3 of 3
3
another ganache question
Posted: 03 April 2009 11:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04

can you use chocolate chips??? I dont have a food processor so last time i took a choocoate bar and chopped it and it was hard and messy and i was thinking, can i just use chocolate chips instead??

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Ski, I think it’s best to use the choc bar. The chips don’t melt as well as the bars.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15
skiweaver9 - 03 April 2009 02:26 PM

can you use chocolate chips??? I dont have a food processor so last time i took a chocolate bar and chopped it and it was hard and messy and i was thinking, can i just use chocolate chips instead??

The short answer is yes, but there are a few things to consider.  Chocolate chips contain stabilizers that help them to retain their shape when they’re heated - that means it won’t be completely smooth when melted - it will taste and melt on the tongue fine, but if you want to use your ganache for a glossy smooth glaze, you will need to strain it while it’s still pourable.  However, if you’re going to whip it or let it set-up to a spreadable or pipeable consistency, you won’t have to strain it.

For this cake I made the ganache with chocolate chips.

Image Attachments
New Camera 017 (Medium).jpg
 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18
Patrincia - 03 April 2009 02:58 PM

Chocolate chips contain stabilizers that help them to retain their shape when they’re heated - that means it won’t be completely smooth when melted


Thanks for the info Patricia. I knew the chips didn’t melt as well as the bars but I didn’t know why.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04

so you are saying you strained yours for that cake then?  I’m doing the whipped ganache, so i gather from your thoughts this is fine to use choc chips.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15
skiweaver9 - 03 April 2009 03:14 PM

so you are saying you strained yours for that cake then?  I’m doing the whipped ganache, so i gather from your thoughts this is fine to use choc chips.

Yes, I would say for the most professional results, strain ganache made with chocolate chips if you don’t have a food processor… oh, if you have a hand-held submersion blender, that works equally well to smooth the ganache.

Stay away from off brands or chocolate “flavored” chips… use brands like Nestle’s or Hershey’s or Ghiradelli…..

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15
Rozanne - 03 April 2009 03:03 PM
Patrincia - 03 April 2009 02:58 PM

Chocolate chips contain stabilizers that help them to retain their shape when they’re heated - that means it won’t be completely smooth when melted


Thanks for the info Patricia. I knew the chips didn’t melt as well as the bars but I didn’t know why.

You’re welcome (I shouldn’t know so much about chocolate chips, should I - guilty conscience smile)

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04
Patrincia - 03 April 2009 03:21 PM
skiweaver9 - 03 April 2009 03:14 PM

so you are saying you strained yours for that cake then?  I’m doing the whipped ganache, so i gather from your thoughts this is fine to use choc chips.

Yes, I would say for the most professional results, strain ganache made with chocolate chips if you don’t have a food processor… oh, if you have a hand-held submersion blender, that works equally well to smooth the ganache.

Stay away from off brands or chocolate “flavored” chips… use brands like Nestle’s or Hershey’s or Ghiradelli…..

hmm interesting.  I have one of them handheld chopper thingys that i use to chop up nuts and stuff, i thought it would have worked on chocolate but it didnt at all!  I know i should invest in a food processor, but i am too busy buying chocolate.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15

I wouldn’t think a hand held chopper would work well… they’re kind of flimsy and blades and straight.  The best knife for chopping a chunk of chocolate is actually a serrated knife… it makes a huge mess, but works wonderfully.

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Ski, if you have one of those handheld drum cheese graters (http://www.citychef.ca/xcart/customer/product.php?productid=17416), it will work well to grate chocolate as well.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 12:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04

true, ill try all of that. i didnt use a serrated knife, but i will next time

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 April 2009 02:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2568
Joined  2007-11-15
Rozanne - 03 April 2009 03:58 PM

Ski, if you have one of those handheld drum cheese graters (http://www.citychef.ca/xcart/customer/product.php?productid=17416), it will work well to grate chocolate as well.

Oh yes, excellent suggestion!

 Signature 

Come visit my blog at

http://butteryum.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 April 2009 12:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  266
Joined  2007-11-18

One of my favorite ganache frostings from TCB is the sour cream ganache. It’s super easy to make, lighter than regular ganache, and is useable right away (it’s sets up fast, so you need to use it immediately). If you don’t want to bother with whipping ganache, but still want a lighter ganache for icing or filling a cake, this is the way to go.

Oh, the sour cream ganache also keeps very well, too.

Roxanne

 Signature 

Visit my blog: The Mile High Baker at http://www.milehighbaker.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 March 2012 10:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2012-03-22
AnneH - 18 March 2009 01:06 PM

Ski,

I just made the ganache last night! It is sooo yummy. TCB says it is good at room temp for 3 days, so I covered mine and left it on the counter overnight. It’s nice and smooth and just the right consistency for icing the cake now - no bringing up to room temp needed. I’ll let someone else answer about the mixing method.

Have fun with it!


Hi,

I have a bit of a silly question, but what does TCB stand for? I’ve seen it mentioned a few times in this thread and don’t know what it stands for smile

I’m trying to find out whether I need to refrigerate my cakes once they have been covered in ganache and fondant or whether it can stay out of the fridge and still be fine to be eaten with no health risks?

Thanks!!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 March 2012 10:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1174
Joined  2009-11-24
MadeleineJohns - 23 March 2012 01:17 AM
AnneH - 18 March 2009 01:06 PM

Ski,

I just made the ganache last night! It is sooo yummy. TCB says it is good at room temp for 3 days, so I covered mine and left it on the counter overnight. It’s nice and smooth and just the right consistency for icing the cake now - no bringing up to room temp needed. I’ll let someone else answer about the mixing method.

Have fun with it!


Hi,

I have a bit of a silly question, but what does TCB stand for? I’ve seen it mentioned a few times in this thread and don’t know what it stands for smile

I’m trying to find out whether I need to refrigerate my cakes once they have been covered in ganache and fondant or whether it can stay out of the fridge and still be fine to be eaten with no health risks?

Thanks!!!!

 

TCB stands for The Cake Bible and RHC is Rose’s Heavenly Cakes.  TCB tells you how long a component can be left a room temp.  Ganache, I think, is 3 days.

 Signature 

So many recipes - so little time.

Profile
 
 
   
3 of 3
3
Back to top