How do you get fresh bread first thing in the morning?
Posted: 07 July 2014 03:53 PM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  108
Joined  2009-09-09

Hi!!!

So I just got the bread bible and I’m totally excited to start baking with it.
I just tried the cheddar loaf recipe and I’m so happy with the results.
But I’ve tried to go through the book to look for a recipe that I can shape, refrigerate it overnight and bake right away but there doesn’t seem to be any.
I noticed the couple of recipes I did find, they say to take out the bread 1-1.5 hours ahead of baking time and then bake.

What are your tips & tricks to get fresh bread in the morning?

Thanks
Aggie

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 July 2014 10:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27

I’ve tried to go through the book to look for a recipe that I can shape, refrigerate it overnight and bake right away but there doesn’t seem to be any.

You can do that for pretty any recipe in the book. You may have to experiment to see how long to let the dough proof before putting it in the refrigerator, but you can put it directly in the oven when the dough is cold.

 

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 08:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  108
Joined  2009-09-09

I thought I had to bring it out so the yeast reactivates before I start baking. Should I put it into the oven as it’s preheating? Or wait until it’s heated.
Is there a reason why her baguette direction requires 1.5 hours rest outside of the fridge before baking?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 11:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Aggie - 10 July 2014 08:38 AM

Is there a reason why her baguette direction requires 1.5 hours rest outside of the fridge before baking?

It’s probably an assumption, more than an empirically established fact. Pretty much all baking books that recommend a stint in the refrigerator also recommend allowing the bread to come up to room temperature before baking, but one author discovered to his surprise that straight to the oven works fine, or better. I can’t remember whether it was Hammelman or Reinhart. It’s just something that most of them have never tried.

When you think about it, the refrigerator is only about 30 degrees colder than room temperature, but your oven will be over 300 degrees hotter, so having to raise the bread temperature an extra 30 degrees just isn’t a big deal.

Many people over on TheFreshLoaf (a bread baking site) report great success moving directly from the refrigerator to a preheated oven.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/35298/final-rise-straight-fridge-or-not

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 01:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  108
Joined  2009-09-09

Thanks! I’ll start doing experiments then. It’ll take some time
I’ll do it by the book first and then try straight from fridge.

One thing I did noticed about my fridge is that it’s too cold…I have things that freeze over >_< So that might be a problem.
When I put the sponge in the fridge, it was below the temperature that was noted for a sponge in fridge. It didn’t rise at all….
Maybe I put it in too early so the yeast activity didn’t start yet….not sure…
I’ll keep on trying

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Aggie - 10 July 2014 01:10 PM

One thing I did noticed about my fridge is that it’s too cold…I have things that freeze over

Same here. You might let the stuff proof at room temperature for a while, then put it in the fridge. Small items will probably cool down very fast.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 07:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3171
Joined  2010-04-25

You might be able to even set a timer on your oven so it’s preheated when you wake!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2014 08:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Anne in NC - 10 July 2014 07:39 PM

You might be able to even set a timer on your oven so it’s preheated when you wake!

Yep, and the fire department may ensure that you get up on time. wink

I’ve sometimes left broiler pans in the oven that started smoking when I turned the oven on without looking inside first. And I had a toaster oven catch on fire when heating taco shells because the shells dripped grease. It might be hard for a full-size oven to catch on fire, because the fairly tight seal does restrict the oxygen flow, but it could still produce a great big mess. I’m reluctant to have the oven on when I’m not around to monitor it.

 

 

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 July 2014 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4838
Joined  2008-04-16

I’ll chime in with the others, you can definitely bake bread straight from the fridge, I’ve done it with success.  The most difficult part is figuring out when it is fully proofed.  When the final proof is at a warm temp, you have a general guideline as to time and temp from the recipe, plus you do the poke test (ready to bake when it springs back slowly after a gentle poke).  But at refrigerator temps, how long does it need to proof?  You can’t really do the poke test successfully on cold dough.  You will have to do a bit of trial and error. 

For instance, if a commercial yeast bread recipe said it takes 2 hours for the final shaped proof at 80F, I would estimate that it would take about 9 hours at 40F, but that is just a jumping off point.  You may find that you need to test different lengths of time to get it right. 

Hope you’ll post back with your results!

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 August 2014 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  4
Joined  2014-08-10

I like to bake first thing, especially in the summer when it gets too hot for the dough and too hot to heat the oven. But even at the height of summer, it’s cool in the early morning. So after dividing and doing the final shaping the evening before, I pop the loaves (boules) in the fridge overnight and set Delay Start to begin preheat at about 5:30. I put a couple of Le Creuset (1.5 qt.) dutch ovens into the cold oven to preheat along with the oven itself. Then in the morning, I get up once the oven is ready, score the bread and put it into the DO. 20 minutes covered, 15-20 minutes uncovered, and its oven spring really opens the scoring beautifully. Better than I ever get with the convoluted “steam techniques” I employ.

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top
 
‹‹ Bread Makers      Sourdough Rye and Ankarsrum ››