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another ganache question
Posted: 18 March 2009 09:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I am going to try the ganache again this weekend. one quick thing- since i dont have a food processor, I will chop up the chocolate and then put the heavy cream on the stove. Once it reaches boil, do you suggest I put it in a bowl with the chocolate and use my mixer? Or do I just use a whisk and mix it by hand??

ALso, it says it takes hours to reach frosting consistency, so I plan on making it and night and using it the next day. Do I just cover it after I make it and throw it in the fridge overnight?

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Posted: 18 March 2009 10:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Ski,

I just made the ganache last night! It is sooo yummy. TCB says it is good at room temp for 3 days, so I covered mine and left it on the counter overnight. It’s nice and smooth and just the right consistency for icing the cake now - no bringing up to room temp needed. I’ll let someone else answer about the mixing method.

Have fun with it!

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Posted: 18 March 2009 10:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Just use a whisk and mix it by hand - super easy.  Add the cream just when it starts to bubble around the edges of the pan (scalding).  You are going to LOVE the way it tastes!

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Posted: 18 March 2009 10:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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alright now my mouth is watering.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 12:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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skiweaver9, make sure you wait until your ganache is completely cooled before you cover it. I think it was Patricia who said that she got a few drops of water in her ganache and it seized. After I read that, I always first cover the bowl with a paper towel (after it has cooled of course) to absorb any moisture that may form and then cover it with plastic wrap. I don’t mean to complicate things for you, just wanted to warn you of this. The ganache is awesome and you’ll love it. Good luck.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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no I appreciate all and any tips. The last thing I want is another night of “the worst night in baking EVER”!!!!!!!

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Posted: 18 March 2009 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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if you use a whisk, remember that you’re not trying to add air while the chocolate and cream are combining. it’s more of a stir until the two items are combined for a thick, rich chocolate appearance.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Rozanne - 18 March 2009 03:10 PM

skiweaver9, make sure you wait until your ganache is completely cooled before you cover it. I think it was Patricia who said that she got a few drops of water in her ganache and it seized. After I read that, I always first cover the bowl with a paper towel (after it has cooled of course) to absorb any moisture that may form and then cover it with plastic wrap. I don’t mean to complicate things for you, just wanted to warn you of this. The ganache is awesome and you’ll love it. Good luck.

Yep, it was me.  It was a batch of ganache that I put in the fridge to chill a little (was a hot and humid day) - the condensation didn’t form on it until after I removed it from the fridge.  Then, when I tried to whip it, disaster.  Thankfully I had a second batch in the fridge - I sopped up all traces of moisture from its surface with a paper towel before whipping that batch and it turned out fine.  The family ate the seized batch on ice cream.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I always use a whisk. A few tricks I have found helpful.  Let the cream sit on the chocolate for a minute or 2 before you begin stirring.  You will have to stir less this way, and the ganache will be smoother. Also, if you want the ganache to cool off quickly, a metal bowl cools much faster than glass or pottery.  I only use metal, though, if I need to use the ganache that same day.  I have heard that longer storage in metal could affect the flavor (but I’ve never wanted to try and see if that’s true!).

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Posted: 18 March 2009 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Wow these are helpful tips. so I don’t need it to cool quick I;m going to leave it out overnight.

AnneH, Did you leave yours in a metal bowl overnight??

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Posted: 18 March 2009 01:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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It will set up faster in a shallow container too - if I need it quick, I pour it onto a sheet tray and give it a little stir every now and then, as the edges start to “set” before the middle does.  Otherwise I leave it in a bowl, cover it with a kitchen towel, and leave it on the counter overnight (stainless steel bowl - no flavor problems at all).

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Posted: 18 March 2009 04:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I transferred mine to a different container and put the lid on immediately - before I read the admonition against it earlier in this string! Thankfully, I did not have a condensation issue. That could be because it’s still cool and dry inside. I won’t risk it again because it sounds like a good idea to let it cool with a cloth over it first.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 06:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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if it seizes you can fix by remelting, cooling and rebeating.

same thing with buttercream. warm it gently, a bit at a time until the lumps start to smooth out while beating.

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Posted: 18 March 2009 09:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Hello Ski,

  I agree with the others here. I have a made a ganache several times and I really like it. I know a lot of folks here like mixing the heated cream and chocolate with a whisk and that’s just fine, but I use my rubber spatula to slowly blend the two components until the two are thoroughly and evenly mixed with each other. I think it’s really a matter of personal preference and what you are comfortable with but either way the ganache will turn out okay for you. I also like to wait for the ganache to cool to room temperature before covering it. Since you are planning on using it the next day you should be able to leave it out over night as long as it’s covered. I’ve done this in the past and had no trouble with the ganache. I wait until it has reached room temp and then cover it in the bowl with the clear plastic wrap. I like to push the plastic wrap down directly on the ganache so that there are no air pockets between the ganache and the plastic. I start by gently pressing the plastic wrap down in the center and then work my way out to the edge of the bowl. This is fairly easy since the ganache is still somewhat soft and malleable at room temperature. If you want to, you can also put a plastic lid on the bow in addition to the plastic wrap if the bowl has a lid that goes with it. The bowl I use does not have a matching lid and the plastic wrap trick works just fine for me. If you still feel uncomfortable leaving the ganache out overnight you can chill it in the refrigerator and then throw it back in your double boiler for a few minutes over warm water (not boiling) to soften it back to the consistency you want. You might consider melting it part of the way, remove it from the heat and continue to stir until the rest has melted from the residual heat. This way it will be a little thicker once you’re done stirring. Good luck with this, Ski. We’re all pulling for you here.

~Matthew smile

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Posted: 19 March 2009 10:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Rozanne - 18 March 2009 03:10 PM

After I read that, I always first cover the bowl with a paper towel (after it has cooled of course) to absorb any moisture that may form and then cover it with plastic wrap.

GREAT TIP!!! Wish I’d seen that last week smile

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Posted: 20 March 2009 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I wonder if some of this discussion is actually about something other than seizing of chocolate. 

Seizing only happens when a small amount of water gets into melted chocolate, causing the whole mass to transform into a grainy clump (been there).  No matter how much you try to re-melt seized chocolate, it will not liquefy until you add enough water/liquid to keep the all the particles in suspension.  The bare minimum amount to prevent or correct seizing is about 1 tablespoon liquid for every 2 ounces of chocolate. 

When the cream is combined with the chocolate in ganache, there is plenty of liquid, more than enough to prevent seizing.  So when ganache develops lumps, it is probably NOT due to seizing (unless you have added the cream just a little at a time, rather than all at once).  One way to check this is to warm a bit of the grainy ganache- if the lumps disappear/remelt, then they were probably due to unstable/large cocoa butter crystal formation rather than seizing. 

I think the creation of large cocoa butter crystals is probably related to imperfect tempering, but I’m still trying to figure this one out- any chocolate experts out there want to comment on this?

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