fake cakes…
Posted: 03 March 2009 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi all,
I’m looking for information about making a few fake wedding cakes for display purposes. I tried searching already, but can’t find exactly the answers I’m looking for. Most of the information was about using fondant, but I don’t want to cover them in fondant. Can I just use buttercream, and decorate them as I would any other cake?? Do I still need to use straws/dowels, or atleast one dowel going all the way through the tiers for support? Is there something cheaper to make than mousseline, but still would look really beautiful?? Or, what is the best thing to use if I’m not doing fondant? If I’m transporting them (not huge—largest probably 10” base), is it okay to have them all assembled ahead of time, or is it like transporting real cakes and I should stack on-site?? So many questions…
Thank you so much for your time!!

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Posted: 03 March 2009 03:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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fakes hardly weigh anything and imo it makes them difficult to decorate but it also means you don’t need supports of any kind. i do run a long bamboo skewer thru mine to hold it together. use double sided tape to stick it to your base as frosting won’t really do it.

anyway, i use rose;s practice buttercream, but you can use any shortening based BC so it will last longer.

you could also use royal icing or a product made specially for decorating fakes, but FYI those products won’t come off your dummies.

if you have gumpaste or pastillage flowers you might want to transport separately and place on the cake when you arrive.


jen

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Posted: 03 March 2009 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’ve read about using plaster too, but I’ve never seen it up close.  Might have a hard time getting it off your cake decorating tools.

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Posted: 03 March 2009 06:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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How long do you want to keep the decorated dummies? 

One of my accounts used to cover a styro dummy with regular buttercream for the client tastings they had once a month.  They would keep for a day or two then wash them off.  Since they used real buttercream, they kept it refrigerated so the butter hardens. 

Depending on how long you want to keep them, you could use royal icing as pretend buttercream; knowing that it will eventually dry.  You could even sand them smooth once the royal icing dried - this is how the cakes in the old Wilton books looked so perfect!!  The royal icing will eventually attract bugs.  It can be colored with regular gel/liquid/paste colors and your usual tips and bags.

You can also use spackle, but this will eventually crack and discolor.  You should be careful not to use any of your tools for regular cake decorating with this stuff.  There is a specific fake buttercream made for this, I know of one called PermaIce - it requires separate tools, and special color (you can’t use regular colors with it).

Regardless of the method you use to cover, do as Jen does and run a long bamboo skewer or dowel to anchor them all together.  Make them in advance so they dry - at least enough to prevent any marring when you transport them.

If you end up using fondant, you should stick the flowers in while the fondant is still soft; once it hardens, it’s like a rock and nothing will penetrate it.  You’d have at least a day or two with the fondant still soft depending on what brand of fondant you were using.

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Posted: 04 March 2009 12:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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thank you everyone! one more question about using a practice bc…when it dries, will it look crusty and dried out looking? i’d love it if the fake cakes didn’t look fake, if they still looked like something that you might want to eat, if that’s possible. maybe just going with a real bc? i don’t need them to keep, they’re just to display for a one day event. i was just trying to keep costs down, and thanks for the tip on skewering the whole thing. thank you again, i always appreciate the wisdom on this blog!

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Posted: 04 March 2009 07:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Gee, I don’t know if the practice buttercream dries at all… I’ve only used it to practice piping over and over again, then I’d pitch it.

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Posted: 04 March 2009 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Patrincia’s right, the practice buttercream won’t dry out - or dry to the touch.  Neither will buttercream made with butter or a combination of butter and shortening; the place I mentioned before chilled the dummy so they could finish it before their tasting and keep it cold so nothing would get wrecked on it - until it came to rm temp smile

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