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another ganache question
Posted: 20 March 2009 02:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I agree - seized chocolate is not remedied by reheating.  My batch of ganache was already made, cream fully incorporated and cooled without incident.  The seizing didn’t occur until the chilled ganache was removed from the fridge, condensation then formed, and unfortunately I didn’t remove that condensation before whipping the ganache, which immediately resulting in a huge batch of grainy mess.  Reheating the seized ganache did absolutely nothing to eliminate the grainy lumps.  Actually, it tasted fine, but the texture left much to be desired.

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Posted: 20 March 2009 04:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I have had both ganache and milk chocolate buttercream form what I think were large cocoa butter crystals in the fridge.  The surface was still shiny and smooth, but the interior was grainy.  When eaten (with a spoon, in the name of cooking science, of course!), the lumps melted in my mouth.  I gently re-melted the milk chocolate buttercream and it did just fine the second time around, came out of the fridge smooth and creamy.

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Posted: 21 March 2009 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Crystallizing is different that seizing.  Cocoa butter crystallization happens when melted chocolate cools and firms.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 12:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Sorry, nothing to say on seizing vs. crystallizing. As far as metal bowls, I should think you’d be fine with stainless steel. As a general rule I avoid storing things in copper or aluminum, which are more reactive. Anyway I only have one copper bowl and it is absolutely reserved for beating egg whites!

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Posted: 02 April 2009 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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How do you know how much ganache to make to say,cover 24 cupcakes???  I have no idea how much I made last time (I am very forgetful obviously) and i dont know if i should make a whole recipe, or halve it.

Also, Hector, you mentioned that you always use “whipped ganache”. Is that something different than the regular ganache?? I mean, after it firmed up, i took a mixer to it, and…whipped it…is that what you are talking about? Or is there a lighter ganache out there..

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Posted: 02 April 2009 12:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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It’s difficult to say how much ganache you’ll need for 24 cupcakes b/c that depends on how you plan to apply it. Will you be piping swirls or just applying a thin layer on them? In any case why don’t you make a full batch. It stores well. If you have leftovers you can freeze it for the next time.

Re the whipped ganache, yes you can whip the dark ganache for a lighter airier version. But I think Hector is referring to the Light Whipped Ganache on pg 268. It’s a really good one. Try it.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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ohhh i must have missed it in the book then. So i assume it tastes just like ganache but fluffier?  easier to pipe??
and yeah, true I was going to pipe with 1M so I guess I will make a whole batch!

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Posted: 02 April 2009 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Yes it tastes just like ganache but a lighter version. It has more cream and less chocolate than the regular dark ganache. The colour is lighter too. It pipes well. I prefer to use it as a filling as opposed to a frosting. I usually fill the cake with it and frost it with the dark ganache.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 01:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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what about on cupcakes?? I noticed that when the regular ganache firmed up after being piped, it was quite heavy.  It tasted really good though, just very heavy.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Absolutely, you can use it on the cupcakes and it will not firm up and be heavy like the dark ganache. It’s somewhat like a dense mousse.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 02:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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mm sounds good i think ill try it haha

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Posted: 02 April 2009 07:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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for this ganache it says 1 day room temp, ...if i leave this out overnight to harden up to frosting consistency, does this mean it will be bad the next day???

wait nevermind, it says to put it in the fridge for 2 hours…

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Posted: 02 April 2009 07:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Ski, don’t leave it too long in the fridge. It will be too stiff. I start checking after about an hour.

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Posted: 02 April 2009 09:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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ok so what am i looking for after an hour? a soft consistency and then I start whipping with my handheld mixer?

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Posted: 02 April 2009 09:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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It should be very cold. Like the temp. of whipping cream when you use it for whipped cream. It doesn’t really set. The consistency is like really thick cream. Hope that helps. Make sure you whip it only till the soft peak stage. It does continue to thicken quite a bit after that.

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