1 of 2
1
Pourable Chocolate Fondant Thoughts Needed!
Posted: 25 February 2009 06:00 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

Hi—

My daughter is getting married and is wanting individual cakes.  I have this vision of torting a square almond cake, applying a syrup, filling it with seedless raspberry preserves then covering it with a pourable dark chocolate fondant.  Of course this is all pretty complicated for me so I need help!

I want to use a pourable fondant because I need to cover about 100 mini-cakes and fondant always looks so beautiful.  I have found a bunch of recipes that don’t sound very good and I want to try Rose’s pourable fondant but it is not chocolate.  Has anyone tried adding chocolate to the recipe?  My goal is to have 100 mini cakes that look polished and for the dark chocolate to compliment the cake.

Any thoughts or input on my idea would be welcome.

Thanks!

Monique.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 February 2009 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

The pourable fondant can be made with chocolate, but the thing is that it will crack when you move the cakes.  It’s meant for small things like petit fours and for the tops of eclairs.  I really don’t like it on petit fours, to be honest with you, too sweet.  But on eclairs, it’s just enough.

If you like the idea of a pourable chocolate for the outside of the cakes, you might want to experiment with a chocolate glaze or better still, a chocolate ganache with a little butter and corn syrup.  The butter adds body, which in my experience gives a better coating than a straight chocolate/water or chocolate/cream glaze, and the corn syrup will help to maintain the shine.  The reality is that it will not stay super shiny, it will dull a little as it stands, and with refrigeration.  Usually when I have someone who wants a shiny coating, I pour the glaze just barely a few hours before the delivery.  And I use two coats, letting the first coat sit for an hour or so before pouring the second one. 

Make a lot more than you think you need, and strain it periodically as you use it (to get rid of any crumbs).  As you work it,  it will become less shiny.

Practice making a few of these months before the wedding to see if you like the look, and if you don’t at least you have time for changes.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 February 2009 07:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

Thanks, Jeanne.  I was thinking that little fondant enrobed cakes would be fairly easy to handle.  Doesn’t the glaze stay a big sticky mess forever?  I just glazed a batch of cakes with the chocolate/cream/corn syrup glaze in Rose’s book (prior to getting this message).  The glaze was pretty but it seemed like you could see a lot of the imperfections in the cake.  Do you think that the butter would make a more bulletproof coating?  The wedding is at the end of June so I have time to experiment.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 February 2009 11:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

It’s not that the butter makes a more “bulletproof” coating, but that it gives it a little more body, and suppleness IMHO.  I have a flourless chocolate cake that is sought after (no, this recipe I can’t share, I’m duty bound to a previous employer) by a lot of people and restaurants, and when I used a choc/water or choc/cream glaze, I could see through it even with two coats.  This glaze, because of the added fat, seems to coat better.  You definitely want two coats for even coverage.  The first coat covers the imperfections, the second coat creates a beautiful, perfect finish.  If you were to be coating the sides with crumbs or curls or something, I’d say one coat is fine.

It’s a basic ganache recipe:  2# bittersweet chocolate (I use the callets or chip form, but if you have a block, make sure it is in small pieces so it will melt evenly) in a bowl with 8 oz butter.  Bring 2# cream to a boil, (and I mean a rolling boil) then pour over the choc.  When I need this for a coating, I add 2 oz choc to the bowl and add 1 oz corn syrup to the cream before it boils.)  Rock or shake the bowl a little to make sure the cream settles to the bottom.  Wait a few mins and then whisk slowly until it comes together. Use it while it is still fluid, but not hot (otherwise it will melt what you’re coating).

When I am glazing individual mousse cakes, I will line a full sheet pan with a piece of parchment, and use one of my cooling grids (the one with the narrow openings, not the one that has lines on it) on top of that parchment.  I unmold enough cakes to make a row on the short or long side.  Then I pour the glaze over, being careful to cover the entire thing (no gaps).  I continue unmolding and glazing until I’m all done.  For my flourless cakes, sometimes I have to fill in gaps with some firmed ganache so any gaps don’t show and it covers evenly and beautifully.

Then when the glaze is set, I move the cakes onto individual gold serving boards (also called mono boards) and then into a larger box for delivery.  If you are not individually boxing the cakes, use loops of tape in a large box and secure the mono board to the tape loop.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2009 02:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

Thank you so much for your thorough answer.  If you don’t mind a few words of clarification and further guidance:  2# = 2 pounds, right?  So for a coating, I would use 2 pounds, 2 oz of chocolate, is that correct?  How much is 2# of cream? 

