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My Quest:Finding The Jewish Honey Cake I Remember
Posted: 09 January 2014 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I am on a quest to find the honey cake of my childhood.  The honey cake I grew-up on was a deep amber color and was sticky on the outside. The top was adorned with almond slices.

I made the Honey Cake from Inside The Jewish Bakery. It was good but it didn’t have the gooey-stickiness I remember honey cakes have. The crust was dry. The taste was good. The recipe uses a pound of honey and you can feel it as you eat it.

Then I made Sister Sadie’s Rosh Hashanah Honey Cake from Southern Cakes. It was good but developed a gumminess under the top crust and did not have the gooey-sticky feature I am looking for.

Yesterday I baked Marcy Goldman’s honey cake in A Treasury Of Jewish Holiday Baking This one was the best tasting, to me, but still not what I remember I had as a child.

Does anyone know of such a recipe and where I can find it? My uncle will turn 94 in February. He lives in a nursing home. I know he will be thrilled to get a few loaves of the cake we grew-up eating.

Thank you.

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Posted: 11 January 2014 12:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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All Things Come To Those Who Wait

So true.

The honey cake by Marcy Goldman is definitely the winner. With time, the sticky-gooey deliciousness of the honey can be felt and tasted in the crust.

This recipe is a keeper.


In her book, A Treasury Of Jewish Holiday Baking there are several Honey Cake recipes, including a chocolate honey cake. The Passover Honey Cake includes a soaking syrup.  They all sound easily do-able.

Many of the cakes in this book are or can be oil cakes.

I didn’t have this book when I first made Marcy’s Honey Cake. This is truly a treasury. There are lots of recipes I plan to make.

Rose discusses this book on her blog HERE

 

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Posted: 20 January 2014 06:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I went to Pinterest and I saw a lot of the cake that u are looking for. I am not Jewish so I really do not know what to look for, but they all look good. I hope u will find it.

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Posted: 21 January 2014 07:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you Prettycake! I really appreciate that!

I did find a cake I like. It is Marcy Goldman’s New Years Cake. I changed the mixing instructions to Rose’s technique used in RHC Many Splendid Quick Bread. The loaves turned out much better with a much better texture than the original mixing instructions.

I’ve been experimenting and have been eating Honey Cake every night for the past 2 weeks. I shipped his loaves today because he has been craving Honey Cake. I will be working on finding a good sponge cake (Jewish version ) and send it to him for his birthday next month.

Thank you very much grin

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Posted: 22 January 2014 01:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hi Dear flourgirl,

I need to find a good looking, fun and challenging recipe for the sponge cake. I found one for you here that I thought looked really

good.  I meant to grab some cookbooks to read while watching the little grandma tonight but somehow managed to drive off without them :(...

Have you found any that look good to you yet? There are a million different kinds out there but I have until Sunday to decide. What fun it is!!

I look forward to trying the ‘wrapping around the cake with a damp towel method’. Always thought that would be a bit challenging. I’ll keep looking and let me know what you are up to.

Work has been crazy busy plus I got my anniversary gift this morning. I chose a DeLonghi toaster oven with the Panini. I can’t wait to give that a go.

Good luck finding the perfect cake for your uncle. He’s lucky to have you. wink

Abbey

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Posted: 22 January 2014 02:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hey Flour Girl!

I’m so happy for you that you managed to find the cake you were looking for! There are not a lot of things better in life than putting a smile on a beloved one’s face.  I’m sure your uncle is gleaming with delight.

If you need any help finding the sponge cake, I could try looking in some of my mom’s old recipe books. Much of the baking in Israel in its early years was heavily influenced by european baking, and sponge cakes are really popular here (and there)!

Good luck!

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Posted: 23 January 2014 12:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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abbey - 22 January 2014 01:17 PM

Hi Dear flourgirl,

I need to find a good looking, fun and challenging recipe for the sponge cake. I found one for you here that I thought looked really

good.  I meant to grab some cookbooks to read while watching the little grandma tonight but somehow managed to drive off without them :(...

