Is the mousseline buttercream supposed to be thin?
Posted: 19 December 2008 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I just finished making the mousseline buttercream. It came out a little on the thin side. Is it supposed to be that way or did I do something wrong?

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Posted: 19 December 2008 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It’s not thin as in fluid, but if yours is thin, it could be that you didn’t have the syrup at the right temp.  Usually it is the consistency of something like mayonnaise, thick enough to spread or swirl.

When you add the chocolate, don’t add the choc when it is just melted - the warm chocolate will thin out the buttercream even more.  Melt the chocolate and let it sit for 5 mins or so (depending on conditions in your kitchen) and then add it to the buttercream.  And I’ve noticed some chocolates behave differently - my Callebaut is very viscous and a little goes a long way; while my Schokinag is very thin and I need more of it for a strong chocolate flavor but it thins out the buttercream a lot.  So your mileage may vary.  You can always add more chocolate ...

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Posted: 19 December 2008 05:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It should not be thin…it is frosting consistancy, and holds it’s shape when you pipe it.  If you add the liquor it is a little thinner, but should not be thin…as said in the previous post…you probably didn’t get the sugar hot enough.  it is a little tricky, but once you get it…it works every time.

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Posted: 19 December 2008 06:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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thanks guys Ithought maybe i didn’t beat it enough but now it looks grainy but hey there’s a first time for everything right.

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Posted: 19 December 2008 06:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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OK…it is supposed to be a little grainy before it is done…perhaps you are right and you didn’t beat it enough.  Are you using a stand mixer or a hand mixer?  I beat it for a really long time after each addition of butter, and I only add one or two tablespoons of butter at a time.  Good luck and keep working…It should be thick and smooth when you are done.

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Posted: 19 December 2008 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I use a stand mixer would a hand mixer be better

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Posted: 19 December 2008 08:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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ashley, keep beating it!!! stand mixer works the best because you can walk away.

FYI you don’t have to start a new thread on the same topic. we keep checking if new posts are made.
jen

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Posted: 19 December 2008 09:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Ashley, we feel for you, as it is the most perfect buttercream but also the most misunderstood to learn.  First, you need to make sure the sugar has been heated properly.  Second, when adding the butter, it starts by turning from meringue consistency to soupy and grainy (this always happens), then toward that last minutes of whipping it gets together into the most perfect frosting consistency.

If it remains soupy and grainy too long, it can be because the temperature is still too hot.  Cake Bible says what to do to fix this (refrigerate for a few minutes, then rewhip).

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Posted: 20 December 2008 11:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks guys I put it in the fridge and then rebeat it. It was wonderfull. I used grand marnier. I thought it was really good. My sister in law thought it was awesome. Which made me feel even better because it was my first crack at it. My only complaint was my cake seemed a little on the dry side and I’m not a pro so I really don’t know what caused it. But anyway thanks so much.

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Posted: 23 December 2008 01:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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ashley, every time i make a scratch cake it seems too dry to me, although the taste is superior to a mix.

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Posted: 23 December 2008 02:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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If you are making Rose’s cakes, and you eat them fresh, they shouldn’t be dry.  Be careful when blooming your cocoa in boiling water… if too much of the water evaporates, that would contribute it being dry - weigh your cocoa mixture before and after cooling so you can replace any significant amount of water if it evaporates.  Also, check your oven temp to be sure it’s accurate.

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Posted: 23 December 2008 11:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Many people are used to the taste and texture of a boxed mix cake; and when you compare a butter cake to it, the butter cake always is perceived as dry.  It’s been a long road for me as a scratch baker trying to compete with the taste/texture of boxed mixes.  There are a lot of people out there doctoring up a boxed mix with various things and that’s what people are used to tasting so they’ve come to expect it.  I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with it; so don’t flame me for it.  It’s a choice, and if you are in business you have to give your customers what they want and what sells.  When you bake at home, you have a lot more flexibility about whether you decide to bake something from scratch or just whip up something using a mix as a base.  Every day is different and it’s nice to be able to choose.  My favorite cake from my childhood was my mother’s pistachio bundt cake made with a mix and pistachio pudding; then there was the upsidedown ricotta cheesecake thing that we couldn’t get enough of - you make a yellow cake mix, put it in a pan and then make some sort of cheesecake kind of filling with ricotta (I think) and then poured that over the cake batter already in the pan.  During baking, they switch places and the cake is very very moist (mushy?!) and there’s this dense cheesecake kind of “topping”.  I’m going to have to ask my mother about this on Thursday!

When I use a soaking syrup in the butter cake layers, I get positive feedback; when I don’t use it, the response is muted.

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Posted: 23 December 2008 11:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Another thing… butter cakes are best eaten at room temperature.  If served cold, the butter will harden and give the impression that the layer is dry.

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Posted: 24 December 2008 11:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Thanks for the input. The cake was a a little on the cold side, It had to travel for a couple of hours and it was rather warm so I put it in a cooler to keep the frosting from getting to soft, I didn’t realize that it would hold up as well as it did. But now I know for future reference. Thanks for the help and I’ll keep on trying

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