Ankarsrum
Posted: 08 June 2014 03:16 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I finally pulled the trigger on buying one of these things, and it was probably Rose that affected my timing. I had actually ordered one a year or so ago, but everyone was out of stock, so I bought the Bosch Universal instead.

I’d been unhappy with the Bosch because it didn’t handle small batches well, nor very wet dough. There was a smaller bowl insert that could be ordered to do small batches, but I couldn’t find any reviews on how well it worked, and I had already spent a lot of money on Bosch attachments to compensate for its shortcomings.

Neither my old KA nor my newer Cuisinart mixer did any better on small batches or wet dough, so I typically had to use my food processor.

I first tried my cracked wheat bread in the unit. I had read a lot on how to use this machine and everyone said that you needed to add the liquid first. However, my cracked wheat loaf doesn’t really have any liquid….it’s bound up in the soaker and the poolish. So I just dumped everything in at once and turned the machine on, using the roller. I’m happy to say that it mixed the ingredients together in just a few rotations and proceeded to work the dough without problem until it was done. Then I noticed my small cup of salt that I had forgotten to add, so I dumped it in with a few tablespoons of water. The extra water made the dough fall apart, but I ran the mixer for another 7 minutes or so and it came together again. I was using a pretty slow speed, so this all could have happened much faster.

I wondered how small a batch it could make and how wet? For an experiment, I dumped 100 g of flour and 100 g of water in the bowl and turned it on high speed. Eight minutes later, I had a shiny, very bubble gummy mass of dough that produced a nice window pane. My only interference with the mixing was to pull the arm to the center a couple of times to pick up the dough that had accumulated there, but I’m not sure this was even necessary.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

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Posted: 14 June 2014 04:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Charles, so glad to hear of your first experiences with the Ankarsrum.  I’ve heard it doesn’t oxygenate the dough as much as other mixers, so it’s perfect for high hydration breads.  I’ve been wanting one ever since I saw it at a trade show, you and Rose are going to wear me down. smile

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Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

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Posted: 14 June 2014 06:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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“’ve heard it doesn’t oxygenate the dough as much as other mixers”

That would be my guess, based on the fact it doesn’t fold the dough over on itself, but just compresses it over and over again under the roller. On the flip side, I wonder how well it incorporates ingredients added late in the process. A brioche, for instance.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

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Posted: 28 June 2014 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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You’ll have to make some brioche and report back smile  Let me know if you need any help with leftovers.

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Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

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