Have you found any that look good to you yet? There are a million different kinds out there but I have until Sunday to decide. What fun it is!!

I look forward to trying the ‘wrapping around the cake with a damp towel method’. Always thought that would be a bit challenging. I’ll keep looking and let me know what you are up to.

Work has been crazy busy plus I got my anniversary gift this morning. I chose a DeLonghi toaster oven with the Panini. I can’t wait to give that a go.

Good luck finding the perfect cake for your uncle. He’s lucky to have you. wink

Abbey

Hi Abbey,

That sponge cake looks delicious!  Are you planing on baking that one?  What is the wrapping-around-the-cake method? I never heard of it before.

Thank you for researching sponge cakes for me. That was so sweet of you!

Happy Anniversary! What a cool gift! What is your favorite panini sandwich?

I haven’t begun my search for a sponge cake yet. I have 4 Jewish baking books. Probably, my first choice will be Inside The Jewish Bakery.  I have baked their apple cake numerous times. It’s an amazing cake. I’m not sure but the cake part might be a sponge cake.

I’m glad to know you got to spend time with your Grandma. Did she get a piece of your galette?  How did everyone at work like it?  I guess being busy can be a good thing. It always made my day go faster. I hope you are not over-worked or stressed.

Have a good evening Abbey and thank you again.

 

 

 

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Posted: 23 January 2014 01:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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McBrownie - 22 January 2014 02:27 PM

Hey Flour Girl!

I’m so happy for you that you managed to find the cake you were looking for! There are not a lot of things better in life than putting a smile on a beloved one’s face.  I’m sure your uncle is gleaming with delight.

If you need any help finding the sponge cake, I could try looking in some of my mom’s old recipe books. Much of the baking in Israel in its early years was heavily influenced by european baking, and sponge cakes are really popular here (and there)!

Good luck!

Hi McBrownie,

Thank you! i appreciate your kind offer. You actually made me think of a lot of other resources I could commence my search.  I’ll look into some of the Israeli books in our library. I have Olive Trees And Honey. I would not have thought to look in that book if not for your suggestion.

Your mom’s books are a treasure. Have you baked from them? Do you make sponge cake?  If so, which is your favorite?

I’m not familiar with sponge cake at all but I do remember my uncle eating it.  It was a plain cake, in a loaf, with an amber-brown crust.  I don’t think it was flavored with add-on ingredients.

I know my uncle is going to be thrilled when he receives the honey cakes I’ve sent. You are right, he will gleam with delight.

Thank you so much!

 

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Posted: 23 January 2014 05:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Flour Girl - 23 January 2014 01:05 AM

Hi McBrownie,

Thank you! i appreciate your kind offer. You actually made me think of a lot of other resources I could commence my search.  I’ll look into some of the Israeli books in our library. I have Olive Trees And Honey. I would not have thought to look in that book if not for your suggestion.

Your mom’s books are a treasure. Have you baked from them? Do you make sponge cake?  If so, which is your favorite?

I’m not familiar with sponge cake at all but I do remember my uncle eating it.  It was a plain cake, in a loaf, with an amber-brown crust.  I don’t think it was flavored with add-on ingredients.

I know my uncle is going to be thrilled when he receives the honey cakes I’ve sent. You are right, he will gleam with delight.

Thank you so much!

 

Hey Flourgirl!
I don’t think Olive Trees and Honey is an Israeli cookbook- I think It’s an american cookbook by an american author. So maybe the recipes are adapted to the american market- though really I have no idea who Gil Marks is, and if it got a James Beard award [which it did!] then it’s probably an excellent book- just pointing my concern. I’m hoping you’ll find the recipe there!

