this Lindt creme brûlée chocolate you get where i live and i absolutely adore the filling. its basically a white creme with lil shards of the crispy caramelised sugar. sweet with a slight bitter edge to it. Just wanted to try and replicate that. Has anyone tried TCB praline crunch buttercream? i know that it contains nuts but I’m curious as to how long the crunch will remain crunchy so to speak =) If i use caramelised sugar and smash it up and add it to a vanilla silk meringue or mousseline. do you reckon it will stay without melting off into lil puddles of caramelised sugar? =D

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Posted: 02 November 2013 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It will eventually melt, it may take two to three days if you use something like Skor or Heath bar (commercially made “toffee”) but if you use your own caramelized sugar pulverized into bits it will melt sooner.  The caramel pulls moisture from the buttercream and melts.  You can approximate something like this using feuilletine, which is thin, almost impossibly thin shards of something along the lines of a crispy crepe.  I am not sure you could make this stuff, I always buy it from a distributor.  Or online at pastrychefcentral.com maybe.  You could mix this into the buttercream and it will stay crispy for longer than the pulverized caramel; but for all that aggravation maybe just use your favorite toffee recipe (minus a chocolate coating) and see how long that lasts in the buttercream.

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Posted: 03 November 2013 03:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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unfortunately don’t get skor or heath bar over here. the closest would be ac hocolaye called daim but even that is covered in chocolate =/  similar to almond roca . I do have feuilletine but i was looking to imitate the sweetness and slight bitterness of the creme brûlée brûlée part =D . i wonder how the lindt manufacturers manage to make it stay crisp ? Do you reckon coating it in thin layer of oil will work? like a quick spray? oR will that make it dissolve faster? =/

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Posted: 03 November 2013 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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If you make a dry caramel and coat it with a thin layer of cocoa butter before you crush it, that will help it stay crunchy. If you take the time to sift out the really fine powder and only use the bigger pieces (like the size of rolled oats) that will also help the crunch factor. hth!
IMHO, the bits in the Lindt filling stay that way because there isn’t a lot of moisture (ie water-based) for the caramel to absorb; whereas in buttercream you have all the moisture from the water content of the butter. Partially waterproofing the caramel with cocoa butter would help that.

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Posted: 03 November 2013 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Reenicake and Jeanne , thank you so much!!  =) I do like the idea of coating the caramel with cocoa butter because i do have a block of that sitting around which i never got around to use and this would be as good a use as any to test it out on =) So in short , make a dry caramel break it up. Sift out the dust , and then melt cocoa butter and let it cool slightly and then toss the caramel bits in that right? And then add that to the buttercream. Sound right? =)

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Posted: 03 November 2013 09:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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About right, yes! but test, test and taste test again. :D I had thought coating the caramel before crushing, but your idea of coating the bits will probably work better and ensure a more even coverage.

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Posted: 04 November 2013 04:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Agree that coating the bits after smashing them will enrobe them and give you a better “seal” against the moisture in the buttercream….. have fun! let us know how it turns out smile!

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