White chocolate whisper cake
Posted: 19 December 2013 12:50 AM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2013-12-19

Hi
I was trying the white chocolate whisper cake from Roses’s heavenly cakes today with a slight modification. Instead of the 9in pans suggested, I used 10in round pans instead. The cakes unfortunately did not bake as expected, they were underdone at the bottom and did not rise as much. I have made this recipe in the past modifying it for 6in round pans ( basically made 1/2 the recipe) and it worked out great. This was the first time I tried the recipe as is mentioned in the book. Is there a problem when I bake it in larger pans? Or is there some modification I need to do? Any help would be greatly appreciated as I absolutely love the flavor of this cake, and would like to bake the larger one successfully.
Thanks!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 December 2013 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  611
Joined  2007-11-18
K lobo - 19 December 2013 12:50 AM

Hi
I was trying the white chocolate whisper cake from Roses’s heavenly cakes today with a slight modification. Instead of the 9in pans suggested, I used 10in round pans instead. The cakes unfortunately did not bake as expected, they were underdone at the bottom and did not rise as much. I have made this recipe in the past modifying it for 6in round pans ( basically made 1/2 the recipe) and it worked out great. This was the first time I tried the recipe as is mentioned in the book. Is there a problem when I bake it in larger pans? Or is there some modification I need to do? Any help would be greatly appreciated as I absolutely love the flavor of this cake, and would like to bake the larger one successfully.
Thanks!

K LOBO:
  Good morning. First off, the recipe you wrote about is located in RLB’s book “THE CAKE BIBLE.
You didn’t mention if your 10, in round pans are the 1.5, or the 2 inch high pans.question You didn’t say whether or not you increased the recipe to accomodate the increased sized pans. Did you employ one pan or two. Miss Rose employed 2, 9, in pans. If so by how much. This information is important if any of us can ascertain why your baking attempt sustained a baking disappointment. If I allowed myself to speculate without having any of the information I would say there is a chemical leavener problem here.

  Tell then enjoy the day.

  ~FRESHKID..

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 December 2013 11:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2013-12-19

Hi ~Freshkid,
The recipe is also in Roses Heavenly Cakes and that’s the one I used with those quantities. The same one in The Cake Bible is a scaled down version of the recipe.
I used 3in high pans that were 10in round pans. I have read on another post that her cakes don’t work with 3in high pans, but I had scaled down the recipe and baked them in 6in round pans that were 3in high with no problems at all.


I used the exact recipe with the measurements mentioned, the only change I did was to bake them in two 10in pans that were 3in high, instead of the 9in pans she mentions.
Should I reduce the baking powder if I increase the pan size for the same amount of batter?

Curious to know what the problem was when I stuck with the exact measurements as mentioned in the recipe….

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 December 2013 11:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27

The sides of a pan provide some structural support for a cake. When the sides move a further distance away from parts of the cake batter, there is less structural support for the cake towards the center and it may fall. You can increase the structural support in a number of ways. A heating core would probably help, or you can use a stronger flour. But the easiest solution is the use less baking powder, because the carbon dioxide bubbles in the cake weaken its structure.

The raw bottoms are more of a puzzle; the 10” cake would surely take longer to bake, but I would expect the very bottom to be done quickly, and only the interior to be raw. Again, if the latter is the case, a heating core or flower nail will help with that.

If there was a whole layer underdone at the bottom, my understanding is that the failure to use bleached flour often produces an effect that looks like that.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 December 2013 12:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2013-12-19

Yes, actually the cake looked like the underside was raw, and on top it looked done. Will recheck the flour and see what kind it was.
I also make my own cake flour at home, substituting every 2tbsp of flour for 2 tbsp of cornstarch, for every cup of flour. I whisk them together and then sift them 4 times. Would that be a factor in the undercooking of the cake?
Thanks!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 December 2013 12:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
K lobo - 20 December 2013 12:45 AM

I also make my own cake flour at home, substituting every 2tbsp of flour for 2 tbsp of cornstarch, for every cup of flour. I whisk them together and then sift them 4 times. Would that be a factor in the undercooking of the cake?

It could be. That will lower the protein content, but it wouldn’t necessarily fixed the bleached part of cake flour if you were using unbleached flour.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top