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Better Buttercreams for Wilton Class
Posted: 18 February 2009 11:14 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve been using the cake bible for years and love it of course. For a
while now I’ve wanted to
improve my cake decorating techniques. I found it difficult to really
get the fine points out of your
book or any other. I need a teacher in front of me. So I decided to take
the Wilton Course.
It’s cheap and close by.

I love your buttercream, but it needs to stay cold to form any
structures. The Wilton buttercream recipe
(I hate calling it buttercream) makes stiff, medium and thin
consistencies, but it tastes, well you know.
I’m looking for a good alternative to the Wilton buttercream, especially
the stiff. I’ve been searching
cookbooks and the Internet, but I can’t find one that is both good and
has the right consistency at room temperature. I’ve tried the Wilton 1/2
butter medium, but it’s only so-so. I need good recipes for thin,
medium and stiff at room temp.
Do you know where or if there is such a recipes?

I’m looking forward to “Heavenly Cakes”

Thanks,

Mark from NJ

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Posted: 18 February 2009 11:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Mark, the best one from Cake Bible would be Mousseline Buttercream.  Properly executed where you bring the sugar to exact 248-250oF will be very stable at room temperature.  I do it all the time at my 80oF kitchen.  If you chill your hand in ice water during piping or rest the bag on some ice packs, to help keep the temperature lower for easier piping.  Piped decorations with Mousseline will keep its shape to up to 90oF weather.

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Posted: 19 February 2009 12:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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hectorwong - 19 February 2009 03:58 AM

Mark, the best one from Cake Bible would be Mousseline Buttercream.  Properly executed where you bring the sugar to exact 248-250oF will be very stable at room temperature.  I do it all the time at my 80oF kitchen.  If you chill your hand in ice water during piping or rest the bag on some ice packs, to help keep the temperature lower for easier piping.  Piped decorations with Mousseline will keep its shape to up to 90oF weather.

This doesn’t answer my question about consistancy, stiff, medium and thin.
I’m not chilling my hand either.

Mark from NJ

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Posted: 19 February 2009 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think what Hector implied was that you can use Mousseline (which is the recipe for Italian Meringue Buttercream from the Cake Bible) for piping pretty much anything you would pipe with a medium or stiff frosting - flowers, roses, borders, etc, you just may find that adjusting the temperature (i.e. chilling for stiffness) is necessary for certain applications.  I am not sure about the thin consistency, but I can say that I have taken some Wilton classes and used Mousseline for piping everything I learned in the classes.

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Posted: 19 February 2009 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Gia - 19 February 2009 02:05 PM

I think what Hector implied was that you can use Mousseline (which is the recipe for Italian Meringue Buttercream from the Cake Bible) for piping pretty much anything you would pipe with a medium or stiff frosting - flowers, roses, borders, etc, you just may find that adjusting the temperature (i.e. chilling for stiffness) is necessary for certain applications.  I am not sure about the thin consistency, but I can say that I have taken some Wilton classes and used Mousseline for piping everything I learned in the classes.

I’m going to try this buttercream, but I would like some recipes that don’t need a change in temperature to create different stiffnesses.
The Wilton recipes are successful because they work at room temp, they are dead simple to make and they last for who knows how long, but they taste
awful.  I’ve been using Rose’s neoclassic buttercream for years, but you need to adjust the temperature to get the stiffness you want and you have to
keep the cake cold to keep any decorations from wilting.

My challenge is this: A set of recipes that work at room temp or slightly higher; can stay good for a week at room temp without the decorations wilting; can be make to stiff, medium or thin consistencies without chilling, looks great (no ragged edges to flowers) and tastes great!  A one for one replacement for the Wilton recipes, but taste good.

Thanks,

Mark From NJ

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Posted: 19 February 2009 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks Gia for filling in.  YES, you can use mousseline for everything you have learned at wilton (except royal icing work).  Stiff, medium, and think consistencies are terms used for powder sugar based buttercream, when too stiff or too thin of a consistency makes certain piping difficult.  For mousseline, the consistency is ONE “fluid but holds its shape” meaning that with the same ONE consistency you can pipe all designs learned at wilton that calls for wilton consistencies.  It really is a dream to pipe, I don’t need to change the mousseline consistency from anything starting at plain tip #1 to large french tip #808 !!!!!!!!!!!

I keep my mousseline at 70 to 80 degrees, 65 works too, during piping, and I can pipe anything wilton calls for thin/medium/stiff.  Once piped, it won’t wilt until about 90.

Both neoclassic and mousseline have similar consistencies, but neoclassic wilts when the temperature goes above 70 or so.  So here is the difference.

But, I am afraid, NONE of Rose’s buttercreams will last 1 week at room temperature, and indeed “real food” does not neither!

There is a lot posted for mousseline on this blog, please do a search, I think you will find everything there is to konw about mousseline

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Posted: 19 February 2009 04:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Mark, the mousseline is stiffest is you omit the liqueur and minimize thin flavorings.  Using just extract to flavor it will keep it stiffest, in addition to temperature (which will always affect butter at least somewhat).  And make sure the sugar syrup goes all the way to 250F.

You can then add in fruit purees and/or liqueur to create a thinner, softer buttercream (my preference for eating!)

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Posted: 19 February 2009 06:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Mark - you may not get all your wishes with Mousseline (room temp for an entire week?), but I can assure you it is superior to the Neo-Classic buttercream in many ways - color, flavor, stability even in temps that climb well into the 80’s (it will be soft when you touch it, but it will hold its shape).  Check out the wedding cake section on the blog… lots of glowing comments about the wonders of Mousseline.   

