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Mini layer fondant cakes: timeline & storage
Posted: 22 January 2009 06:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Patrincia - 22 January 2009 09:42 PM

Some cakers like their fondant covered cakes to set so they are “dry to the touch” before serving - dry on the surface, but remains soft underneath (the buttercream will help with that too).

Wow.  Great to know.  I had thought this wasn’t was supposed to happen.  The fondant then was perfect because it was dry to the touch but soft on the inside (probably a little more dry since it was just a piece sitting in air, not on any buttercreamed cake.  If the mini cakes come out as planned this weekend. I’ll definitely post some pictures (or have a lot more questions smile )

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Posted: 22 January 2009 10:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Brian - 22 January 2009 08:57 PM
Patrincia - 22 January 2009 07:21 PM

I suggest you make a couple of mini cakes asap and see if you still want to go through with your plan after that… mini cakes can be a real pain.
Have you ever thought about poured fondant?

I’m going to try the mini cakes this weekend since the one flavor combination we may want is going out of season soon (Meyer lemon pound cake).  We bought the lemons yesterday, juice and zested half of them to freeze.  Going to make 2 batches this weekend, one with fresh lemons & zest, one with frozen to see if there is a difference.

As for a day to day timeline based upon answers in my other threads (tried not to pile too much info into one thread) & christine’s well traveled wedding cake thread, I’m thinking of this as a timeline for the weekend (as well as the wedding):

* Fondant was made a week ago, double wrapped in plastic wrap and stored at room temperature (RT)
* Future attempts will have the mousseline made in advance and refrigerated

Day 1:
Bake cakes, cool, level; assemble 2 layers & crumb coat with mousseline buttercream (flavor TBD), refrigerate (covered or uncovered?)
I would bake, cool, level/torte the cakes and wrap in saran and chill them overnight.  Make the buttercream while you are baking or afterwards.  Make more than you think you need, you can always freeze what you don’t use.
Day 2:
Apply another layer of mousseline (from the one thread, I’m thinking a thicker buttercream/thiner fondant combination), refrigerate slightly to help strengthen for fondant application, cover with fondant, leave at RT (each mini cake covered in plastic wrap and then the cakes loaded into a cake box)
I would assemble the cakes - do all the bottom tiers first, let them chill, then do the top tiers.  Take the bottom tiers out to cover with buttercream.  Take out only one or two at a time (this is where the extra pair of hands comes in handy), while one is apply buttercream, the other is bringing the cakes in/out of the fridge.

Day 3:
Cover with fondant, stack, put in boxes.  If you use the gold mono boards (they come in white and black now as well), put the cake on the mono board.  Use a loop of tape to secure the board to a larger half sheet board.  The half sheet will store 20 mini cakes on a 3.5” mono board.  Get a 5” height box if you can, this way you can close the box.  Use TWO half sheet boards to prevent flexing, otherwise some of the cakes can shift or tilt if the board flexes.

Deliver cakes to the wedding venue in the morning, have them stored there, non refrigerated @ RT. (venue is air conditioned so maybe that’ll help)

Comments/suggestions.  Sorry if I’m missing something obvious here, but until the humidity is high again outside hard to know exactly what will happen I guess.

Thanks!

If day 3 is the wedding date, I’d move everything up one day.  You want to be able to relax and not stress over the cakes on your wedding day!
Did you already say how many of these you are making?  If so, I missed it, and also the part where you might have said these are single tiers or two tier mini cakes - sorry!

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Posted: 22 January 2009 11:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Jeanne - 23 January 2009 02:31 AM

Did you already say how many of these you are making?  If so, I missed it, and also the part where you might have said these are single tiers or two tier mini cakes - sorry!

Thanks for the timeline advice!  Sorry for forgetting to mention some of the smaller details.  The (probably about 150) mini cakes are going to be single tiered with two layers.  What I’m planning on using is this Calphalon Individual Dessert Bar Pan to make 300 little individual square layers which I’ll then assemble into 150 single tiered mini cakes.  I thought it would be a little more accurate for uniformity than baking a sheet cake and cutting it into individual minis. (which I’m going to do with half the batter in one of the test batches to verify)

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Posted: 23 January 2009 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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From a time saver perspective, it is easier to cut squares from a larger sheet of cake.  Use a ruler and a very cold cake, and a long serrated knife (I have a 14” long blade).  This gives you the chance to put together several larger cakes, trim the edges and get level individual cakes from it.  The filling will be even out to all the edges (drooping corners is an issue with squares) and will make putting the crumb and final buttercream coats on much easier and faster.  Depending on how large you are making the squares, you can get a dozen or so from an 11x15 size pan.  With 150 of these to make, you want to use your time well and not get frustrated or tired making all those layers and then assembling them ....

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