Melting Pie Crusts- Help!
Posted: 24 March 2009 10:50 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello to everyone! I have been trying to understand this little problem for some time now, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! When I make pie crusts, I usually fit the crust into the pan I am using, freeze the crust for at least 2 hours, and then I blind-bake at the suggested temperature. 95% of the time the crust disintegrates in the oven and seems to melt. It has happened with recipes where the butter is cut into the flour or sugar, melted first and then blended into other ingredients, and also in recipes where it is creamed into the dry ingredients. I will leave here a sample crust and directions:

2 1/4 cups or 300 grams unbleached flour
3/4 cup or 150 grams sugar
pinch salt
1 stick or 115 grams butter, room temperature
1/4 cup or 50 grams lard, room temperature
1 egg
2 yolks

The butter and lard are cut into the dry ingredients, then the eggs are slowly and separately stirred into the mixture. It is then kneaded, rolled out to 1/4” and put in a springform pan. I refrigerated it for 2 hours even though the directions were 30 minutes. It was baked in a 350F oven for 15 minutes. When I first put the dough into the pan, it was perfect in consistancy, no holes, patching etc. When it came out, it was sliding down the springform walls and I was able to patch it but it was an unhappy sight at first. What can I do?

Thanks to everyone!

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Posted: 24 March 2009 11:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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What an unusual recipe.  Most pie crust recipes stress using very cold ingredients.   

I won’t be able to help you with this recipe but I can point you to one of Rose’s recipes that is very good and won’t disintegrate on you.
  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/10/roses_favorite_flaky_tender_pi.html

When I make pie crust,  I freeze everything… including my flour and the blade to my food processor if I’m going to be using it.

Good luck.
Tammy

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Posted: 25 March 2009 12:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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it is a funny recipe for the pie crust! Thank you for your tip and Rose’s recipe…I’ve cooked with her before and I must say that her recipes stand the test of time and if they don’t she has already information to tell you why not!

I’ll retry the recipe with your advice though! Thanks!

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Posted: 25 March 2009 06:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The recipe seems unusual to me in the amount of egg in it.  I nave never used a recipe for pastry with more than ! egg or a yolk and a small amount of water.  Perhaps that is the problem?

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Posted: 25 March 2009 09:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hi Housecat - your recipe sounds European.  Are you using a non-stick pan?

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Posted: 25 March 2009 11:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hello Housecat! I posted a response earlier geared towards American style crusts.  Thanks to FreshKid’s comments, below, I checked your recipe again and realized I had overlooked your sugar amount.  That looks like a recipe for Pate Sucre.  There is a well-balanced version in Rose’s Pie & Pastry Bible, or follow Fresh Kid’s recommendation.

Also,
-Freeze the crust thoroughly before you bake, and go directly from the freezer to oven.
-Be sure pie weights come up the sides of the pan all the way to the top of the crust.

Good Luck!

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Posted: 25 March 2009 11:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Welcome housecat! I agree with the others, give Rose’s recipe a try. If you do decide to make it, here is a link to her Youtube video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84e71BdlfoQ&feature=channel_page  There is a recipe that appears at the end of the video as well but that one is different from the one I posted below. The one below is the new one.
It may help you with the technique if you watch the video. As Julie said the recipe is posted on the blog. Here is the link to it. http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/10/roses_favorite_flaky_tender_pi.html
Good luck!!!

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Posted: 25 March 2009 01:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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HOUSECAT:
  Good afternoon. Welcome to our culinary forum. Housecat you received many good postings from our very knowledgeable members.
My opinion is to consider their suggestion & do Miss Rose’s pie recipes & secret tips, as member Roxanne suggested.
As member Patrincia says this recipe you are using is “European”...That is the type I use… however, I modified mine slightly employing Miss Roses way of mixing in the fat. Member Julie mentioned her concern about TOO much WATER!!!. & member Jeannette said too much Egg. They are both correct. gulp
  House cat they are correct. This recipe in comm. bakeries is known as SHORTDOUGH (sugar dough) pie crust. Yes it is a European style choice. If you want a viable pie crust you must reduce the egg yolk by 1 all you need is 1 whole egg plus 1, yolk. YOU MUST REDUCE the SUGAR by 1/2 the amount from 5 1/4 oz to 2,5/8 oz.  If you like you can increase the fat by 1, oz you can add shortening if you like it is a good choice. This pie recipe is now in balance.
If you decide to do it again come back & let us know how well you have done.
Good luck to you in your baking & enjoy the rest of the day my friend.

  ~FRESHKID.  smile

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Posted: 04 April 2009 03:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I don’t think there is anything wrong with the recipe you are using (it’s not exactly pie dough, but a sweet tart dough, but in Europe pie dough formulas are not often used), but you don’t say that you are par-baking the crust with pie weights. I think what you describe as melting is actually shrinkage and the crust is sliding down the edges of the pan because there is nothing to hold it down against the baking pan. Line your chilled crust (I actually freeze mine, it lessons the shrinkage even further) with parchment paper and fill it to the top with dried beans (pie weights). Bake the crust until the edges are a golden brown, remove the pie weights and continue baking until your desired color is achieved (either par-baked or fully baked).

Roxanne

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Posted: 04 April 2009 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Housecat,

One more thing: make sure you are giving the dough a 30 minute rest in the refrigerator before rolling it out. This ensures that the dry ingredients have absorbed all the liquid, and the resting time relaxes the gluten so rolling and shaping is easier. Chilling also helps prevent the fat from melting out of the dough while rolling/shaping.

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Posted: 04 April 2009 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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With sweet tart crusts, I find it works best to freeze them after putting them into the pan & before baking.

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