Syrup Questions
Posted: 12 February 2009 01:59 PM   [ Ignore ]
Jr. Member
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  49
Joined  2007-11-19

I usually only use simple syrup on my cupcakes since it is easier for the exposed cupcake to dry out.  But a co-worker brought some leftover birthday cake from a local bakery that was super moist.  Below is a description from their website.
Chocolate Liqueur Cake - A rich chocolate liqueur cake usually frosted with a creamy rich fudge frosting. The richest and most moist chocolate cake you’ll ever eat!

It was obviously syruped and with the perfect amount for a simple birthday cake.  It was super moist and just getting ready to jump over the cliff to wet.  Probably too moist for a tiered/stacked cake.  And it was only 2 layers - probably too moist for 3 layers due to the instability after it was cut.

Do you guys use syrup for your butter cakes?  This one was more of a fudge cake than the standard chocolate butter cake.

If so, how much?  I saw an earlier post that said 3 cups for every 6 1/2 cups of sugar used but I was unclear on whether that was for the sponge cakes only or either type.  And I can’t remember what TCB states.

For those that do syrup…do you syrup while the cake is hot?  Some of the other cakes on their website stated “A lemon and butter sauce is poured over the cake after it’s baked” and “A raspberry liqueur and butter sauce is poured over the cake when it is fresh from the oven”.  I always thought you syruped while at room temp.

Also, if you fridge/freeze them, do you syrup before chilling?  Or after you thaw and bring back to room temp?

Does anybody have a favorite chocolate liqueur?  I know Godiva makes one but I have never tried it.

 Signature 

“If we couldn’t laugh, we would all go insane.” ~ Jimmy Buffett

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2009 02:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15

I bake my CB butter cakes within 24 hours of eating, so I’ve never added syrup to them.  I’ve been tempted, just to see what they would taste like, but I’m honestly afraid they would dissolve or fall apart.  That being said, I do make some non cake bible recipes (like pound cakes baked in loaf pans) that call for pouring a sugar syrup over the hot cake - they always turn out fine.

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2009 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-11-18

GOLFADDICT:
  Good morning. I am not certain if I understand exactly what you are seeking. However, I will try my best to give you some help. I will address myself to the end of your the 1st paragraph of your posting.

The “CHOCO LIQUEUR” as you described pertains to the cake batter itself I assume.  The frosting as you mentioned (rich fudge) is applied on the outside of the cake.
You are looking for recipies for a syrup that is generally applied to surface of the cake layers before applying frosting (like whipped cream or a buttercream or a rich fudge type) I will assume.
  I can furnish you a cocoa syrup recipe or a choco sauce recipe. Sauce is slightly thicker than syrup.  If you have the time you can get a larger variety of recipes from GOOGLE if you like…just type in “CHOCOLATE SAUCE & SYRUP” recipes for cakes.
  If you find what you are looking for let us know how it turned out for you. It may be a learning expierence for some of us amatuer bakers.
  Good luck to you & enjoy the rest of the day my friend.

  ~FRESHKID.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2009 04:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Jr. Member
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  49
Joined  2007-11-19

~FRESHKID

“Chocolate Liqueur Cake” is the bakery’s name for the cake flavor.  If I had to guess I would say they aren’t using a chocolate liqueur BATTER.  I would guess they baked a standard fudge cake and syruped with a chocolate liqueur infused simple syrup. 

I understand the frosting part.  I really wasn’t concerned with the frosting…it was a little too sweet for me…it was the standard cocoa powder/conf sugar frosting.  I would prefer more of a ganache than what they used.

I wasn’t necessarily looking for a recipe…but a specific brand of chocolate liqueur that other folks use/recommend.

But since you mentioned recipe…I think Rose posted a chocolate syrup recipe that she used for the fudge cake???

 Signature 

“If we couldn’t laugh, we would all go insane.” ~ Jimmy Buffett

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2009 09:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Here’s what Rose posted on the blog re moistening chocolate cake. I use this method and it is really great. I usually bake my butter cakes the day it will be consumed or the day before depending on the timing of the event. If I bake it the day before I always fill it and apply the crumb coat the day it is baked so it stays moist. 

Re the 3 cups syrup for every 6 1/2 cups of sugar, it is for butter cakes.