I have baked from my mom’s books a few times, and the recipes are very clear. I love it that even then, there was a preface that explained how many ml a cup is and and in the end there was a chart stating how much do common ingredients weigh!
I specifically recall a chocolate chiffon cake which was baked very frequently and that is my favorite, though I haven’t baked it in a long time! Actually I haven’t baked sponge cakes in a long time as well. It’s normally baked for desserts in Israel because many keep kosher, and it’s normally dairy-free. Also, many just do it because their parents did it!
I don’t really remember a sponge cake in a loaf pan. BTW our standard loaf pans are longer than today’s 9x5 inch pans- do you remember it as well? Or was the 9x5 pan always common?

Also, most of the cakes back then were baked in a tube pan [or, as we call it “Wonder Pot”- because the cake was cooked on the stove! not sure how that went, that was before my time], but anyway one cake, which was hugely popular, was what we call a “juice cake”, because it was made with orange juice. It does have a dark crust [because of all the sugar I reckon] and a soft, yellow interior. It also didn’t have an orange flavor because the zest was out!

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Posted: 23 January 2014 12:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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McBrownie - 23 January 2014 05:07 AM
Flour Girl - 23 January 2014 01:05 AM

Hi McBrownie,

Thank you! i appreciate your kind offer. You actually made me think of a lot of other resources I could commence my search.  I’ll look into some of the Israeli books in our library. I have Olive Trees And Honey. I would not have thought to look in that book if not for your suggestion.

Your mom’s books are a treasure. Have you baked from them? Do you make sponge cake?  If so, which is your favorite?

I’m not familiar with sponge cake at all but I do remember my uncle eating it.  It was a plain cake, in a loaf, with an amber-brown crust.  I don’t think it was flavored with add-on ingredients.

I know my uncle is going to be thrilled when he receives the honey cakes I’ve sent. You are right, he will gleam with delight.

Thank you so much!

 

Hey Flourgirl!
I don’t think Olive Trees and Honey is an Israeli cookbook- I think It’s an american cookbook by an american author. So maybe the recipes are adapted to the american market- though really I have no idea who Gil Marks is, and if it got a James Beard award [which it did!] then it’s probably an excellent book- just pointing my concern. I’m hoping you’ll find the recipe there!

I have baked from my mom’s books a few times, and the recipes are very clear. I love it that even then, there was a preface that explained how many ml a cup is and and in the end there was a chart stating how much do common ingredients weigh!
I specifically recall a chocolate chiffon cake which was baked very frequently and that is my favorite, though I haven’t baked it in a long time! Actually I haven’t baked sponge cakes in a long time as well. It’s normally baked for desserts in Israel because many keep kosher, and it’s normally dairy-free. Also, many just do it because their parents did it!
I don’t really remember a sponge cake in a loaf pan. BTW our standard loaf pans are longer than today’s 9x5 inch pans- do you remember it as well? Or was the 9x5 pan always common?

Also, most of the cakes back then were baked in a tube pan [or, as we call it “Wonder Pot”- because the cake was cooked on the stove! not sure how that went, that was before my time], but anyway one cake, which was hugely popular, was what we call a “juice cake”, because it was made with orange juice. It does have a dark crust [because of all the sugar I reckon] and a soft, yellow interior. It also didn’t have an orange flavor because the zest was out!


Hi McBrownie,

You mom’s book sounds great! I really can’t ask you to go to the trouble of typing the recipe. My family doesn’t come from Israel. Having done some research, I learned they ate Ashkenazi cuisine. Searching for recipes inJEWISH HOME COOKINGI recognized many of the foods my grandmother made. I would definitely call them Yiddish.

I have found many orange sponge cake recipes. I don’t think the cake we grew up on had an orange flavor but it was a long time ago. I will ask my uncle about that though.

The sponge cake recipe in Inside The Jewish Bakery has a plain sponge cake recipe. I checked their errata sheet and learned 1TB of lemon zest was missing from the recipe in editions 1 and 2. This might account for the orange flavor in other author’s versions. The recipe makes three 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 loaves.


I checked and Olive Trees And Honey does not have a sponge cake recipe. The recipes are supposed to reflect Jewish cooking around the world. I have never used the book. I bought a lot of cookbooks when Borders closed. OT&H was one of them.

