1 of 2
1
Mini layer fondant cakes: timeline & storage
Posted: 20 January 2009 05:22 PM   [ Ignore ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20

Hi all.  I’m just starting to enjoy baking and all my work thus far has been towards being able to make a wedding cake for my wedding coming up in September.  But my questions have to deal with storage and timelines.

Using my individual 2"x2” square cake/bar pan, I’m going to be making small layer cakes.  We want to use the rolled fondant with a simple buttercream as the frosting underneath.  (using a rollled fondant recipe I’ve found online and the buttercream recipe that came with my stand mixer…are there better ones?)

What type of filling is the best to stay out at room temperature the longest?  I’m guessing we’ll just used a flavored buttercream, but I’ve been looking into mousse and pudding based ones as well.

How long can a fondant covered cake stay out at room temperature? 

Does refridgerating the fondant covered cakes pose a problem?  If so, does leaving the buttercream or filling at room temperature cause a problem?

I have lots of questions about things with this and I was hoping to find a place to start figuring this out.  Thank you in advance for any help you can give.

- BQ

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 January 2009 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Welcome Brian and congratulations on your upcoming wedding!
Buy or borrow (from the library) the Cake Bible. You’ll find all the answers to your questions in the book.
Rose’s fondant recipe is a dream to work with and her mousseline is to die for. It can be kept at room temperature for 2 days and it holds up beautifully in hot weather.
Fondant covered cakes should not be refrigerated unless you have one of those commercial type fridges with low humidity. Do a search on the forum, the topic is covered in detail by more experienced bakers.
If you are planning on keeping your cake at room temperature for a long period of time, don’t fill it with whipped cream, cream cheese buttercream or any filling that is perishable.
I’m sure others with more experience will chime in with lots of advice and tips. Good luck.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 January 2009 07:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  324
Joined  2008-03-19

Hi Brian,

I am going to strongly recommend that you check out Rose Levy Beranbaum’s “Cake Bible.” Many of us who post on this board are biased in favor of the “Cake Bible” because the recipes are superb, which is why we tend to refer to her recipes when the subject of cake comes up. She discusses all kinds of coverings, including fondant (she gives two versions: one rolled and one poured) as well as buttercreams and ganaches. Her book tells you how long various coverings can stay at room temperature, and how long they can be refrigerated or frozen. Take a look at her book and perhaps do a test recipe or two in order to see if you like the flavor. For example, I am more partial to ganache frostings than I am to buttercream, but then there are other participants on this board who adore buttercreams above all. It’s a matter of personal preference, weather, and the logistics of how long the cake needs to be stored.

In general, ganache can stay at room temperature for the length of a party. Some buttercreams in her book can stay at room temperature for a day or more. Some of us (including me) have had great success with freezing frosted cakes and simply defrosting them in the refrigerator overnight. I did a post about my sister’s wedding cake (the thread was called “The Well-Travelled Wedding Cake”) and I talked about how I was able to freeze and re-freeze mousseline buttercream, both off and on the cake, without a problem. Fondant-covered cakes are a problem to freeze or refrigerate because of condensation that forms which then makes the fondant gummy.

Why do you want to do fondant-covered cakes? Are you trying to achieve a small petit four assortment? If so, I believe a poured fondant might be what you want, even though I personally have not made these kinds of cakes.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 January 2009 07:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  608
Joined  2007-11-27

I had several orders for mini wedding cakes last year (some were single cakes, two were two-tier versions and there was another order with three tiers). Test the recipes you are thinking of using; don’t wait until the week of the wedding to finalizing things wink  The Cake Bible is a really good place to start

The height of the cake is much shorter than the typical wedding tier.  The cakes I made were two layers of cake, one layer of buttercream filling.  I’ve found that a good size option is 2.75” round bottom, 2 or 2.25” round then a 1” round (this is usually like a thimble, if you can at all help it do a two tier only.  If you want to make life easier for yourself, do a single 3” round cake).

Work in stages.  Bake off sheets of cake, and cut them to the size/shape you want.  Assemble on the second day.  Put the fondant on the third day.  Have help so it goes faster.  Do a dry run with a dozen or so in order to get a feel for how it works.  You don’t want the cake layers to be too thick (about a half inch or so) because this is still an individual serving.  Use buttercream, not mousse or pudding or anything too soft or juicy as a filling.

