Waterbath Question
Posted: 30 March 2009 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]
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In reading that certain cakes need the waterbath my mom was asking me a question about that. I know if you use a springform pan, you have to line it with aluminum foil to prevent leaking, but what we were wondering is, why can’t you just put a pan of water say, on the rack UNDERNEATH the rack the cake is on?? Does it matter that the cake wouldn’t be sitting right in the bath, but sitting above it? Or next to it?

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Posted: 30 March 2009 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The waterbath keeps the sides of the pan and the batter from heating too fast.  Do some research online… there are a lot of great cheesecake recipes that don’t require a waterbath.  I avoid it at all costs!

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Posted: 30 March 2009 01:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I wonder if it will be as effective if you placed the springform pan in another pan and then placed that pan in the waterbath to preven seepage.  question

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Posted: 30 March 2009 01:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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or what if they made a pan that was hollow that you could fill with water and then place that inside a waterbath hahahaha. far fetched i think.

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Posted: 30 March 2009 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Rozanne - 30 March 2009 04:10 PM

I wonder if it will be as effective if you placed the springform pan in another pan and then placed that pan in the waterbath to prevent seepage.  question

I believe Rose suggested doing this some time ago on the blog…  using a silicone pan instead of foil.

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Posted: 30 March 2009 01:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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PATRINCIA:
  Good afternoon to you my friend. What you posted about cheesecake recipes that do not employ a BAIN MARIE & bake successfull custard is so. Truthfully, I have never, never baked one that way nor would I. However Patrincia, A few very good bakers that I know have & have said their custaed cake does not sustain any surface cracks. They place a large bowl of hot boilng water in the bottom of the oven & place the cheesecake pan above. Anyway My friend, I thought you would like to know this strange information. I trust you enjoyed the weekend. Enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~CASPAR.

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Posted: 30 March 2009 02:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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for most flourless or custard based cakes, a water bath is the classic time tested maethod.  Most japanese or french creamy versions of cheesecake use this method.  And, I wouldn’t bake my PERFECT flan w/o one!

i’ve just baked the chocolate oblivion torte on a 9” springform with a 9.5” silicone pan in chocolate in lieu of 2 layers of heavy duty foil, and things went well.  this on a pan filled with an inch or so of hot water.  ideally, for a 9” springform, a 12” x 2” round fits best for the water bath.  since the oblivion requires heating the eggs I do so by whipping the cold eggs with my 6 qt KA fited with the water jacket attachment filled with simmering water; works like a charm and you can use the water jacket as your water batch in the oven, been stainless steel, it won’t stain nor pit!

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Posted: 30 March 2009 05:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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To return to the original question. You cannot just put the pan of water in the oven. The purpose of the water bath is two fold. It increases humidity in the oven and more importantly it helps the custard cook evenly. Remember high school physics. Once water reaches boiling its temperature does not increase. If you cook a custard without the water bath what happens is that the edges over cook. The custard curdles and small pockets of liquid appear in the finished custard. I accept this side effect sometimes when I am lazy and cooking just for myself.

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Posted: 30 March 2009 09:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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~FRESHKID - 30 March 2009 04:20 PM

PATRINCIA:
  Good afternoon to you my friend. What you posted about cheesecake recipes that do not employ a BAIN MARIE & bake successfull custard is so. Truthfully, I have never, never baked one that way nor would I. However Patrincia, A few very good bakers that I know have & have said their custaed cake does not sustain any surface cracks. They place a large bowl of hot boilng water in the bottom of the oven & place the cheesecake pan above. Anyway My friend, I thought you would like to know this strange information. I trust you enjoyed the weekend. Enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~CASPAR.

And the same to you my friend!
smile

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Posted: 31 March 2009 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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whenever you see a cheesecake that is high on the side and low in the middle, it’s a sure bet that the cake was not baked in a water bath. the problem with a cake baked this way is that the outside is dry and crumbly. with the cake baked in a water bath you have a creamy smooth cake from center to edge.

however, you do not need to bake in a springform. i have baked many many many (many) cheesecakes and I never use a springform. for one thing i like my cakes to be at least 3 inches high and the second is the leaking problem. if you line your regular cake pan with wax or parchment on the bottom your cake will come out with ease.

spray the pan with pam, line with waxed paper. bake. cool overnight. while cake is still cold rotate quickly over a hot burner for several seconds. then shake the pan back and forth until you hear a sucking sound that tells you the cake is loose from the bottom. with an offset spatula gently loosen the cake from the sides of the pan. flip onto a flat plate or round then flip back onto the final surface.

easy peasy. no kidding!

jen

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Posted: 31 March 2009 07:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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A sunken center can also be caused by overbeating the cheesecake batter.

Observe below.  Two different cheesecake recipes - no sink, no dry, no crumbly, no crack…. no waterbath.

Jen - thanks for the waxed paper tip.  I’m going to try it next time I make a cheesecake!

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