Slow Rinse and Shine Article in Washington post (Nov 28)
Posted: 03 December 2007 12:34 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Last week there was an article published in Washington Post about slow rinse and shine baking.  (You may have to register with WP in order to view the article)

Has anyone tried out the recipes?  I’m planning to try out the cinnamon raisin recipe since I need to use up what I have before buying fresh boxes for the upcoming baking.

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Posted: 03 December 2007 04:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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just want to mention to be sure to use UNbleached flour for these breads such as my fav. harvest king. very interesting piece but they forgot to mention the type of flour and that is critical for all breads.i look forward to reports from those of you who will try these recipes!

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Posted: 03 December 2007 07:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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??RINSE??  or is it rise and shine, like in an overnight proof?? I ‘ve not looked at the article…maybe I should go do that first…

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Posted: 03 December 2007 07:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Just a typo ... .


Slow Rise. smile

Thanks for sharing the link, I’m giving the rolls a try. Cook’s Country Magazine had a similar muffin cup type recipe not long ago, but they went for speed, not flavor development.

(Thanks for the flour advice, Rose! I just stocked up on flour today at the store, which was actually on sale price. How’s that for timing?)

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Posted: 04 December 2007 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I made the cinnamon raisin bread. The result: sweet and kinda wet. We never finished it. I let it rise about 13 hours for the first rise. The second rise was taking so long that after 3 hours I put a pan of hot water and the bread in the stove (not on). That helped nudge it on. The instructions said to let it rise till it reached the top of the pan, but it seemed fully proofed before it reached the top. I’m glad I did - it did get some oven spring.

The layers of cinnamon mix ended up being slight swirls, not at all gooey, which to me isn’t a plus. I liked the sugar/cinnamon mix on top.

All in all, ok but a disappointment.

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Posted: 04 December 2007 02:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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BTW, I did use the Harvest King flour.

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Posted: 04 December 2007 08:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Well, my rolls are still rising, sigh.

I did forget the egg until just before I mixed the dough, so I can’t help thinking the cold egg slowed the rise of mine.


Editing a few hours later to add: They turned out fine!

The rise was a good bit slower than I’d been anticipating, so I kind of got sick of waiting for them to rise.

I made mine in my Texas sized muffin tins, and by the time the dough had risen a little more than halfway up the pan sides, I’d decided to just go ahead and bake them.

I baked the two pans separately, for about 15 minutes each at 400F in my convection oven.

They rose above the tops of the muffin tins, lots of oven spring, and turned out nicely darkly golden brown and crisp on the outside, and nicely soft and moist on the inside.

I think maybe a few more minutes baking might have made them a touch less moist, but since I knew going in that I’d be reheating the majority of these for later service, I didn’t want to over them.

As it was, dad and I between us ate four of them in just a few minutes. smile

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Posted: 05 December 2007 09:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I started the cinnamon recipe.  It’s still rising and taking a while to do so.  Also rather wet - I ended up using all bout 1/4 cup of water.  I think I also put a little too much oil on top.  Next time I’ll leave the oil out.  I don’t have high hopes for this first batch due to the extreme wetness.  I think for the 2nd batch I’m going to cut down on the amount of water - 1 3/4 cups just sounds too much to me.

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Posted: 05 December 2007 05:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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How did yours turn out? I thought the same about the oil, but in the end it seemed ok. If I were to try it again, like you, I would use less water and also would reserve some of the butter from the dough and brush some on the dough layer before sprinkling the cinnamon sugar on, and the replacing some of the white sugar in the layer with dark brown hoping to get some gooeyness into it.  Did you find it worth tweaking?

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Posted: 07 December 2007 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Despite the fact that I accidently put in all 4 1/2 tbl of butter rather than reserving a little bit for drizzling on the top, and sprinkling the last of the sugar/cinnamon mixture on the top before realizing that I was supposed to brush the butter on and then sprinkling the sugar on, it seemed to have turned out well. 

here’s how it turned out:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2177/2090797401_a09cccccc4_m.jpg

The top is a little too brown for my taste, but it’s not hard. Also, I think the yeast had subsided a bit by the time I got to bake it, so that’s why it looks more like a quick bread than a real bread with that round top.  It does taste good, though.

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Posted: 07 December 2007 09:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Cook’s Illustrated has included a re-do of this recipe in their January/February issue.  Their modifications include the following:

- although the bread is technically a “no-knead”, they incorporated a brief, 15-second knead into the process to improve the crumb structure with less liquid for a less squat loaf.  A side benefit was the rising time could be reduced to as little as eight hours.
- they incorporated a mixture of vinegar and beer to replicate a bakery fermented starter to improve the taste of the original recipe, which they felt was “lackluster.”
- their variations on the plain white loaf include White with Olives, Rosemary and Parmesan; Seeded Rye; Whole Wheat; and Cranberry-Pecan.

I have a bunch of stuff to do today and I have to work tomorrow, but I’m thinking I’m going to try the white loaf on Sunday - I’ll start it Saturday night, then finish it when I get home from church.  I’ll let you know how it goes.

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Posted: 07 December 2007 10:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Hmm . . . now I’m going to have to go over to the bookstore to see if this issue is in yet.

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Posted: 07 December 2007 06:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Thanks for sharing a photo, I’m impressed with your bread.

I don’t have a camera, but it’s kind of irrelevant, since the rolls I baked are already gone. smile (Dad nibbled on them for snacks whenever I wasn’t looking, LOL!!)

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Posted: 09 December 2007 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I’m doing the bread for supper tomorrow instead ... today is my daughter’s birthday (she turned three) and she has requested “Mommy’s pizza” for supper.  Not a good match with artisan-style bread wink Tomorrow, I’m trying CI’s new “poulet en cocotte” recipe as well, which will be a much better match.

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Posted: 10 December 2007 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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The dough is finishing up its overnight rest.  I started it at 9:00 p.m. last night and the revised CI recipe calls for a 8-18 hour rest.  I’ll probably continue on with the rest of the recipe between noon and 1 today.

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Posted: 11 December 2007 09:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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The experiment was not a success:

CI’s No Knead Bread 2.0

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