McBrownie, I am new to baking. My mom didn’t bake so I don’t know which pans were commonly used.  I have tube pans in every size. However, loaves would be easier to stick in a USPS priority box. I love baking pans. I am so so-well stocked I had to install 2 pot racks so that I can remove my pots from the cabinets and make room for my baking pans. Also, I had to take over a pantry closet that formerly held cleaning products and light bulbs.  I think I have everything a recipe might require.  As gratifying as that is, it is also disappointing because I love buying baking pans. LOL

Thank you very much for your kind offer.

I might bake the sponge cake this week. I will post pics when I do.

 

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Posted: 23 January 2014 02:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Flour Girl, first of all I would be more than happy to type it for you- are you referring to the “juice-cake”? I think after you’ll ask your uncle, or get more details for the cake itself, I can try searching the books [there are alot of sponge cake recipes..].

Actually Ashkenazi [=eastern-european generally, but not only] baking heavily influenced the israeli kitchens due to all the patisserie/vienoisserie knowledge that was brought into the country after the holocaust and WW2, so most of the cakes would be familiar to you. I’m guessing some of the other desserts in those “Diasporic” [is that term correct?] jewish cookbooks would be Moroccan and/or Spanish, like many semolina cakes.
Anyway, I’m glad you found a recipe designed for loaf pans! The only reason I mentioned it was because all of my baking pans are a bit more “modern”, and so smaller than most of the pans back then, so everytime I want to make a recipe it’s a math project. Even new cookbooks still use those long, old-fashioned pans because people are so used to them [what’s absurd is that it’s even HARDER to find those pans than the new-standard american pans!]

Hmm, it seemed I got carried away again. Oh, I’m not sure how you checked Olive Tree and Honey, but if you should know that maybe it wasn’t called a sponge cake then.
I am also a pan-o-holic! We should form a club. I, too restrict myself everytime I go to a mall [my Mom’s pans are way too big for me to use- over 10” round springforms, so I had to rebuild my stock as well!] because honestly I just have no room for them!
The more I think about it, the more I realize just how grateful we should be if those are our problems..

Looking forward to see your results- good luck!

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Posted: 23 January 2014 11:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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McBrownie - 23 January 2014 02:24 PM

Flour Girl, first of all I would be more than happy to type it for you- are you referring to the “juice-cake”? I think after you’ll ask your uncle, or get more details for the cake itself, I can try searching the books [there are alot of sponge cake recipes..].

Actually Ashkenazi [=eastern-european generally, but not only] baking heavily influenced the israeli kitchens due to all the patisserie/vienoisserie knowledge that was brought into the country after the holocaust and WW2, so most of the cakes would be familiar to you. I’m guessing some of the other desserts in those “Diasporic” [is that term correct?] jewish cookbooks would be Moroccan and/or Spanish, like many semolina cakes.
Anyway, I’m glad you found a recipe designed for loaf pans! The only reason I mentioned it was because all of my baking pans are a bit more “modern”, and so smaller than most of the pans back then, so everytime I want to make a recipe it’s a math project. Even new cookbooks still use those long, old-fashioned pans because people are so used to them [what’s absurd is that it’s even HARDER to find those pans than the new-standard american pans!]

Hmm, it seemed I got carried away again. Oh, I’m not sure how you checked Olive Tree and Honey, but if you should know that maybe it wasn’t called a sponge cake then.
I am also a pan-o-holic! We should form a club. I, too restrict myself everytime I go to a mall [my Mom’s pans are way too big for me to use- over 10” round springforms, so I had to rebuild my stock as well!] because honestly I just have no room for them!
The more I think about it, the more I realize just how grateful we should be if those are our problems..

Looking forward to see your results- good luck!

Hi McBrownie,

Thank you! You are very generous to offer to do that for me.  I am going to try the sponge cake in Inside The Jewish Bakery first. Hopefully, that will be a good one. I love the apple cake in that book. If I can’t make a good sponge cake I will send him the apple cake. I’m sure he would like it too.