This sort of project takes time, - the smallest quantity I did was 110 (of the two tier variety, covered in fondant) and it took me 15 hours just to put the fondant on the 220 tiers, stack and monogram them and put them into the client’s boxes.  I had 140 of the three tier versions and it took four days (these were buttercream covered, no fondant, thank goodness!).

If you are boxing the fondant covered cakes, you can refrigerate them if you cover/wrap them.  It is the humidity of the fridge that makes the fondant sweat and by covering the cakes (in a box) and then wrapping the box in a plastic bag, you minimize the exposure. 

Congratulations on your upcoming wedding!

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 January 2009 11:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20

Thanks for the feedback!  To the enjoyment of our separate groups of coworkers, I’ve been trying different cake and frosting combinations a batch at a time.  I actually stopped into a Barnes and Noble nearby here and was flipping through the Cake Bible.  Luckily my library has it so I’ll try out that recipe.  It was difficult until I came across this board to figure out exactly why storing the fondant covered cakes in the fridge was a bad thing, but now I know.  My concern was not being able to reproduce the humidity of early September in the low humidity weather with attempts at refrigeration now.

I’ll do a search on this forum but for a filling, is there a good way to make a chocolate/raspberry filling?  I was thinking of making the chocolate buttercream recipe I have that can probably last at room temp for a couple of days and adding raspberry preserves.  As you mentioned, with avoiding too soft or juicy, I thought either fresh or frozen raspberries would cause problems as the filler of the layers with the stability of the cakes with fondant on them.  I’m just super paranoid about serving slightly spolied food to anyone.  I’m guessing that the buttercream/preserves frosting would be able to last a couple of days, but other thoughts I was having were either pie filling or just raspberry syrup mixed in with the chocolate.

Thanks!  You are all so helpful.  I’m definitely going to be frequenting this forum to see where I can learn, and maybe pass on any of my experiences. (starting to keep a log of it now)

Oh, and to answer your question about why fondant covered cakes: It’s just the current thought on what to use.  We’re not set in stone and I’ve been working on recipes for the past 6 months or so to figure out what we wanted to do.  We came across some pictures of little individual fondant covered layer cakes that liked and I was trying to reproduce the picture I saw. (no recipes…was just an image we found on the web somewhere).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 12:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  324
Joined  2008-03-19

On p. 276 of the “Cake Bible,” there is a recipe for a Raspberry Ganache that contains bittersweet chocolate and raspberry sauce, among other things. Check it out. It might be just the thing you’re looking for. The recipe says it will keep 1 day at room temp, 10 days refrigerated, 6 months frozen.

If you find the web pictures of the individual cakes you’re talking about, I’d be curious to see them.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 12:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20
Christine S. - 21 January 2009 04:11 AM

If you find the web pictures of the individual cakes you’re talking about, I’d be curious to see them.

I couldn’t find the exact picture I was thinking of.  Might have been in a magazine that I browsed.
Found some similar things though searching for individual or mini wedding cakes:
http://www.manxcakemaker.com/Elizabeth-Minis-72.jpg
http://www.traceyscakes.co.uk/images/latestdesigns/mini_new2.jpg

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  324
Joined  2008-03-19

Wow. Those are gorgeous cakes. They look like they are covered with rolled fondant.

When you first posted your message, I was thinking of the petits fours that one sees in places such as the Harry & David catalogs, which look to me like they’re covered with poured fondant.

Good luck if you make cakes like these. They look time-consuming, and very elegant.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1031
Joined  2007-11-21

just a note on Rolled Fondant.  If you plan on making your own and using the recipe in the cake bible…you should know that crisco has been reformulated since the book was printed…and if you do make your own, you should try to find a brand of shortening called Spectrum.  If you can’t get it at your supermarket, it is often available at health food stores…apparently it works better in the fondant.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 05:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20
Bill - 21 January 2009 08:35 PM

just a note on Rolled Fondant.  If you plan on making your own and using the recipe in the cake bible…you should know that crisco has been reformulated since the book was printed…and if you do make your own, you should try to find a brand of shortening called Spectrum.  If you can’t get it at your supermarket, it is often available at health food stores…apparently it works better in the fondant.

