storing, transporting cakes…
Posted: 03 February 2009 09:06 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Question for you all: How do you store / transport your cakes? 

Usually when I make a regular say 2-3 layer round cake, i put it in my cake taker and bring it on. Now that I am making bigger cakes, i am thinking- how am I supposed to get this to the destination??

When reading TCB, it says how long cakes/frostings will last.. Everything always seems to last longer refrigerated (say, after you decorate it), so do you guys just throw your cakes in the fridge in a box or something??  I think i’ve seen boxes at Michaels, is that what you all use?? OR do you just recommend keeping the cake out in room temp before you bring it (This would be for say mousseline which is put onto a cake a day AHEAD it is suppposed to be eaten). I’m thinking if the frosting is only good for 2 days, then the cake HAS to be eaten within 2 days, or else can you put it BACK in teh fridge and it will last longer??

I bet you this post might be confusing lol.

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Posted: 04 February 2009 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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for a mousseline cake, I put it in the fridge till it gets hatd like a stick of butter, about 1 hour.  then I wrap it with stretchtight.  sometimes I put the cake in a box, then wrap it.  The idea is to keep it airtight

out of the fridge, I remove the wrap and put it in a box.  sometimes I wrap over the box with stretchtight.

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Posted: 04 February 2009 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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leave it in the fridge until you deliver unless you know they will be serving it within a few hours. two days at room temp? no. figure no longer than 8 hours at room temperature including the time it takes to come to temp.  Health and safety guidelines suggest throwing items away after 6 hours at room temp.

if this is a cake you are making and serving yourself then i would bring it to room temp before taking it to the party and put it back in the fridge after serving. 2 days guarantees that you won’t poison a client. but the cakes do last longer if taken care of. if the cake is for your personal use then you can be a bit looser with the times. we leave the cake out on the counter and it’s usually gone within 12 hours.

i buy my boxes from brp.com they don’t charge for shipping. if you only need one or two the bakery at your grocery store will sell it too you super cheap or even give you a box.

if it’s a tiered cake i just make sure it’s on a very supportive base and put it on a towel in the trunk of my car.

for a large, layered cake it does take a couple of hours for the insides to soften, so you do have to take it into account. figure on the 8 hour rule and do your math.

jen

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Posted: 04 February 2009 01:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I use boxes.  I buy boxes in bulk online for 2 - 3 layer 8 or 9 inch cakes (They are sequestered all over my apartment).  For anything bigger I buy a box at NY cake and baking or at the Broadway Panhandler (Local NY stores) and they have all sizes.  I’m a little obsessive, so I place the cake in the box, then put the box in a large plastic garbage bag and tie that shut so it is essentially air tight.  I keep it refregerated until delivery.

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Posted: 04 February 2009 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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ok great. I like the idea of putting a bag around the box, ill probably do that. I never thought of asking Wegmans for a box, I am going to try that!!

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Posted: 06 February 2009 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I can buy boxes from my local bakery.  They charge me less than $1 per box.  For less formal occasions, I just use any old cardboard box I have hanging around.  Definitely transport the cake cold.  I also like to put non-skid mats in the box under the cake, and under the box in the truck or cargo area.

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Posted: 06 February 2009 02:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Oh, if you have a bumpy ride, you can put a nice piece of upholstery foam under the cake to help absorb shock.

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Posted: 06 February 2009 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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yeah we know roads around here are big time bumpy!

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Posted: 24 May 2009 12:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Has anyone ever transported unmolded tarte tatin?  I’m going to make several of them for a rehearsal dinner and I have to deliver them earlier that day.  Would it be safe for me to unmold them onto cake rounds and box them?  Usually, I unmold the tatin shortly before serving, so I don’t have experience with this.  If it won’t work, I’ll suggest something else to the hostess.  I’m just concerned that the sides of the tatin could slip during transport.

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