Sturdy(ish) yellow cake?
Posted: 03 July 2014 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello everyone, I’m brand new here and I’ll try not to be too obnoxious!  I’ve been trying to find a recipe for a yellow cake which comes out not too moist and fluffy, but not as dense and heavy as a pound cake.  I’m using it in a trifle which gets juicy sliced strawberries (lots of juice!) poured over it before the other elements are layered on.  I want the cake to soak up some (or most) of the juice so if the cake starts out very moist, it might not have much room for juice, right?  I’d even like the cake to not be terribly sweet if possible.  Thanks in advance!

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Posted: 03 July 2014 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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kittenfix - 03 July 2014 04:22 PM

Hello everyone, I’m brand new here and I’ll try not to be too obnoxious!  I’ve been trying to find a recipe for a yellow cake which comes out not too moist and fluffy, but not as dense and heavy as a pound cake.  I’m using it in a trifle which gets juicy sliced strawberries (lots of juice!) poured over it before the other elements are layered on.  I want the cake to soak up some (or most) of the juice so if the cake starts out very moist, it might not have much room for juice, right?  I’d even like the cake to not be terribly sweet if possible.  Thanks in advance!


KITTENFIX:
  Good afternoon. Welcome to our baking forum. Kittenfix, a yellow cake is also known as 1-2-3-4 cake.

I mention this to you just in case you are left to find your own recipe.
I can eventually help you with this recipe.

This information I just mentioned to you comes in two varieties, ie, separating the eggs & whipping up the whites or employing the eggs whole. If you wish a strurdy baked product I would not separate the eggs.

Good luck in your quest & keep us posted.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 20 July 2014 11:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I love a sponge cake in a trifle, ie, a cake that is leavened by whipped eggs and has more eggs than flour in it.  I would probably choose genoise if it were me, but make sure there is enough syrup for it (such as the amount Rose puts in her genoise) or the cake will be dry.

If you don’t want to go down that road and want a butter cake instead, you can’t go wrong with the sour cream butter cake over on the blog section of this site (Rose’s favorite cake).  It is more dense and velvety than the fluffiest layer cakes but has less butter and is lighter than a pound cake.  Another excellent cake with strawberries/syrup is the golden butter cream cake from the Cake Bible.

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Posted: 20 July 2014 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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~FRESHKID - 03 July 2014 06:40 PM
kittenfix - 03 July 2014 04:22 PM

Hello everyone, I’m brand new here and I’ll try not to be too obnoxious!  I’ve been trying to find a recipe for a yellow cake which comes out not too moist and fluffy, but not as dense and heavy as a pound cake.  I’m using it in a trifle which gets juicy sliced strawberries (lots of juice!) poured over it before the other elements are layered on.  I want the cake to soak up some (or most) of the juice so if the cake starts out very moist, it might not have much room for juice, right?  I’d even like the cake to not be terribly sweet if possible.  Thanks in advance!


KITTENFIX:
  Good afternoon. Welcome to our baking forum. Kittenfix, a yellow cake is also known as 1-2-3-4 cake.

I mention this to you just in case you are left to find your own recipe.
I can eventually help you with this recipe.

This information I just mentioned to you comes in two varieties, ie, separating the eggs & whipping up the whites or employing the eggs whole. If you wish a strurdy baked product I would not separate the eggs.

Good luck in your quest & keep us posted.

  ~FRESHKID.

Thank you for your reply, FRESHKID, I never would have thought to look for a recipe where I didn’t separate the eggs. I should have checked back here before baking!  I ended up finding a recipe called a combination of a yellow cake and a chiffon cake.  It was good, not too “cottony” not too dense.  I wish I would have made one to frost so I could have been able to really judge the cake, because once I poured sliced strawberries all over it, and the other gloop, it’s all delicious but it’s not about the cake itself at that point!  But I saved the recipe, and next time I just HAVE to have cake, I’ll make that one again so I can figure out if I love it.

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Posted: 20 July 2014 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Julie - 20 July 2014 11:22 AM

I love a sponge cake in a trifle, ie, a cake that is leavened by whipped eggs and have more eggs than flour in it.  I would probably choose genoise if it were me, but make sure there is enough syrup for it (such as the amount Rose puts in her genoise) or the cake will be dry.

If you don’t want to go down that road and want a butter cake instead, you can’t go wrong with the sour cream butter cake over on the blog section of this site (Rose’s favorite cake).  It is more dense and velvety than the fluffiest layer cakes but has less butter and is lighter than a pound cake.  Another excellent cake with strawberries/syrup is the golden butter cream cake from the Cake Bible.

Thank you!  I never tried a sour cream butter cake and the texture you’re describing sounds like exactly what I wanted.  The cake I ended up making was good, but it rose much higher than I expected and for the first time in years I couldn’t fit both whole layers in my trifle bowl—I had to split them or I couldn’t fit all the gooey innards into the trifle!  Do you know if the sour cream butter cake is especially high-rising?  Thank you again!

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Posted: 25 July 2014 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Here’s the recipe:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/10/roses_favorite_yellow_layer_ca.html#.U9JC1fldV8E

Rose is very meticulous, she often states how high a layer will be.  In general, she prefers not to have a super-deep cake (especially where butter cakes are concerned), because giving a butter cake enough structure to support itself in a deeper layer sacrifices the tender texture that she likes.  The cake above bakes up to about 1.75” tall.

Sponge-type cakes are a different story, they are more frequently baked in a deeper layer (chiffons and angels) such as a tube pan.

Your trifle looks great!

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