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Posted: 14 January 2009 02:51 PM   [ Ignore ]
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So I need to make a cake for saturday this weekend, i plan on making the choc. fudge cake that in TCB. Its the first recipe out of TCB that i am making so I am excited!
Here’s my question…I am running out of time in my life lol, so I want to make this cake (its gonna be a round 2 layer cake normal size) tonight, so I am thinking about freezing the layers and then frosting/decorating on friday night to serve on saturday.

here’s my questions
1) Do I just wrap these layers in plastic wrap and throw them in the freezer?
2) When I take them out on friday night, should I syrup them? (I’ve never made this choc fudge cake so I have no idea what its like).

oh yeah, and if i do need to syrup i assume it says how much in the cake bible, right? Can i just use a brush for this? And do i do both sides?

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Posted: 14 January 2009 05:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Wrap air tight and throw them in the freezer!.  I usually use plastic wrap, then aluminum foil and then a zip lock bag (I’m a little obsessive).

No syrup is necessary for this cake, it is very very moist and delicious.

Good luck.

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Posted: 14 January 2009 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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on second thought, If you are making them tonight (Tuesday) to serve on Saturday…That is only 4 days.  If you really wrap them well, and put them in the fridge, you may not need to freeze.  Check in the margin of the recipe in the cake bible, it will tell you how long you can keep each cake at room temp, in the fridge, and in the freezer.

I love this cake, I hope you will too.

I frost it with the mousseline buttercream to which I add 8 ounces of melted bittersweet chocolate and 1/3 cup of cocoa powder.

Good luck and let us know how you frost it and how it comes out.

Bill

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Posted: 14 January 2009 07:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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ok so this sucks….
I made the cake and they cracked on top. at first they looked really nice after 20 minutes, but i tested them and they weren’t done. So i put 5 more minutes on, and then they were all cracked.  I took them out, and they just look so ugly lol.
My cakes usually don’t crack so I am confused. I followed the directions exactly….it says in the back of the book they crack because you overbeat or your oven is too hot. I don’t think I overmixed because like I said I followed exactly. I didnt THINK my oven cooked too hot….but maybe I am wrong. I dont know, now i am worried that its gonna taste all dry now.

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Posted: 14 January 2009 07:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Bummer, but a little crack here or there isn’t too bad - you may find the cracks are not noticeable after the layers “settle” for a few hours.  What kind of cracks are we talking about?  If needed, a touch of chocolate buttercream or ganache will glue your layer back together.  Also, it’s a good idea to work with cold layers (chilled or frozen), which are much easier to handle.  I LOVE the chocolate fudge cake and don’t think you need any syrup for it at all.  I would definitely wrap extremely well (chill first so you don’t smoosh when wrapping) and freeze if you don’t plan to assemble the cake for a few days. 

Get yourself an inexpensive oven thermometer… it will make all the difference in your baking.

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Posted: 14 January 2009 08:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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well they rose and cracked like a mountain has cracks in it lol. When i took them out of the pan, the bottom of the cakes looked beautiful. Its the tops of the cakes that look bad. and they developed a little ‘lip’ on the sides of them…I probably should get an oven thermometer.  I probably will just cut the tops off anyways (i like layers flat), so I will do that after I thaw them, I guess I am just worried that the cake is going to be dry.

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Posted: 14 January 2009 08:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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oh and i just chekced them, they are cool now and they sunk in the middle. one of them sunk a lot. The other not so bad. GRRRR really frustrating

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Posted: 14 January 2009 09:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Sinking in the middle means not done baking…  uneven sinking means your pans probably weren’t filled evenly… your oven might be heating unevenly too, good idea for you to rotate your pans half way through baking, and I think an oven thermometer is a must.  Might want to think about insulated baking strips too - they really help to make even layers.  Don’t worry, we’ve all been in your shoes… just keep trying, you’ll get the results you desire with a bit of knowledge and a little more practice.

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Posted: 15 January 2009 12:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I concur with Patrincia—invest in some insulated baking strips. They really help cake layers bake evenly. Also, consider keeping a pizza stone on the bottom-most rack of your oven. The pizza stone helps to regulate the heat of the oven. I use a laser-digital thermometer to check the temperature of my oven (the manufacturer is Cen-Tech.)

I also agree with Bill’s original post about freezing the layers well-wrapped, as he instructs. I am a big believer in freezing cake layers. They are much easier to manipulate when they are frozen, and they keep well frozen.