I spoke to my uncle tonight and he said the sponge cake has carbonated water as opposed to plain water.  He said that is what makes the cake spongy. Have you ever heard of that?

Your post is very interesting.  I didn’t know any of what you said. This is actually my first experience with baking Jewish cakes.  Do you know the dimensions of the old fashioned loaf pan? I have seen a 12 x 4 pan. It has the same capacity as a 9 x 5 loaf pan.

How I searched Olive Tree & Honey is a very good point.  Their index doesn’t list cakes. I did see some baked fruit desserts but nothing else. 

Do you bake many traditionally Jewish cakes? Which are your favorites?

Thank you McBrownie.  I’ll post pics asap.

Have a good evening grin

 

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Posted: 24 January 2014 02:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Good Morning Flour Girl [well at least around here]
Have you made the apple cake already? Please post a picture of the cake, I’m curious to know how it looks like. Alot of the everyday apple cakes people make here are apple chunks or slivers folded into an egg-foam-and-oil cake batter, kind of like the cake Dorie Greenspan’s “French Apple Cake” from one of her books.

I have never made a sponge cake with carbonated water, but I think I’ve read a few recipes in one specific baking-book! To guess from my very limited cooking experience, I’m thinkingit replaces water and baking soda to give an extra lift [I’ve seen it being done in indian dishes].

I don’t remember the width of the pan, but the length is 30 cm- so a 12x4 pan might be just right.

I’m not so sure what a traditional jewish cake is. The thing about Israel is that there are alot of people from different background, so my traditional baking may not be traditional to your background! for instance, a bee-sting cake might be traditionally jewish to Ashkenazi jews, but not to Sephardi jews! We all have the same traditions- like baking flourless cakes for Passover, which is traditionally jewish- but every one is influenced by his or her own’s heritage. I think in America it’s called “Jewish” because the jews in america are generally Ashkenazi!
BTW, even the same baked good can be completely different in America/Canada and Israel. For instance, Rugelach in America/Canada is a small, simple, nut-and-jam-filled cream cheese cookie. In Israel, a Rugelach is almost like a chocolatey croissant- big, yeasty, loaded with butter [and folded in it as well] and filled with chocolate!
It’s all relativism, really. But that doesn’t matter- the important thing is that it tastes good!

Edit: BTW #2- if there are liquids in the cake [carbonated water] then just as I suspected- it’s not really a sponge cake! At least not what we now call a sponge cake. In Israel it’s generally thought of a plain cake [pound cake], so here’s another option for you to look!
Also, I just asked my mom if she ever read a recipe for a sponge cake with carbonated water and she said YES! Now it’s just a question of figuring out where she had seen it smile

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Posted: 24 January 2014 11:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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McBrownie - 24 January 2014 02:42 AM

Good Morning Flour Girl [well at least around here]
Have you made the apple cake already? Please post a picture of the cake, I’m curious to know how it looks like. Alot of the everyday apple cakes people make here are apple chunks or slivers folded into an egg-foam-and-oil cake batter, kind of like the cake Dorie Greenspan’s “French Apple Cake” from one of her books.

I have never made a sponge cake with carbonated water, but I think I’ve read a few recipes in one specific baking-book! To guess from my very limited cooking experience, I’m thinkingit replaces water and baking soda to give an extra lift [I’ve seen it being done in indian dishes].

I don’t remember the width of the pan, but the length is 30 cm- so a 12x4 pan might be just right.

I’m not so sure what a traditional jewish cake is. The thing about Israel is that there are alot of people from different background, so my traditional baking may not be traditional to your background! for instance, a bee-sting cake might be traditionally jewish to Ashkenazi jews, but not to Sephardi jews! We all have the same traditions- like baking flourless cakes for Passover, which is traditionally jewish- but every one is influenced by his or her own’s heritage. I think in America it’s called “Jewish” because the jews in america are generally Ashkenazi!
BTW, even the same baked good can be completely different in America/Canada and Israel. For instance, Rugelach in America/Canada is a small, simple, nut-and-jam-filled cream cheese cookie. In Israel, a Rugelach is almost like a chocolatey croissant- big, yeasty, loaded with butter [and folded in it as well] and filled with chocolate!
It’s all relativism, really. But that doesn’t matter- the important thing is that it tastes good!