As far as the cake is concerned, I presume that glazing a frozen cake is out but is it okay if the cake is cold?

In so far as a time line, I was thinking about baking 9 8” square cakes and getting 12 pieces out each for a total of 108 pieces. I figured I could torte them, sprinkle them with syrup, fill with raspberry and reassemble and freeze them about a month ahead of time.  It would be wonderful if I could cut and put the first coat of glaze on them, too, but would that ruin the cakes?  Also, if I need 100, do you think 108 is a large enough margin of error?  I figure there will be about 85 guests.

Again, I appreciate your help on this.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2009 04:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

Sorry for the shorthand!

2# is 2 pounds - if you are using the corn syrup, add the additional 2 oz
2# of cream is just under a quart (if you weigh the full quart,  it comes to about 2# 1 oz or so)

I would glaze the cakes after you freeze them, I wouldn’t put a first coat on then freeze then do a second.  Do both coats at the same time.

I think the numbers are fine.  If you are looking for perfect squares, you’d want to make sure to use the magicake strips so the corners are level.  The corners in a square have a tendency to slope down because they set faster than the rest of the cake, with the strips you can eliminate or minimize this.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 March 2009 05:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

Thanks, Jeanne.  I’ll make a test cake with your glaze next week.  I used Flo Braker’s Almond Butter Cake recipe from the Art of Perfect Baking and it came out beautifully.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 March 2009 11:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

2# bittersweet chocolate (I use the callets or chip form, but if you have a block, make sure it is in small pieces so it will melt evenly) in a bowl with 8 oz butter.  Bring 2# cream to a boil, (and I mean a rolling boil) then pour over the choc.  When I need this for a coating, I add 2 oz choc to the bowl and add 1 oz corn syrup to the cream before it boils.)

Hi—

I started looking at making this and I couldn’t tell what you meant.  Do I need butter and cream?  To use the corn syrup, I use 2#2oz of chocolate, 8 oz of butter, 2# of cream and 1oz corn syrup - is that right?  I guess I’m feeling a little confused because it seems like a lot of butter and chocolate to melt in the cream.  Please let me know.

Thanks!

M.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 March 2009 11:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

Those are the right proportions - just put the choc and the butter (you can cut the butter up into chunks or globs if you want, it helps to melt faster that way which is a benefit) in a bowl, boil the cream (get it to a full rolling boil but don’t walk away from it.  Usually I wait til it starts to rise in the pan, and then immediately pull it off.  One of my short-lived assistants walked away from a pot of cream put on the stove to boil.  I came out of the walk in to find it boiling over…. she had walked to the dish pit to wash something.  GRRH!!!)

Pour it over the choc and butter, tap or rock the bowl to make sure the cream gets all the way to the bottom.  Leave it for a few minutes then use a whisk to stir until it is shiny and uniform in color.  Then leave it alone, it will firm up overnight or over several hours depending on if your bowl is wide and shallow or tall or if you’ve used Callebaut choc.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 12:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

First I want to thank you for your time and expertise.  I can tell you’ve made a cake or two, Jeanne!  I appreciate you sharing your experience - I’m sure I speak for everyone.  I last question before I start on this:  If I make the glaze ahead of time, do I warm it or add cream to get it fluid again?  Thanks!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 12:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

If it gets firm, or doesn’t flow well enough to cover, put it over gently simmering water just for a few minutes.  Take it off the heat sooner than you think you need to, residual heat will help.  If you overheat it, it will break (you’ll see fat on the surface, and it might look grainy); if this happens, make a fresh batch (you can scale it down to 1# choc, 1# cream, 4 oz butter) and add half the broken batch.  Save the other half of the broken batch for another fresh batch later.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 01:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  28
Joined  2009-02-23

Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 07:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4741
Joined  2008-04-16

Jeanne, such great information, I loved following this post.  Thank you!

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

I agree with Julie. Thanks for the recipe and tips Jeanne, but most of all thank you for sharing your knowledge and time.  smile

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 March 2009 04:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

awww, you guys!!  smile  (where’s the smiley that hugs back?!)

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 March 2009 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15
Jeanne - 08 March 2009 07:24 PM

awww, you guys!!  smile  (where’s the smiley that hugs back?!)

3 cheers for Jeanne! 
smile

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top