whats it called? very thin layered cake
Posted: 03 January 2009 05:03 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi
Several years ago I baked a cake that was baked in several very thin layers each about 1/8 of an inch thick. Each layer took about 5 mins to bake and you would bake 1 layer pour batter over it for the next layer bake it repeat till you had around 10 layers ...I want to make this cake again but I don’t remember what it was called and I can’t find a recipe for it.
Can anyone help be by giving me the name and recipe please…

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Posted: 03 January 2009 06:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Blueriverrose - 03 January 2009 09:03 PM

Hi
Several years ago I baked a cake that was baked in several very thin layers each about 1/8 of an inch thick. Each layer took about 5 mins to bake and you would bake 1 layer pour batter over it for the next layer bake it repeat till you had around 10 layers ...I want to make this cake again but I don’t remember what it was called and I can’t find a recipe for it.
Can anyone help be by giving me the name and recipe please…

Sounds like Baumkuchen.

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Posted: 03 January 2009 07:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I looked Baumkuchen up on google and yes it’s very close to what I made but not the same mine was baked in a pan not on a spit
but I did find where someone had made a Baumkuchen in a pan and baked it under the broiler this might work for me thank you for your reply

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Posted: 03 January 2009 07:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Blueriverrose - 03 January 2009 11:22 PM

I looked Baumkuchen up on google and yes it’s very close to what I made but not the same mine was baked in a pan not on a spit

The spit is traditional, but I think most people who bake it do so in a pan, because that’s what they have.  I have a couple of baking books that have the recipe, but none use a spit.

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Posted: 04 January 2009 12:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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The first thing I thought of was a Dobosh Torte.

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Posted: 04 January 2009 12:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dobosh Torte is exactly what I was thinking too.

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Posted: 04 January 2009 10:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Sherry Yard has a Baumkuchen recipe in one of her books.  Sorry, I returned it to the library so I don’t have the details, but it is the book in which she has her buttermilk birthday cupcakes (the ones that seem to fall for many who bake them…).

Good Luck

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Posted: 05 February 2009 10:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Sounds like a local Malay/Singaporean/Indonesian cake Kueh Lapis.  It’s a rich, moist butter cake baked in a square or rectangular pan.  You start with one thin layer, bake it for 5 minutes, pour on a second thin layer of batter, bake again, and so on till you have about 10-20 very thin layers.  It was brought to this region by European (Dutch???) colonizers so it’s definitely a European cake.  It doesn’t have any filling between layers.  So yummy but so fattening!

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Posted: 04 May 2009 07:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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A doberge cake?

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Posted: 26 August 2009 12:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Somebody alerted me to this thread - I believe what you are looking for is a Baumkuchen. I’ve just made one as a bottom layer for a wedding cake. The recipe I used is from a famous German chef, Johann Lafer, but it’s very very similar to one that’s been in our family for a long time. It is as follows (sorry for all the European measurements):

220 g butter at room temperature
100 g powdered sugar
1 vanilla pod - seeds scraped out
1 tbsp rum - I usually substitute with rose water or orange blossom water
pinch of salt
6 egg yolks
150 g marzipan or almond paste - whichever has more almonds and less sugar
50 ml milk
6 egg whites
120 g sugar
90 g pastry flour
80 g starch

Preheat broiler to 500 F. Put rack in the upper 3rd of the oven. Butter an 8” pan very well, especially the bottom. (I like to stick in in the freezer for a few minutes)
Whip butter, powdered sugar, vanilla seeds, rum, and salt. Add the egg yolks, beating after each addition. Heat the marzipan with the milk slightly, until the marzipan can be smoothened out.
Beat the egg whites with the sugar until they form stiff peaks.
Carefully fold 1/3 of the egg whites into the butter mixture, followed by half the sifted flour / starch mixture, 1/3 of the egg whites, the remainder of the flour and starch and the remainder of the egg whites.
Put a very thin layer of dough on the bottom of the pan. Stick it under the broiler until golden, about 2-3 minutes. Add next layer, again very thin, so that you can almost see the layer before. You should get about 20 layers of dough, about 1.5” high. After the last layer is done, cover with aluminum foil, lower oven temperature to 350 and bake for another 5 minutes.
Let the cake cool for about 10 minutes. Invert onto rack.
I like my cake with a thin layer of apricot jam or - even better - TCB’s apricot puree (put on when warm), and then with a thin layer of chocolate once the cake is cold. It’s taste improves over the next few days.

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