Can Honey Buttercream be piped?
Posted: 09 April 2014 12:15 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Making a birthday cake next week for my girls and they want ruffles piped around the sides of the bottom layer, but they also have a sugar restriction so I can only use honey or maple syrup to sweeten. Before I waste any more ingredients on testing, does anyone know if Rose’s Honey Buttercream is stable enough for piping? Seems like the only buttercream recipes I see piped are made pretty stiff with powdered sugar (American buttercream and way too overly sweet) any other buttercream seems to just be spread on. Am I out of luck needing a honey-sweetened, pipe-able buttercream?

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Posted: 09 April 2014 05:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, enorems0!

Welcome!

First, I haven’t made Rose’s honey buttercream, so I can’t help you there.

You could try using a solid honey like YS’s raw honey.  It’s a completely opaque yellow, and it’s solid at room temp.  Melt the honey gently—it doesn’t take much heat at all—you can put the container of honey into a pan of warm water (and you don’t want to cook it or get it at all hot).  Then let it cool—before it gets to room temp (when it will solidify again), beat it with the butter and any other flavors you want to use (unsweetened chocolate, cocoa powder, lemon zest, vanilla, whatever).  It will be soft, but it will firm up with time, because as the honey completey cools, it will become solid.  You can refrigerate it to help it along, but be sure to pipe it at the right firmness.  As long as you’re in a normally cool place, it will stay as firm as any frosting.  If it’s warm, though, it could soften because the honey will liquify—it’s solid at room temp, but not at warm temps.

Although I think this should be firm enough, if you need to firm it further, you can add cocoa butter to the frosting—again, melted, cooled and beaten in.  It’s solid at room temp—super solid, like chocolate—so it will firm up anything it’s added to (after it has time to set and return it it’s super solid state).  It will add richness, but not much flavor and no sweetness.

Too bad they want ruffles. It seems to me that ruffles would be particularly fussy about remaining stable, as compared to, say, flowers.

Good luck, whichever route you go!

—ak

Here’s a link to the honey—you can use organic or not organic:

Organic:  http://www.amazon.com/YS-Organic-CERTIFIED-Unprocessed-Unpasteurized/dp/B00014JNI0/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1397077174&sr=8-3&keywords=ys+honey

Not organic:  http://www.amazon.com/Y-S-Eco-Bee-Farms-Honey/dp/B000Z93FQC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397077174&sr=8-1&keywords=ys+honey

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Posted: 10 April 2014 08:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi,
I have never make the Honey Butter cream, so I don’t know about your problem.
I can’t help you.

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Posted: 10 April 2014 10:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Did a little research on thickening frosting, and I’m wondering if adding a little arrowroot starch would be workable in Rose’s honey buttercream recipe. I know arrowroot is a ‘no no’ with dairy in general, but the honey is fairly acidic and I’ll be adding a strawberry/honey syrup for flavoring as well which will help bring the pH down *I’ll also be using farm-fresh eggs which aren’t as basic as old grocery store eggs. Is this a bad idea? When would I add the arrowroot, with the strawberry/honey syrup at the end? Any guesses on how much to add?

I only have a week left to figure this out before the party so unfortunately I don’t have time to buy a specialty honey - I say specialty, but I do actually have a jar of it in my cabinet… it’s just empty and I won’t be able to get to the special store where I buy it until the day before the party! I didn’t realize it would return to solid after warming though, guess I never let it sit around after warming it. Considering the amount of honey I need for the cake and frosting, I just bought a big jar of local (pasteurized) honey at the grocery store.

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Posted: 10 April 2014 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hi, emorems0!

I don’t know about arrowroot, so I can’t help you there…

However, one other option is this:  I don’t know what flavor the frosting is to be, but if you can get your hands on some freeze dried fruit (not regular chewy dried, but the crispy freeze dried)— Crispy Green is the brand at my groc—you can powder it in your coffee grinder.  It’s super-absorbent, so it will help to thicken a thin frosting.  Count on using at least 6 little bags (I think 1 big bag has 6 little ones in it).  Powder it (totally powder it), add it to a very small quantity of frosting, stir until it’s evenly distributed and no clumpy areas are left (i.e., it gets clumpy like cocoa powder in water, and you have to sort of work to get it all distributed so there’s no identifiable, unblended dry powder left), then add that frosting to the whole batch.  The dried fruit “dissolved” in frosting will distribute better throughout the big batch then adding it directly. It makes a very yummy frosting, too!  I’ve done it with both strawberry and banana.  I’ve always wanted to do pear.

Hope that’s helpful!  And good luck!

—ak

p.s.  As an FYI, the honey will re-solidify as long as you don’t melt it with anything but very gentle heat.

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Posted: 16 April 2014 05:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I haven’t made Rose’s honey buttercream but I have made the classic, which the honey is a variation of.  It is a soft buttercream and you will need to use temperature to get the right consistency for piping.  The cake should be chilled, and the buttercream should be not too warm and not too cool.  If it softens too much at any point, pop it in the fridge for a few minutes and then resume. 

Rose’s classic buttercream also has a Lyle’s golden syrup version in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes, it is wonderful stuff.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I made the Royal Honey buttercream before and it tends to be on the soft side. So it is either I pipe it quick in cooler kitchen ambient temperature (i.e early in the morning) or keep cooling it in the refrigerator till it slightly firms up. It is quite a pain to work with for decorating cakes and cupcakes. My question is: Can I use powdered honey? I saw it in a grocery store once and a bulb lit. If I can use it, does anyone know how much to use it? I would assume to add it according to taste; but if I am making a big batch of frosting for a cake, it will be good to have a starting point. This will also help me figure out how much of the honey powder to buy instead of running to the store each time I run out. Besides, the store is quite a distance from my home and it is not cost effective for me to go to the store multiple times if I can buy it in bulk. Similarly, I don’t want to buy too much of it because I don’t get a request for it often.

Thank you.

Jack

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