Edit: BTW #2- if there are liquids in the cake [carbonated water] then just as I suspected- it’s not really a sponge cake! At least not what we now call a sponge cake. In Israel it’s generally thought of a plain cake [pound cake], so here’s another option for you to look!
Also, I just asked my mom if she ever read a recipe for a sponge cake with carbonated water and she said YES! Now it’s just a question of figuring out where she had seen it smile

Good morning/afternoon McBrownie,

First let me thank you for all the time you are giving to my search. I sincerely appreciate your help.

I have made the apple cake many times. My husband loves it. Below is a pic of my version of Aunt Lillian’s Apple Cake from Inside The Jewish Bakery. I drizzled a glaze over the cake made from confectioner’s sugar, boiled cider and vanilla. The cake was baked in a 10” tube. It is unlike Dorie’s. I made Dorie’s from a recipe posted on a blog. I only have one of her books, Baking With Julia. I’ve tried her other books from the library but didn’t add them to my collection.

This cake is different because it is very tender and moist. Dorie’s cake was more apple than cake, if I remember correctly. The cake I made calls for 510g of apple. I cut the apples into smaller pieces than the apples were supposed to be. The result is the apples were fully cooked and blended into the cake.  I always do that with apple recipes because I don’t like to bite into hard chunks.

I have never heard of carbonated water in sponge cake either. Every recipe I have read does not use it in it’s batter.

You are right about traditional cakes. I mean to say common cakes found in a Jewish bakery in the U.S. Baked goods my uncle would be familiar with as he grew up pre-WWII.

Thank you for your excellent points. Again, I would not have realized cakes are so different yet share the same name.

The recipe I am going to try has 2 versions. One is with baking soda and the author says it is for those who want “insurance” that the cake rises.  Do you think the one with baking soda is acceptable to use?  Both call for a bain marie. It also uses 2TB hot water and light corn syrup. Can I sub with Lyle’s Golden Syrup?

Thank you McBrownie!

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Posted: 25 January 2014 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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[quote author=“Flour Girl” date=“1390580450
Good morning/afternoon McBrownie,

First let me thank you for all the time you are giving to my search. I sincerely appreciate your help.

I have made the apple cake many times. My husband loves it. Below is a pic of my version of Aunt Lillian’s Apple Cake from Inside The Jewish Bakery. I drizzled a glaze over the cake made from confectioner’s sugar, boiled cider and vanilla. The cake was baked in a 10” tube. It is unlike Dorie’s. I made Dorie’s from a recipe posted on a blog. I only have one of her books, Baking With Julia. I’ve tried her other books from the library but didn’t add them to my collection.

This cake is different because it is very tender and moist. Dorie’s cake was more apple than cake, if I remember correctly. The cake I made calls for 510g of apple. I cut the apples into smaller pieces than the apples were supposed to be. The result is the apples were fully cooked and blended into the cake.  I always do that with apple recipes because I don’t like to bite into hard chunks.

I have never heard of carbonated water in sponge cake either. Every recipe I have read does not use it in it’s batter.

You are right about traditional cakes. I mean to say common cakes found in a Jewish bakery in the U.S. Baked goods my uncle would be familiar with as he grew up pre-WWII.

Thank you for your excellent points. Again, I would not have realized cakes are so different yet share the same name.

The recipe I am going to try has 2 versions. One is with baking soda and the author says it is for those who want “insurance” that the cake rises.  Do you think the one with baking soda is acceptable to use?  Both call for a bain marie. It also uses 2TB hot water and light corn syrup. Can I sub with Lyle’s Golden Syrup?

Thank you McBrownie!

