sunshine cake
Posted: 20 March 2016 01:09 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m in the process of untangling a recipe for Sunshine Chiffon Cake that used to be made by a couple of members of a Hawaiian family. Now all that is left are a couple of hand written recipes (basically the same) and a couple of people who were shown how to make the cake in the past but never succeeded. According to the older family members, it’s all in the bubbles in the syrup and the folding of the flower. Perhaps, if I could identify the type of cake, I could search some classic methods and figure out what goes wrong. It is called a chiffon but I’m not sure that is what it is.
Here’s the basic recipe process as passed on to me:
separate the eggs and beat until stiff
bring sugar, water, cream of tarter to a boil and pour slowly into egg whites with mixer running
slowly add melted butter to the egg white mixture
mix egg yolks and vanilla. slowly add to egg white mixture
sift flour over egg white mixture and fold in gently, just until blended
pour into uncreased tube pan
cook @ 350 for 15 min; lower to between 300 and 325 for 20 min

It is rather interesting. I’ve tried this a couple of times with the cake not maintaining even its original volume but always with a wonderful flavor.

What type of cake should this be called?
Any clues for what might be going on? syrup temperature? cooking temperature / time?

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Posted: 20 March 2016 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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DanK - 20 March 2016 01:09 PM

I’m in the process of untangling a recipe for Sunshine Chiffon Cake that used to be made by a couple of members of a Hawaiian family. Now all that is left are a couple of hand written recipes (basically the same) and a couple of people who were shown how to make the cake in the past but never succeeded. According to the older family members, it’s all in the bubbles in the syrup and the folding of the flower. Perhaps, if I could identify the type of cake, I could search some classic methods and figure out what goes wrong. It is called a chiffon but I’m not sure that is what it is.
Here’s the basic recipe process as passed on to me:
separate the eggs and beat until stiff
bring sugar, water, cream of tarter to a boil and pour slowly into egg whites with mixer running
slowly add melted butter to the egg white mixture
mix egg yolks and vanilla. slowly add to egg white mixture
sift flour over egg white mixture and fold in gently, just until blended
pour into uncreased tube pan
cook @ 350 for 15 min; lower to between 300 and 325 for 20 min

It is rather interesting. I’ve tried this a couple of times with the cake not maintaining even its original volume but always with a wonderful flavor.

What type of cake should this be called?
Any clues for what might be going on? syrup temperature? cooking temperature / time?


DAN K:
  Good afternoon: Welcome to our Baking forum. I think I can help you. This recipe you have posted has all the elements of a true “CHIFFON” cake. Including to mention not to grease the tube pan. (For easy cake removal) Dan, there are two ingredients that I believe are required in this style of cake. OIL like corn or safflower oil. Your recipe has melted butter in it perhaps that is the subst. for the oil. The other is Baking powder. You stated VOLUME yes Dan, that has to do with Baking powder…that is the WHY it isn’t maintaining it’s volume…I believe.

Dan, if you try this recipe after you do your stated research & you do not succeed 100% come back state all. I will then try to improve your findings & maybe we can together succeed & getting this lost recipe back to life once again.

Enjoy the rest of the day my friend. \

  ~FRESHKID.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: 23 March 2016 02:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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DanK - 20 March 2016 01:09 PM

I’m in the process of untangling a recipe for Sunshine Chiffon Cake that used to be made by a couple of members of a Hawaiian family. Now all that is left are a couple of hand written recipes (basically the same) and a couple of people who were shown how to make the cake in the past but never succeeded. According to the older family members, it’s all in the bubbles in the syrup and the folding of the flower. Perhaps, if I could identify the type of cake, I could search some classic methods and figure out what goes wrong. It is called a chiffon but I’m not sure that is what it is.
Here’s the basic recipe process as passed on to me:
separate the eggs and beat until stiff
bring sugar, water, cream of tarter to a boil and pour slowly into egg whites with mixer running
slowly add melted butter to the egg white mixture
mix egg yolks and vanilla. slowly add to egg white mixture
sift flour over egg white mixture and fold in gently, just until blended
pour into uncreased tube pan
cook @ 350 for 15 min; lower to between 300 and 325 for 20 min

It is rather interesting. I’ve tried this a couple of times with the cake not maintaining even its original volume but always with a wonderful flavor.

What type of cake should this be called?
Any clues for what might be going on? syrup temperature? cooking temperature / time?

An author may describe and/or label cake as she or he envisions the recipe. For me, the Chiffon cake should have all of these factors:
1. The eggs are seperated.
2. The cake contains a fairly amount of oil and liquid.

According to what you said, I don’t call that a chiffon cake. Some of people think that the cake, which calls for folding beaten egg whites into egg yolk mixture, is Chiffon cake; but it’s not true. It can be Biscuit, or at least Sponge Cake. Your recipe doesn’t have a fairly amount of water (most of water in the syrup evaporated when they were cooked), and the egg whites were not even folded in the egg yolks.

I think you can call that recipe a Sponge cake, but not Chiffon.
P/S: I don’t understand why they add butter to the egg whites?????

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Posted: 23 March 2016 08:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I didn’t think that the method made it a chiffon cake either but, on the other hand, it is from HI and lots of things have different names there.

It seems as though (about a million years ago) I saw a method something like this but have no idea what it was. It rings a bell that the cake method started with with an (or almost an) Italian merengue and proceeded from there adding and mixing things. I thought that this method might work for the sunshine cake (called chiffon or not). This is why I was searching for a name for the type of this mixing method.Of course, I could be totally off base.

I’m pretty sure that the ingredients and the mixing method is correct for the cake. I’ve gotten the same story on the method and the same ingredients from two lines of the family, each that had a person who made “wonderful” sunshine cakes. I’m checking to see if anyone else has tried it or used to make it. So far, the ones that made it have passed on and the ones that tried to learn never succeed in baking as nearly good a cake as the previous generation or even one that worked.

Supposedly the “secret” is how fast and how big the bubbles are rising through the sugar syrup when it is added to the stiff egg whites. I have a couple of ideas that I’m going to try later (perhaps tonight) to see if they help the results.

Meanwhile, I’ve got some additional feelers out the other parts of the family to see if anyone else remembers anything or has an additional copy of the recipe.

I’ll keep you posted as things move along. 

Maybe I should get a deerstalker hat and magnifying glass instead of an apron.

 

 

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Posted: 04 April 2016 01:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I did find a recipe with a similar technique - MILDRED KNOPF’S ORANGE PUFF CAKE, though it doesn’t call for the butter. Apparently this style of cake had some following in the middle of the last century though I have not come up with any more similar recipes.

Here’s what I have come up with for the cake recipe after a few tries and technique adjustments, like the temperature of the sugar mixture. It works consistently - at least for a couple of times now.  I have another of other small change or two in technique to try to see if it makes any difference. The results, according to those who have eaten the “real” version many times, are quite good—almost as good as “auntie’s”.  The directions are simple but seem to work.

I used my Kitchen Aid stand mixer and an aluminum tube pan. Read through the recipe before starting.

Sunshine Chiffon Cake (or so named).

7 large eggs separated
Beat Whites until stiff — almost dry

Bring to a boil — 242 F
1 ½ c. sugar
½ c. water
1 t. cream of tartar
Pour into egg whites with mixer running — pour slowly down edge of mixer bowl

Add to egg white mixture with mixer running
1 block melted butter

Add to egg white - butter mixture with mixer running:
(mix together before adding):
7 egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla

Stop mixer.

sift 1 c. AP flour over mixture and fold in gently by hand

pour into tube pan

bake at 350 for 35 - 40 min

invert pan to cool before serving.

Thanks for the comments for my research.

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