Changing size
Posted: 29 January 2009 05:39 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi, I’m new here, and I’ve always wondered if there is any rule for changing the portions of a recipe; that is, if the recipe is for an 8” tin, for example, are there any rules so that i can use the same recipe for a bigger or smaller cake? Or do I just double or halve the amounts as needed? THANK YOU

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Posted: 29 January 2009 09:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hello Cristina,

    Welcome to the forum. It’s nice to meet you. If you have a copy of The Cake Bible you will find a chart that explains different batch sizes of batter for different sized pans. It can be found on pages 491-493 (US version). This question was addresed in one of my threads and also one started by Tracy.

Here’s the thread started by Tracy: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/795/

Good luck!

Matthew smile

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Posted: 30 January 2009 06:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thank you! I was just wondering if there’s any formula that you can apply generally to any kind of cake? Shall get copy of TCB ASAP.

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Posted: 30 January 2009 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Cristina, it is somewhat complicated.  For most cakes, you will need to have more structure in the batter in order to increase pan size, becaus the batter has to “hold iitself up” over the distance between pan sides.  For butter cakes, this means reducing baking powder as pan size goes up- this what the Rose factor chart in the Cake Bible helps you do.  For other cakes, like chiffon, it is very difficult to change pan size without drastically altering the texture of the cake.  For Genoise, I have had success just multiplying the recipe to get the right amount of batter to fill the pans 2/3 full for a larger cake.  I can’t recommend the Cake Bible highly enough, it will help you learn all of this.

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Posted: 30 January 2009 12:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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CHRISTINA:
  Good morning to you. Welcome to our culinary club & happy to meet you as well. I understand your question….The answer is YES!!! Christina there is a way to determine how to enlarge & or reduce a recipe. However, what member Julie posted to you about chemical leaveners & or Yeast applies but generally for very very large amounts. You can easily enlarge a recipe say 1.25% or 1.5% without very much trouble employing the same style pan (Round & same depth) or rectangle & same depth)
  Christine, The method used by prof bakers (Not all of them) is known as “BAKER’S PERCENTAGE “.
Many baking books explain it. If you have to do any culinary math & you need assistance post back There are many of us here that can & will help you with that chore.
  Good luck to you & enjoy the rest of the day young lady.

  ~FRESHKID. grin

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Posted: 30 January 2009 08:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Julie - 30 January 2009 12:49 PM

Cristina, it is somewhat complicated.  For most cakes, you will need to have more structure in the batter in order to increase pan size, becaus the batter has to “hold iitself up” over the distance between pan sides.  For butter cakes, this means reducing baking powder as pan size goes up- this what the Rose factor chart in the Cake Bible helps you do.  For other cakes, like chiffon, it is very difficult to change pan size without drastically altering the texture of the cake.  For Genoise, I have had success just multiplying the recipe to get the right amount of batter to fill the pans 2/3 full for a larger cake.  I can’t recommend the Cake Bible highly enough, it will help you learn all of this.

Cristina,

  Julie has made some very good points here. I failed to mention these things and that the chart in TCB I was referring to is for certain types of cakes. I can’t remember which types, though. I don’t have my copy of TCB with me right now. I also think TCB is a book that can’t be recommended enough. If you want to make cakes then this book will become your new favorite book!

~Matthew

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Posted: 01 February 2009 10:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I can’t thank you all enough! I just ordered my first copy of TCB, it will take ages to arrive, I can’t wait. I’m sure it will become my new favourite book, as fast as this forum is becoming addictive to me!!  tongue wink

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Posted: 03 February 2009 12:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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If I’m not in a perfectionist mood and the pan size I’m using is roughly the size in the recipe, I just multiply the weights of ingredients by (area of actual pan base)/(area of recipe pan base). I’ve done 9” round-to-8” round conversion this way, 8x8-to-9” round (no change!), among others. This works for Sunday morning coffee cakes and other times when mental acuity is low and a moderate range of results is acceptable.  This is for flat cakes. I wouldn’t try it with loaf pans or angel food pans.

Cathy

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