Have you tried a scrap of cake? Does it taste good? If so, just put the cake together with lots of frosting. Frosting hides a multitude of mistakes.

Good luck!

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Posted: 15 January 2009 08:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Skiweaver, did they sink, meaning they flattened as they cooled but are more or less flat now?  Or did they sink, meaning they have a crater in the middle that dips below the sides? 

Most cakes flatten out a little as they cool, they don’t stay exactly as they came out of the oven.  If your cake is flat now, that’s ideal.  Just trim any large irregularities before frosting and it’ll turn out great.

If you have a crater cake, go ahead and cut it into left and right halves now and check to see if the texture in the middle is usable.  If the crater is not too deep and the texture suits you, just trim the edges a little before frosting.  If the craters are large and the cake is too dense and mushy, you’ll have to start again.  It sounds like your problem might be a too-hot oven, which caused the peaking/cracking and prompted you to take the cake out before it was totally done in the center.  You measured carefully, beat for the correct amount of time, and didn’t make any suubstitutions, right? 

And definitely use cake strips (you can make your own out of wet paper towels and foil) and wrap just as Bill suggests.

Good Luck!

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Posted: 15 January 2009 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Well the one more flattened out, and the other one sunk in the middle probably ALMOST lower than the sides.  I put them in the freezer, i am going to take them out on friday night and thaw them and then cut the tops off and taste them. I measured right, timed everything right, no substitutions.  The batter tasted REALLY REALLY GOOD. 
I didn’t use cake strips I will try that next time. I guess if the cake tastes bad then I will try it again.  Its weird though like it was underbaked but yet the bottom of it looked perfect..it must be the center that is underbaked, even though i did do the toothpick test quite a few times.

now here’s a question…why did they come out so bad, yet when I’ve made tons of cake mix cakes, i have never had this problem. I’ve even made other ‘scratch’ cakes and never had this type of problem either. WHy all of a sudden??

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Posted: 15 January 2009 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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SKIWEAVER#9:
  Good morning to you. Sorry to learn of your baking mishap. I am going to answer your ???  you posed in your last paragraph.
The reason you didn’t expierence a baking failure when you employed cake boxes is because the ingredients in the boxes are properly balanced.
  In this recipe there is a imbalance of ingredients. Because of it Miss Rose chose to employ a different baking technique that is known as the
“2- STAGE MIXING METHOD”. It was pioneered by the Proctor & Gamble Corp. in 1942 to deal with what is commonly known in comm. bakeries as a"HI~RATIO CAKE FORMULA.
What that is is the weight of the sugar exceeds the weight of the flour. If you baked this recipe in a bundt pan, it mostly likely would bake…that is because this style of pan is very forgiving for out of balanced recipes & not so expierenced bakers.
I have my own way in mixing these style of recipes. In any event the aforementioned mixing method does work.
  At this point I will say this…I was not in your kitchen when you baked this recipe,& I know what you said about not “OVER~MIXING” however, a sure sign of OVER~MIXING is a sunken top.
  I hope this info will help you have more understanding about baking science & make you a better baker which all of us members wish for you.
  Good luck to you from Las Vegas, Nv. & enjoy the rest of the day my friend.

  ~FRESHKID. cool hmm

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Posted: 15 January 2009 01:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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you can also lower the temp of your oven by 25 degrees F and this will eliminate the dome in your cakes. i used to used baking strips until i learned this tip.

the burst of heat causes your cake to dome and crack even before it’s baked in the middle. lowering the temp will reduce this and allow you to bake the cake longer, ensuring that it is properly cooked.

you may also want to move the trays in your oven around. i find that cookies bake great on the top shelf of my oven, but cupcakes dome out. by adjusting the heights of the shelves and baking different things on different levels you can control problems.

jen

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Posted: 15 January 2009 02:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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if i overmixed then what step could i have done that at?? I literally COUNTED the seconds when it said ‘wait 20 seconds” etc etc.

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Posted: 15 January 2009 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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SKIWEAVER#9:
  Hello again. I do not if your question of Over~Mixing was addressed to me…  as you didn’t address it to me by name as I address it to you.  No matter, I will answer it as this post will be my last on this subject.
  Simply incorporate the wet mixture in 3 segaments like the recipe describes “BY USING A PLASTIC SPATULA”. Till you see you have a viable batter…it shouldn’t take very long.

  ~FRESHKID.

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