Wedding cake question
Posted: 04 March 2009 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi,
I am making my first wedding cake at the end of March. I am making a four tiered cake. Should I use 14”, 12”, 9”, and 6” sized pans, or would 12”, 10”, 8”, and 6” work? In the CB Rose says a traditional three layer cake is 12”, 9” and 6”......is it necessary to have a 3” difference between each pan? What looks best?
Also, the bride wants chocolate cake….what CB recipe is your favorite? In the past I have tried the chocolate butter wedding cake (pg. 486 CB) but it turned out very dense and almost fudge-like. Has anyone else had this experience? Maybe it had something to do with being frozen for a day before serving? I liked the taste of it…but the texture was not good.
Thanks!

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Posted: 04 March 2009 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi Kristen.  Either configuration you mentioned will work fine.  Wedding cake configurations are a matter of personal taste.  Actually many modern cakes are tall and not very wide (2” difference between tiers).  Just remember a 3” difference will give you 1.5” all around for flower placement, while a 2” difference will only give you 1” all around. 

As for the density of your cake… I think you need a pretty dense or sturdy recipe if your going to make a wedding cake, and dense doesn’t mean it’s bad at all… I don’t know why people think cakes need to be as light as air.  I think they are so used to the springy things that come out of boxed mixes that they don’t know what a real cake is supposed to be like anymore.  More important than the density is the flavor, and you can’t go wrong with Rose’s recipes when it comes to flavor. 

Freezing Rose’s chocolate butter cake shouldn’t have changed its density. 

I look forward to seeing your finished cake - god luck.

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Posted: 04 March 2009 09:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi Kristen, I would not call the all american chocolate butter cake dense and fudge like, I wonder if something went wrong…  Did you use bleached cake flour?  Weigh all ingredients?

In any event, if you want to try a lighter, more bittersweet cake than the AACB cake, try the chocolate fudge cake.  It is lighter, moister and bittersweet.

You could also consider syruping the AACB with ganache syrup, search the blog for details.

Good Luck!

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Posted: 05 March 2009 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The two configurations will give you a different look - it will depend on what you’re after and how you’re going to finish it (lots of fresh flowers or just one or two perfect blooms - the lush look will be better suited to the first size below; the one or two perfect flowers would look better on the second size.).

I would do a 15, 12, 9, 6 for something that is proportional - I calculate that this will serve 150.

The 12, 10, 8, 6 is a more columnar look, just as tall as the first, but it will look more “sleek” because it is narrower.  This would serve 100 in my book. 

I have a thing about fresh cake, so I give my clients a First Anniversary cake when they give me a professional photo of their cake; I encourage them to serve the entire thing at the wedding reception.  I also include a note to the function manager that explains this (as well as how many servings they should get, what the flavor is, the client’s name, any special information like whether they are saving the sugar flowers or not, removing the ribbon before serving, etc…)

As for the texture of the chocolate cake, if you didn’t weigh or measure the flour accurately, this would give you the very dense texture - you might also have had the oven temp too low or undermixed the cake batter.

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Posted: 06 March 2009 09:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thanks for the help everyone!
I think I will try the Chocolate wedding cake again. I did weigh all the ingredients last time.
I have decided to go with the 15”, 12”, 9” and 6” size. I am “scattering” fresh flowers over the cake, so I think the wider tiers will be best.

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