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Major Problem: sugar syrup crystalizes b4 i can mix it into egg whites
Posted: 08 December 2008 05:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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lemon neoclassic buttercream or lemon mousseline with the white choc whisper cake?

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Posted: 08 December 2008 05:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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i may very well make the blueberry pool. i’m also bringing some mini open face pies. regular size pies is just too much. the ones i’m brining are about 2.5 inches in diameter so they are the perfect finger dessert. mixed berry, peach, pear, and apple are the fillings. i make pies, but wanted to add a cake for those who usually don’t like pie.

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Posted: 09 December 2008 09:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Thanks for all your responses. I am moving right along. A few more small questions:

1. the egg yolks shd be beaten til they are light in color. how long shd they be beaten? i have a kitchen aid stand mixer and the speed levels go up to 12 or 14 (i think). i don’t want to over beat the yolks b4 beating in the syrup.

2. i’ve been using a whisk attachment to make the buttercream. just want to make sure that is the preferred attachment as opposed to the flat beater attachment.

3. i made a layer of the white chocolate whisper cake on sunday. i took it ouf of the pan after 10mins and then put it on a glass serving plate to cool. when i came back an hour later and cut it, there was some problems w/ the cake sticking to the serviing plate when i tried to cut a piece of cake to try it. how can i avoid the sticking from happening when i make the cake for work tomorrow?

4. when assembling the cake, shd i stack them right side up? and also does anyone suggest i shave off the bottom crust?

5. i made the cake w/o using magi strips and it came out pretty level. shd i worry with wrappinng the pans with magi strips? is the results significantly improved?

also, i tasted the buttercream again this morning. the buttery taste is gone. after a few days refrigerated, the lemon flavor is stronger than it was the first day. tahnks everyone.

I know i have a lot of questions. I really appreciate all your input. Very helpful. Thanks again!

Steve the Newbie
new york, new york

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Posted: 09 December 2008 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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1. when i beat the yolks for classic BC i let them go until they are thickened and creamy. usually several minutes. it will begin to look a bit like very smooth cake batter. i find this gives the most volume.

2. i use the whisk for MBC and the paddle for CBC.

3. you must cool your cake on a rack with air circulating all around. the cake stuck to the plate because the escaping heat condensed into steam and made your cake soggy on the bottom.

4. stacking: everyone does it differently. here’s how i do it: i bake 1 thick layer and 1 thin layer. the thick layer is torted (split) and the bottom is placed first, cut side up, then the top, also cut side up, then the thin layer with the bottom up so that the top has a nice ,crisp edge.  i never shave off the bottom crust. it is usually softer than the top if you use parchment or waxed paper on the bottom of your pan.

5. If your cakes are coming out level then don’t worry about the strips.

6. just like savory foods the flavors will intensify as they homogenize thru the buttercream.

good luck, jen

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Posted: 09 December 2008 02:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Thanks Jen! That was a great response.

Steven

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Posted: 09 December 2008 09:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I use the whisk for all the meringue type buttercreams I make - yolks, whole egg, Swiss and Italian.  When I make the neoclassic, I start the whisk when I put the corn syrup on the heat.  You will get the most volume and most creamy texture if you beat the yolks until they are very very thick.  You also want the butter to be on the cool side (not cold, but not squishy in any way) for the best results.  The only caveat I can add is that I use pasteurized yolks (no added sugar, and I think this product might be limited to the trade as I’ve not seen it in grocery stores) and these behave differently than shelled eggs.  To me, they seem a little more denatured than shelled eggs - curds are not as thick when made with them compared to shelled eggs so you might not have to start quite as early as I do, but do start early to get the best volume for your buttercream.  There’s no danger in overbeating yolks as there is with whites.

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Posted: 10 December 2008 10:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Wow, Steve, sounds like you are getting a lot of great answers.

To choose between lemon neoclassic and lemon mousseline:
-NCBC is richer, denser, more deeply yellow (which is nice against a white cake) and less work/easier.
-MBC is lighter/more airy, harder to make, more time consuming (because of making the curd first) and requires fortitude to see it through any curdling.  If you love lemon curd, though, you will swoon over this.

For cooling whipped eggs/whites:
I know of two tricks here, first, keep a a couple of tablespoons of butter at 40F and add it one at a time to the somewhat cooled eggs (maybe 80-85 F) to cool them down the rest of the way.

Or, after several minutes in the mixer, cool with water bath.  Either get a water bath attachment for your mixer or use a wet towel around the outside or place the bowl over another bowl of cool water and whisk.  In an ideal world the eggs and butter should be close to the same temp and not too hot or cold, say between 65-70. 

For Mousseline, butter at 65 F is best.  If (or maybe I should say when) it curdles, check the temp to make sure it is around 65-67.  Use water bath if necessary, and beat until it comes together.  Continue to add the rest of the butter by the tablespoonful.

If your buttercream tastes too buttery and you’re using unsalted, add more flavoring.  Most of Rose’s buttercreams will hold a little more flavoring (puree, liqueur, etc) than called for, but then you have to be careful about stability, ie, don’t leave the cake out for a half day.

Good luck, and we’d all love to see pics!

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