Non-Dutch processed cocoa == won’t dissolve into liquids?
Posted: 22 January 2009 11:44 PM   [ Ignore ]
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So I went to make a chocolate Genoise tonight, after a week and a half of pate a choux. My last Genoise was plain, and it worked out well. I figured hey, I got the hang of it, so off I go to my chocolate Genoise.

One catch, I am not using Dutch processed cocoa, aka, Alkalized cocoa. I sifted it with the flour, and when I went to fold it into the eggs, it just would not incorporate. It stuck to the eggs/sugar no matter how much I tried. And try I did, and when finally done, there was no volume left at all in my batter.

So it became clear to me, something about this cocoa does not want to dissolve into the eggs/sugar. I looked it up on some other sites that suggested Dutch cocoa may dissolve better. Any truth to this? I am at a loss at this point.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 12:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi!

In The Cake Bible’s ingredient section, RLB notes that the Dutch process makes cocoa more soluble.

That said, I’ve made TCB’s chocolate genoise with non-alkalized cocoa to get the cake to set better at altitude.  In this recipe, though, you whisk the cocoa with boiling water, then with two cups of the beaten egg mixture, before folding it in to the main portion of the beaten eggs and sugar. The ‘Understanding’ section of the recipe cites the difficulty of mixing cocoa powder into the beaten egg mixture as one motivation for the boiling water technique, enhanced flavor being the other. The result is pretty darn ideal.

Cathy

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Posted: 23 January 2009 12:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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cdurso - 23 January 2009 04:12 AM

Hi!

In The Cake Bible’s ingredient section, RLB notes that the Dutch process makes cocoa more soluble.

That said, I’ve made TCB’s chocolate genoise with non-alkalized cocoa to get the cake to set better at altitude.  In this recipe, though, you whisk the cocoa with boiling water, then with two cups of the beaten egg mixture, before folding it in to the main portion of the beaten eggs and sugar. The ‘Understanding’ section of the recipe cites the difficulty of mixing cocoa powder into the beaten egg mixture as one motivation for the boiling water technique, enhanced flavor being the other. The result is pretty darn ideal.

Cathy

Interesting. I guess I should buy TCB to find out the details, such as how much water one uses to boil. I would imagine it shouldn’t be too much or else it would dilute the batter. Plus I imagine it must be cooled or else that too would deflate the egg/sugar batter.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Yes, Dutch cocoa does dissolve better in liquid.  More importantly though, you should use Dutch processed cocoa when a recipe calls for it because there is a chemical reason to do so… you won’t get the same results if you use regular cocoa powder.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 08:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Patrincia - 23 January 2009 01:37 PM

Yes, Dutch cocoa does dissolve better in liquid.  More importantly though, you should use Dutch processed cocoa when a recipe calls for it because there is a chemical reason to do so… you won’t get the same results if you use regular cocoa powder.

Where do I buy it? Nobody has it, not even Super Stop and Shop.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 08:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi foodsmith,

  You can purchase Dutch processed (AKA - alkalized) cocoa powder in most grocery stores. You may find it near all the other baking ingredients like flour, sugar, and cake mixes. Hershey makes a Dutch cocoa powder and a few other companies, too (Droste, Lindt, Valrhona, Poulain and Pernigotti). I get mine at my local grocery store that sells it in bulk so I just buy it by the pound. As Patrincia has stated, try to stick with what the recipe calls for unless you have a trustworthy source of information that can tell you how to use the other type of cocoa powder (natural, AKA - non-alkalized) in the recipe. It’s called alkalized because it has had a chemical agent added to the cocoa powder to neutralize the acidity. The type of cocoa powder used will determine what leavening agent is used in the recipe and that’s why it’s important to use the type of powder the recipe calls for. Good luck finding the powder. I’m sure you’ll find it soon.

~Matthew smile

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Posted: 23 January 2009 08:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Monsieur P?tisserie - 24 January 2009 12:47 AM

Hi foodsmith,

  You can purchase Dutch processed (AKA - alkalized) cocoa powder in most grocery stores. You may find it near all the other baking ingredients like flour, sugar, and cake mixes. Hershey makes a Dutch cocoa powder and a few other companies, too (Droste, Lindt, Valrhona, Poulain and Pernigotti). I get mine at my local grocery store that sells it in bulk so I just buy it by the pound. As Patrincia has stated, try to stick with what the recipe calls for unless you have a trustworthy source of information that can tell you how to use the other type of cocoa powder (natural, AKA - non-alkalized) in the recipe. It’s called alkalized because it has had a chemical agent added to the cocoa powder to neutralize the acidity. The type of cocoa powder used will determine what leavening agent is used in the recipe and that’s why it’s important to use the type of powder the recipe calls for. Good luck finding the powder. I’m sure you’ll find it soon.

~Matthew smile

Yeah well Genoise doesn’t use a levening agent, other than air in the eggs. So I see no reason why I shouldn’t just ignore the absence of clarity in most recipes and just use it, seeing as how the non Dutched kind has caused me nothing but grief so far. Thanks for the tip. Seems nobody near me has it.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 08:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I buy my Dutch-processed cocoa from Penzey’s Spices.  I’ve found it in specialty baking supply stores, and some nicer grocery stores as well.  Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa used to be Dutch-processed, but they’ve changed the formulation to be a blend of Dutch-processed and natural cocoas.

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Posted: 23 January 2009 10:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Green and Black’s organic cocoa powder is Dutch processed. You may be able to get it at a health food store. That’s where I get mine. It’s a really, really good product. It comes highly recommended by Rose. I hope you find it. In the mean time if you want to make a chocolate genoise, try the Moist Chocolate Genoise in The Cake Bible (pg 132), it uses bittersweet chocolate as opposed to cocoa powder. Just a thought….......

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