Pound Cake Question - Can I carve for 3D teapot and decorate?
Posted: 17 February 2009 01:02 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Newbie here, both to the site and to cake baking outside my standby scratch chocolate cake and some decorating classes.  I am making a birthday cake for my MIL.  She loves pound cake and is expecting a decorated cake.  I am planning on doing a simple 3D carved teapot, and either using buttercream or fondant to decorate.  I’d also like to incorporate Rose’s White Ganache, most likely as a filling, as she loves white chocolate.  If I do fondant, I’ll use the ganache as the crumb coat instead of the buttercream.

I have a number of questions:
- Can I use Rose’s Pound cake recipe in a 6” round or 8” round?  According to TCB, the pound cake should be baked in a loaf pan or fluted tube pan.  I have scoured this site and the internet, and haven’t found much out there on the downsides to going with a standard round for this recipe - are there any? 
- If no to the first question, should I go with Rose’s Golden Buttercream cake instead? Does that have a similar pound cake taste since it is a butter cake?
- Will the pound cake taste OK with buttercream or the white ganache, or should I look to a different icing recipe?  I know pound cake doesn’t really need icing, in fact I made her a pound cake last year with berries and whipped cream that was really good.

I’m not sure if the pound cake request trumps the desire for a decorated cake.  If I can get a similar taste that will work better for the 3D carving and buttercream (which is her recipe), I think she’d be OK with it.

Any advice would be warmly welcomed. I have enjoyed lurking here reading all of your insightful comments and look forward to any help!

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Posted: 17 February 2009 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Welcome GG - I don’t recall anyone on this site mentioning baking this cake the way you’d like to.  Sounds like you’re going to have to take on a little pound cake experimentation to see how well the recipe bakes up in a 6 or 8-inch pan.  I would advise using a heating core to ensure the cake bakes evenly in the middle of the pan.  Please let us know how it turns out for you.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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GGLANDFRIED:
  Good afternoon. Welcome to our culinary club. I will only address myself to the question whether or not you can successfully bake the pound cake recipe as shown in the TCB in a round cake pan. The answer is YES!!! you can. The baking time may vary but you know that it will not be more than a few minutes at most. The amount of chemical leaveners most be adjusted…but not neccessarily so in maybe 2 cakes. They are both “NO MATTERS”.
This is what you are up against the amount of batter in the recipe is 23.25 oz. The amount of batter you need in a 6, in X 2, in round cake pan allowing for 2/3rds full is 19, oz. Same conditions for the 8,in pan you need to do a 1.5 X recipe…
  I hope this info will you help you make the right decision for yourself.
Good luck in your baking project & enjoy the rest of the day.

~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 10:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi there and welcome!

You can go with either recipe; I think the golden butter cake is a better match for buttercream or ganache fillings.  I’ve found that ganache is not “sticky” enough to let fondant adhere to it (it’s best to apply fondant to a cold cake) so if you use it as a filling, it would be ok; but you’d want to use a buttercream for the outside.  So if you use it between the layers, it might not be much of a contrast flavor-wise.  I like yellow or white cakes with fruity buttercreams like raspberry, strawberry, blackberry - I’m not so crazy about yellow cakes with citrus - to my taste the citrus gets dulled.

I’ve also found it is easier to use thin layers of filling between cake layers when sculpting a cake; so I will use 1.5” high layers with a quarter inch thickness of buttercream; it’s one of those trade offs you make in order to sculpt without the layers shifting.

Instead of a roly-poly tea pot, you could go for a taller, more shapely teapot, sort of like the ones you’d see on a sterling tea set where it is shaped more like a vase than a ball.  You could stack 4 6” round cakes and then curve the top and bottom a little more narrow.  Were you going to do a handle? I use gum paste for that (fondant is too soft), and I give myself plenty of time for it to dry.  And I make more than one in case I am not careful and break it! smile

Good luck!  She’ll love it!

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Posted: 18 February 2009 10:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thanks to all three of you who have replied!  I have modified my game plan slightly based on your advice and additional study of TCB.  After I re-read TCB’s Perfect Pound Cake Understanding paragraph (I love Rose’s detailed notes!) that recommends keeping the cake small to keep the melting texture, I did a pound cake test using two 5 1/2” round mini-pizza pans.  They seem to have baked quite nicely, but they dome (because pound cakes do that..) and I don’t want to lose 1/4 of my cake for each layer when I level for stacking. 

So, she gets two cakes!  The two test cakes will be topped with whipped cream and raspberries for her pound cake fix, and I will use the Golden Butter Cream Cake for the teapot.  I was really struggling with using her sweet buttercream on the pound cake because I think it will overwhelm it, so I think this will be a good solution.  I’ll go with the 5 1/2” rounds for the teapot also, so it’ll be a little smaller than I originally designed.

Patrincia - I don’t own a heating core, but it seems like every new cake project requires new tools.  Do you find it invaluable, or do you think I can use a rose nail in it’s place?

~FRESHKID - thanks for doing the math!  I want to go back to my old middle school and tell all the students that they will be using math in real life so pay attention!

Jeanne - Great advice - thank you, thank you, thank you!  I hadn’t worked with ganache before, and thought I had read that it would work under fondant.  Good to know it’s problematic.  My vision of the teapot was exactly what you described, tall and elegant versus squat and quirky.  I am planning on using gumpaste for the handles and spout, but haven’t worked with it before.  What do you think actual drying time would be on them? I know when I’ve modeled with fondant, it takes a long time depending on how big it is.

Party is next Tuesday, I’d better get working on my gumpaste and buy some cream for the GBCC.

Thanks again, I really appreciate all of you weighing in!

gg

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