Hey Flour Girl!

Yes, I agree- Dorie’s cake is def more apple then cake, and the apple are chunkier!
I have a friend that recommended me once to cut my apple into smaller bits so that they will “melt” into appley, puddingy, delicious puddles whenever I make apple muffins and I am so grateful for her tip!
Israeli cakes aren’t as low in flour, but egg-whisking/whipping method is still common [I think the Dorie’s cake used that technique]. Anyway I tried looking in one of the books I thought it would be but I haven’t had any luck. I did find some pastries [pie crusts] that use it, though! I’ll try and look in the other books. I’m sure I’ve seen it somewhere!
The reason I thought I would be helpful for you is because some of the old books’ recipes may be more similar to the recipes your uncle loved, than the new, modern, cookbooks that adapt themselves into its market [say- the American market].

Hmm, that is so weird. I have never heard of baking a normal. butter/sponge cake in a bain marie.
I think baking soda is acceptable because I know my grandmothers used it when they baked sometimes, and although not from europe, I think it says something about the availability of ingredients. Is the baking soda mixed with the hot water? If so, it probably mirrors carbonated water, doesn’t it?
Whenever I see a recipe for light corn syrup I almost always, unless the author specifically forbids it, replace it with golden syrup, so I think you can. It’s probably there just for texture [though I have not seen the recipes].

Actually, you know who would probably know about old fashioned “jewish” recipes? Rose! I bet if you could ask her, she would at least point us in the right direction!
I’ll try looking for the recipe in some of the other books when I can.
Good luck, in the meantime!

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Posted: 26 January 2014 04:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Hey Flour Girl!

Yes, I agree- Dorie’s cake is def more apple then cake, and the apple are chunkier!
I have a friend that recommended me once to cut my apple into smaller bits so that they will “melt” into appley, puddingy, delicious puddles whenever I make apple muffins and I am so grateful for her tip!
Israeli cakes aren’t as low in flour, but egg-whisking/whipping method is still common [I think the Dorie’s cake used that technique]. Anyway I tried looking in one of the books I thought it would be but I haven’t had any luck. I did find some pastries [pie crusts] that use it, though! I’ll try and look in the other books. I’m sure I’ve seen it somewhere!
The reason I thought I would be helpful for you is because some of the old books’ recipes may be more similar to the recipes your uncle loved, than the new, modern, cookbooks that adapt themselves into its market [say- the American market].

Hmm, that is so weird. I have never heard of baking a normal. butter/sponge cake in a bain marie.
I think baking soda is acceptable because I know my grandmothers used it when they baked sometimes, and although not from europe, I think it says something about the availability of ingredients. Is the baking soda mixed with the hot water? If so, it probably mirrors carbonated water, doesn’t it?
Whenever I see a recipe for light corn syrup I almost always, unless the author specifically forbids it, replace it with golden syrup, so I think you can. It’s probably there just for texture [though I have not seen the recipes].

Actually, you know who would probably know about old fashioned “jewish” recipes? Rose! I bet if you could ask her, she would at least point us in the right direction!
I’ll try looking for the recipe in some of the other books when I can.
Good luck, in the meantime!

Hi McBrownie,

That information is very helpful! Thank you so much! I have to ask him more questions. I was trying to keep my sponge cake a secret from him until his birthday. I’m thinking to make the apple cake. I’m sure he will love it. i think it is perfect for a birthday. Perhaps after his birthday I can work on a sponge cake for him with his assistance.

The cake is not baked in a bain marie. The ingredients are placed in a metal mixing bowl above hot water and whisked until they reach 130 degrees. At that time they are removed from the bain marie and whisked some more.

I would bet Rose would know about the traditional sponge cake. She recommended Marcy Goldman’s book A Treasury Of Jewish Holiday Baking on her blog. I have that book but have not looked for a sponge cake recipe in it yet. I was going with the book Inside The Jewish Bakery first because it sounds closer to my uncle’s experiences.

Have you been baking a lot recently?

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