mousseline to crumbcoat under fondant?
Posted: 10 March 2009 01:21 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve done lots of research on this board and understand that Rose’s Mousseline will hold up as a filling between layers under the weight of fondant (I take this to mean, if well-supported, and using TCB’s White Velvet Butter Cake, a thin-ish layer of filling won’t squish out the sides and pucker the fondant).

But will the mousseline also be suitable as a crumbcoat under fondant? No slipping, sliding, sagging, puckering, condensing?

I will be refridgerating the crumbcoated cakes to buy myself 12 more hours, but will let them come to room temp before covering with fondant. They will stay at room temp, covered with the fondant, overnight, as I finish the decorating.

I’ve used the mousseline several times, and LOVE it, but it does get pretty soft at room temp…does it really hold up? As well as a shortening-based icing?

I can’t afford (financially!) for this to go wrong, as I’m covering the cakes with store-bought black fondant!

Thanks in advance for the always sophisticated and experienced advice!

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Posted: 10 March 2009 03:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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the key will be to always use a thin coat, almost just like a crumb coat.

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Posted: 10 March 2009 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I would recommend that you cover COLD cakes with fondant- put them back in the cooler or refrigerator to chill (overnight is good) if you are covering them with fondant.  The cake(s) will hold up much better than if you try to cover room temp cakes with fondant. 

Once covered, you can either box/bag them and put them back in the cooler/fridge to chill again (if you’ve used cornstarch and gotten any on the outside of the fondant, the chilling and subsequent coming to rm temp will “erase” the white cornstarch.  There’s a lot of commentary about whether or not you can/should refrigerate a fondant covered cake; your mileage may vary.  It will depend on your schedule, the type (brand) of fondant and whether you take care of the cakes by bagging them to protect them from the humidity in the refrigerator. 

The key to a good covering with fondant is to roll it out larger than you need so you don’t have to stretch or coax it too much (that’s what gives you wrinkles).

The only type of buttercream I use in my bakeshop is mousseline, aka Italian Meringue Buttercream.  I use an Ateco #8 tube to fill cake layers with the buttercream, and it holds up fine.  I use two thin coats of buttercream on the outside and it works perfectly with fondant.  Take care to make sure there are no gaps, and the sides and top are even (no slopes unless that’s part of the design).

Are you using Cal-Java or Satin Ice brand of black fondant?

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Posted: 10 March 2009 08:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks so much Hector and Jeanne!

I’ll be using Satin Ice’s black fondant…

I’ve read lots of warnings about the “bleeding” of the black—and red—into other colors due to condensation, which was why I was going to aim for room temp cakes before covering. Of course…the design of the cake is a black base, decorated with white pearls, red roses, and a layered white-on-red ribbon wrapping around the bottom tier.

Due to the fussy-ness of the colors, I think I’ll opt not to refrigerate, but I will try the thin coat of Mousseline.

Again…thank you! Feel free to add any advice you might find helpful—this will be my biggest cake yet, and I’m still determining my prep timeline!

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Posted: 10 March 2009 08:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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The colored fondant from Satin Ice tends to dry quickly - if you cut some fondant and don’t bag it back up immediately, the edges will dry and crust - even in as few a 3 minutes!  If you try to knead any of the dry parts into the soft fondant, the dry lumps will show up on the surface of your covered cake.  When it happens to me, I just cut the dry part away; I made the mistake of just kneading it in once, and it wrecked the smooth look because while the dry lumps didn’t really show up when I rolled it out, they showed once it was on the cake. 

Good luck on your cake, sounds like a beautiful design!

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