“the perfect solution to making my chocolate cake richer without being denser is to apply a ganache glaze to the interior of the cake. (you are going to LOVE this!)i’ve only done this on a 9 inch layer so you’re going to have to work out the proportions but it’s easy.
for a two egg recipe, use 3 ounces/85 grams of bittersweet chocolate 51 to 61% but no higher, and 6 ounces/175 grams of heavy cream.
when the cake is baked, as soon as it comes out of the oven, poke deep holes with a wooden skewer all over the cake and brush in half the warm glaze. actually i found the directions i wrote up for the 9 inch layer:
While the cake is baking, prepare the glaze:
Break the chocolate into pieces and process in a food processor until very fine. Scald the cream (heat to the boiling point. Small bubbles will appear around the edges), and with the motor running, pour it through the feed tube in a steady stream. Process a few seconds until smooth. (Alternatively, grate the chocolate, place it in a small bowl and stir in the scalded cream until the mixture is uniform in color. Transfer the chocolate glaze to a small bowl and keep it warm.
When the cake is baked, place it still in the pan on a rack and with a wooden skewer, poke holes all over the top. Use a brush to dabble half of the chocolate glaze onto the cake. It will take about 10 minutes. Invert the cake onto a flat surface, such as a card board round or plate, which has been covered with plastic wrap or waxed paper. Peel off and discard the parchment and poke holes all over. Dabble with the remaining glaze, brushing a little onto the sides of the cake as well. Cool completely, for 1 or more hours, until the chocolate is firm to the touch.
do let us know how you liked it. since you have so much time i’d encourage you do to a trial version.

Reply to this     Posted by: Rose Levy Beranbaum | August 20, 2006 5:22 PM #”

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 February 2009 01:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-11-18

ROZANNE:
Good morning. Thank you for posting that blog from Miss Rose. I made a copy of it so that I can apply same in my cake experiments. My favorite cake is the ” GERMAN BLACK FOREST CHERRY TORT”. Maybe I can apply this technique to this style cake
cool hmm somehow & make it come out better)
  This is what keeps me busy at times. Enjoy the rest of the day my friend.

  ~CASS.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 February 2009 09:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18
~FRESHKID - 13 February 2009 05:09 PM

ROZANNE:
Good morning. Thank you for posting that blog from Miss Rose. I made a copy of it so that I can apply same in my cake experiments. My favorite cake is the ” GERMAN BLACK FOREST CHERRY TORT”. Maybe I can apply this technique to this style cake
cool hmm somehow & make it come out better)
  This is what keeps me busy at times. Enjoy the rest of the day my friend.

  ~CASS.

You’re welcome. Give this a try, you will not be disappointed.  smile

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 February 2009 11:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Jr. Member
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  49
Joined  2007-11-19

Rozanne~

Do you do this for ALL your chocolate cakes?  It sounds perfect for the purpose of my original post - moist and fudgy.  However, I need to do a cookies-n-cream cake which I would usually pair with the All American Choc Butter Cake.  Would this syrup make it too fudgy that it would overwhelm the cookie-n-cream filling?

 Signature 

“If we couldn’t laugh, we would all go insane.” ~ Jimmy Buffett

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 February 2009 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  266
Joined  2007-11-18

I think this would awesome GolfAddict, but I would be sure to use a dark bittersweet chocolate (at least 70%) for the glaze to keep the cake from being too sweet.

Yum, I like that idea of the glaze.

 Signature 

Visit my blog: The Mile High Baker at http://www.milehighbaker.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 February 2009 12:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Yes, I use it on all my chocolate cakes if the cake is not consumed the day it is baked. The only chocolate cake I don’t use this on is the Chocolate Domingo cake. It is already super moist and rich. I think it will be fine on the All American choc cake. If you think it will be too fudgy reduce the amount of glaze you use. Don’t forget to post pictures.  smile

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 May 2009 02:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  10
Joined  2009-03-10

I know I am jumping in on the conversation late in the game but I was wondering if you should treat the chocolate ganache glaze that rose suggests like you would a syrup and apply it only after the cake has been defrosted or if you can do it before it is frozen. I wish I could serve my cake the same day it is baked but it is a wedding cake and I am the Maid of Honor and its just not possible… The wedding is in about a week and a half so I would love an answer ASAP! Also do you just scale it (the glaze recipe) up depending on the number of eggs you are using?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2009 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  597
Joined  2007-11-27

The chocolate glaze should be applied after you defrost the assembled cake; the glaze will lose some shine as it stands; but it will still look fine.  Rose has a picture in an early post on the blog about a wedding cake she made in a distant kitchen (it has chocolate sticks on it) and this will give you an idea of what it looks like after applying the glaze.

If you use a simple syrup on your cake layers, you apply it as you assemble the cake.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2009 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  10
Joined  2009-03-10

I’m not sure if we are talking about the same chocolate glaze. Its not an icing. I am asking about the one that you pour on the warm cake when it comes out of the oven after you’ve poked holes in it. The one referenced in the post by Rozanne above… (?the perfect solution to making my chocolate cake richer without being denser is to apply a ganache glaze to the interior of the cake.”). Is it not possible to use this if you are freezing the cake? Or can you put it on before and then freeze it? Or do you do it after defrosting? Thanks so much! Joella

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2009 06:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  597
Joined  2007-11-27

Sorry, Joella, I did misunderstand what you were asking.  I use a simple syrup for cakes, not a ganache glaze in the way that Roxanne does.  She’s probably the best person to answer that question, especially since you are stacking/tiering cakes with this method.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 May 2009 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Joella, I’m sorry I didn’t reply to this sooner. I don’t know how I missed it. Unfortunately I have never frozen cakes but if I had to, I would do it after I defrost the cake. Just my two cents worth.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top