Thanks.  I may have to go back and redo a batch of fondant.  The recipe I had originally used which seems to match the one in the Cake Bible (from another baker’s blog: Zoe’s i think) doesn’t have shortening in it at all and even says in one sentence to avoid fat whatsoever.  The fondant hasn’t been too cooperative thus far (cracking at the edges, very dull finish) so perhaps this is from the small amount of shortening that’s missing.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2009 10:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

If the fondant doesn’t have any softening agents like shortening, glycerine or corn syrup, it is pastillage. It dries bone dry and forms a crust quicker than fondant does.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2009 03:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15

I suggest you make a couple of mini cakes asap and see if you still want to go through with your plan after that… mini cakes can be a real pain.
Have you ever thought about poured fondant?

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2009 04:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20
Patrincia - 22 January 2009 07:21 PM

I suggest you make a couple of mini cakes asap and see if you still want to go through with your plan after that… mini cakes can be a real pain.
Have you ever thought about poured fondant?

I’m going to try the mini cakes this weekend since the one flavor combination we may want is going out of season soon (Meyer lemon pound cake).  We bought the lemons yesterday, juice and zested half of them to freeze.  Going to make 2 batches this weekend, one with fresh lemons & zest, one with frozen to see if there is a difference.

As for a day to day timeline based upon answers in my other threads (tried not to pile too much info into one thread) & christine’s well traveled wedding cake thread, I’m thinking of this as a timeline for the weekend (as well as the wedding):

* Fondant was made a week ago, double wrapped in plastic wrap and stored at room temperature (RT)
* Future attempts will have the mousseline made in advance and refrigerated

Day 1:
Bake cakes, cool, level; assemble 2 layers & crumb coat with mousseline buttercream (flavor TBD), refrigerate (covered or uncovered?)

Day 2:
Apply another layer of mousseline (from the one thread, I’m thinking a thicker buttercream/thiner fondant combination), refrigerate slightly to help strengthen for fondant application, cover with fondant, leave at RT (each mini cake covered in plastic wrap and then the cakes loaded into a cake box)

Day 3:
Deliver cakes to the wedding venue in the morning, have them stored there, non refrigerated @ RT. (venue is air conditioned so maybe that’ll help)

Comments/suggestions.  Sorry if I’m missing something obvious here, but until the humidity is high again outside hard to know exactly what will happen I guess.

Thanks!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2009 05:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15

Definitely chill your buttercream covered cakes before you attempt to put fondant on - chilled fondant is pretty sturdy and can take a lot of handling.  Room temp buttercream is pretty soft and will easily smoosh while you apply the fondant (and it will get all over your hands and be really messy). 

Quick question - why are you planning on covering your finished cakes with plastic wrap?  Also, have you tried Rose’s fondant recipe?  It tastes better than most recipes I’ve tried.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2009 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  37
Joined  2009-01-20
Patrincia - 22 January 2009 09:10 PM

Quick question - why are you planning on covering your finished cakes with plastic wrap?  Also, have you tried Rose’s fondant recipe?  It tastes better than most recipes I’ve tried.

I just thought the plastic wrap would help keep the fondant a little fresher a little bit longer.  I took a couple small pieces of fondant yesterday, rolled them out (about the size of a silver dollar) and left one out in air and one in a tupperware container and as I expected the sealed was a little softer.  Thought the plastic wrap may help with that as well.

As for Rose’s fondant recipe, I have not tried that yet, but I will probably try it this weekend to compare the two fondants.  The recipe I have already made is very similar to TCB’s & used:
(from another blog)
2 pounds confectioner?s sugar
1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin
3 tablespoons cold water
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1 1/2 tablespoons Glycerin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2009 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15

I guess I’d be afraid the saran wrap might leave marks on the finished cakes or something.  Also, you run the risk of moisture getting trapped underneath it (that would eventually melt your fondant, but I wonder if a mild case of moisture would make the saran stick to the fondant?).  Some cakers like their fondant covered cakes to set so they are “dry to the touch” before serving - dry on the surface, but remains soft underneath (the buttercream will help with that too).

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top