Just out of curiosity, may I ask why you need a buttercream for stiff, medium, and soft consistencies?  I find mousseline softens quite a bit just with the heat of your hand, so maybe that would accomplish the soft consistency you’re after.  For medium or stiff, straight up room temp mousseline should do the trick for you.  (I suppose, if you absolutely had to, you could add powdered sugar to the finished mousseline to make it more firm, but that would be a major flavor and texture sin in my book)

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Posted: 19 February 2009 06:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I will try the Mousseline.  But if there is a good substitute for the crummy Wilton recipes, then
why isn’t everyone using them?
I’ve eaten a zillion cakes from bakeries for weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, corporate events, anniversaries, etc. that almost
always had the Wilton icing. I can understand it for practice, but on real cakes, YUCK!  Why would professionals continue to use
it.

Mark From NJ

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Posted: 19 February 2009 06:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The reasons why so many use the crummy shortening/powdered sugar type of buttercreams are pretty simple… they are easy to make, you can throw the ingredients together in 2 seconds flat, the ingredients are relatively inexpensive, they don’t require refrigeration, they don’t carry salmonella risks, etc, etc, etc.  If you do a little research you’ll find the high-end bakeries and celeb cake designers use either Swiss or Italian Meringue Buttercreams; never the other stuff.

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Posted: 19 February 2009 08:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Patrincia - 19 February 2009 10:57 PM

The reasons why so many use the crummy shortening/powdered sugar type of buttercreams are pretty simple… they are easy to make, you can throw the ingredients together in 2 seconds flat, the ingredients are relatively inexpensive, they don’t require refrigeration, they don’t carry salmonella risks, etc, etc, etc.  If you do a little research you’ll find the high-end bakeries and celeb cake designers use either Swiss or Italian Meringue Buttercreams; never the other stuff.

Unfortunately 99% of American doesn’t use the high end bakeries.

Mark from NJ

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Posted: 19 February 2009 09:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Hello, you all.

WOW I guess I learned alot just from this blog.

Thank you and keep on smiling.

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Posted: 20 February 2009 01:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Good buttercreams are dependent on butter for their flavor, so, maybe this is stating the obvious, but you can’t change the nature of butter, which is dependent on control of temperature for consistency.  That being said, I know that there are hybrid buttercreams that are part shortening, so maybe that would be one route to explore.  I have only used Rose’s, so I can’t recommend these specifically, but it seems like it might be an intermediate step that could possibly capture some of the benefits of each type. I think the Whimsical Bakehouse books have recipes for this type of buttercream.

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Posted: 20 February 2009 08:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Mark From NJ - 20 February 2009 12:52 AM
Patrincia - 19 February 2009 10:57 PM

The reasons why so many use the crummy shortening/powdered sugar type of buttercreams are pretty simple… they are easy to make, you can throw the ingredients together in 2 seconds flat, the ingredients are relatively inexpensive, they don’t require refrigeration, they don’t carry salmonella risks, etc, etc, etc.  If you do a little research you’ll find the high-end bakeries and celeb cake designers use either Swiss or Italian Meringue Buttercreams; never the other stuff.

Unfortunately 99% of American doesn’t use the high end bakeries.

Mark from NJ

Yes, true.  I was simply answering your question “But if there is a good substitute for the crummy Wilton recipes, then why isn?t everyone using them?”

Hope you have a good day.

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Posted: 20 February 2009 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Patrincia - 20 February 2009 12:57 PM
Mark From NJ - 20 February 2009 12:52 AM
Patrincia - 19 February 2009 10:57 PM

The reasons why so many use the crummy shortening/powdered sugar type of buttercreams are pretty simple… they are easy to make, you can throw the ingredients together in 2 seconds flat, the ingredients are relatively inexpensive, they don’t require refrigeration, they don’t carry salmonella risks, etc, etc, etc.  If you do a little research you’ll find the high-end bakeries and celeb cake designers use either Swiss or Italian Meringue Buttercreams; never the other stuff.

Unfortunately 99% of American doesn’t use the high end bakeries.

Mark from NJ

Yes, true.  I was simply answering your question “But if there is a good substitute for the crummy Wilton recipes, then why isn?t everyone using them?”

Hope you have a good day.

because so many americans are accustomed to a super sweet frosting and have never tried a real, cooked buttercream. Pat already answered the rest, it’s cheap and holds up at any temp.  Surprise surprise, the cupcakes at Sprinkles use a shortening and confectioner’s sugar frosting and everyone loves it. learn to use the mousseline. it’s the best in all ways and you will easily convince people to love it once they try it.  True, your piped roses will be easier to make the first time with a shortening based product, but no one’s going to remember how the flower looked once it’s melting in their mouth.  by the way, shortening doesn’t melt in the mouth…so practice, practice practice and know that if you are making a superior tasting product nothing else really matters.

jen

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Posted: 20 February 2009 07:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Dear Mark From NJ, I really don’t know what else to recommend, but not less than please try the mousseline.  Be sure to execute it correctly, the most important step is to heat the sugar to 248oF-250oF and keep it at that temperature range till time to drop it on the meringue (Rose recommends transfering to a pyrex).

We are eager to know if the mousseline can satisfy your Wilton demands, as I made mousseline for near 1500 people with my Hawaii Way cake!

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2007/08/hectors_hawaii_cake.html

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