fondant fake cake
Posted: 22 January 2009 12:25 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi ,
I am planning on making fake cake centerpieces for my wedding reception. I am new at fondant. I want to get some tips on how to go about this project. First of all, where do i get dummy styrofoam cakes? What fondant works best for this material? How will the fondant stick to the styrfoam? How far in advance do i need to make the ckaes to be able to have the fondant maintain a fresh look? I am using black brocade pattern on a white fondant cake. I was wondering if anyone had tips on how to cut a design out of a fondant sheet to put on the cake? thank you somuch for all your help!
~mj

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Posted: 22 January 2009 06:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Do a search for cake dummies to find various vendors; I personally like the quality of the styro from The Dummy Place in Connecticut.  Spritz the outside of the styro very lightly with a fine mist of water just before you put the fondant on so it will stick to the dummy. Cheap styro (with big, loose cells) will show under the fondant, so some people cover that with a very thin base of royal icing.  I’d rather get nice styro to begin with!

The easiest way for a newbie at fondant to get a design is to put a decorative ribbon around the side of the cake (either in the middle, just below the top edge or at the bottom). You could also buy a stencil to use, but you will want to practice that to get the clean lines you need and with a dark royal icing, that will take some practice in getting the right consistency of icing and pulling the stencil away.

If you use fondant cut outs, it’s easiest to start with precolored fondant (from either Cal-Java or Satin Ice, both will dry very quickly once rolled, so cover the exposed part with plastic wrap while you work on another part).  Use cutters if you can find ones in a pattern you like or create a pattern from different cutters - apply when the black fondant is still pliable - don’t cut all the pieces for all the cakes and then go back to apply them.  Cut and apply pieces to sections of the cake as you go.

Give yourself a lot of time; working with fondant, or I should say, working well with fondant - like anything - takes some practice.  You can start the dummies months in advance, just store them in a box to keep them out of the light (so they don’t fade) and away from dust and bugs.

Congratulations on your upcoming wedding!

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Posted: 22 January 2009 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Jeanne’s suggestions are all excellent. I would simply add that before you start covering the styrofoam dummies with fondant, practice working with it by covering the outsides of cake pans first. This way, you can remove the wad of fondant and practice again without getting bits of stuff stuck in it. The kind of round cake pans I recommend are the ones with sloping edges (not 90-degree angled edges of the typical round cake pan). Fondant doesn’t do well when it has to bend at sharp angles. Or, let me put it another way. I personally have trouble working fondant over sharp edges. Maybe better fondant artists don’t have this trouble, but if you’re new to the game, rounded edges is the way to go, in my opinion.

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Posted: 22 January 2009 02:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Did anyone address the question of how to attach the fondant to the cake dummies?  Spray the dummies with a light mist of water.  Rose has discussed cake dummies on the blog - do a search and you’ll find more info.

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