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Bringing Frozen SMBC to Room Temp
Posted: 01 April 2009 01:32 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello!  First time posters here, a wife and husband, cooking/baking team.

We made a batch of Silk Meringue Buttercream and we’re quite happy with how it turned out for a first try, but with nothing to do with it, into the freezer it went.  We are looking to serve this on a cake, Saturday around 8ish I’d guess.  The cake would be made already obviously, and we would need to have time to turn it into chocolate frosting, and then frost the cake before guests arrive at 6.  We understand the importance of getting a batch of this stuff to room temperature before working with it.  Obviously it needs to start in the fridge first, then from there to the kitchen.  So how long are we looking at from when it goes from the fridge to the counter top, and when we will be able to use it?  We are guessing awhile, but are fairly unsure of the time line.  Any help on this would be great! Thanks in advance!

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Posted: 01 April 2009 01:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Welcome WafflesForTwo! I usually leave my buttercream out on the countertop over night to thaw. I skip the “fridge” step completely. However, if you want to, leave it in the fridge overnight and then leave it on your countertop first thing in the morning to thaw further. How long that will take depends on the temp in your kitchen. As you are already aware, it is very important to get it to rm temp before you beat it. By the way congratulations on getting it right the first time.

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Posted: 01 April 2009 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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i just put in on the counter for several hours and then if it needs some help nuke it for 10 secs and stir. it takes a while to come to temp. and you really can’t do anything until it’s completely soft. depending on how warm your kitchen is 4 to 8 hours.

beware that you can have some seizing (chocolate lumps) when using previously frozen buttercream due to the moisture. it is possible to gently soften the buttercream until the lumps melt, but it’s a delicate procedure. in future better to add the chocolate before freezing or make a new batch

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Posted: 01 April 2009 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Great, and thanks for the responses!  We have found a wealth of knowledge from both the Bread Bible (our first introduction) and the Cake Bible, as well as these amazing forums! We will do, hopefully everything will turn out alright.  When we made it, we weren’t really sure what we were going to do with it, so thought it better to leave it at base and then if we wanted to monkey with it, do so.  But we’ll know a little better in the future.  I’m not really sure if we’ll have time to make up an entire new batch (especially of the SMBC, which seemed fairly time extensive) on Saturday as we have a lot of cooking and cleaning to get done before guests arrive.  Our house can be pretty cool, as we live in Upstate NY and are (semi-) recently married and (somewhat) new home owners, so the thermostat is kept in on the cooler side, and turned down most nights to pinch the pennies until they scream. Here’s keeping our fingers crossed!  Push come to shove we have a room next to the furnace that seals up tightly and heats very quickly and holds heat well, its were we rise all our breads!  That might help the thaw a bit!

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Posted: 01 April 2009 02:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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where in upstate ny?

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Posted: 01 April 2009 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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If the frosting doesn’t seem to be warming on time, you can speed up the warming by gouging out peices of frosting and sperding them out on a cookie sheet.

Cathy

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Posted: 01 April 2009 06:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I go straight to the counter overnight too.  That is the most convenient and hassle free method for me.

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Posted: 01 April 2009 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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all true, excellent tips.

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Posted: 01 April 2009 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I’ve been daydreaming about freezing frosting. I wonder if it would work to scoop the frosting with an ice cream scoop and place on waxed paper on a cookie sheet. Then, flash-freeze it and put in a zippered bag. That would make thawing faster and you could pull out only as much as you needed. Has anyone tried something similar to this? Funny this question arose today because I was going to post it myself soon!

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Posted: 01 April 2009 09:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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i would think so!

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Posted: 01 April 2009 10:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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AnneH - 02 April 2009 12:29 AM

I’ve been daydreaming about freezing frosting. I wonder if it would work to scoop the frosting with an ice cream scoop and place on waxed paper on a cookie sheet. Then, flash-freeze it and put in a zippered bag. That would make thawing faster and you could pull out only as much as you needed. Has anyone tried something similar to this? Funny this question arose today because I was going to post it myself soon!

I’ve never done it that way, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work.  I usually freeze in vacuum sealed storage bags, then flatten the bag before the buttercream freezes.  The flat bags are easy to store, and the thaw faster than a big mound of buttercream.

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Posted: 01 April 2009 10:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Welcome!

Like Patrincia, I also freeze BC in a flat shape so it will thaw a little more quickly, and I leave it out overnight if the house is cold, otherwise in the fridge overnight and out on the counter first thing in the morning.  If it still itsn’t room temp in the middle an hour or so before I want to rebeat it, I break it into pieces for the last hour.  Silk meringue always needs rebeating- you can use a hand whisk if you want, and it will re-emulsify, thinning out and lumping a bit before becoming beautifully smooth again. 

If your buttercream has had plenty of time to come to room temp, any condensation should have time to evaporate, which should help prevent seizing.  Or you could try melting the chocolate with a little cream (or coffee or other complementary liquid), about 1T liquid per 2oz (if it’s 57%) chocolate and adding that to the BC.  BC will be a little softer, but it should still work and will prevent seizing.

And congratulations on making the silk meringue, it’s so tasty with the custard base!  Even though it’s a little more work, I enjoy making it more than mousseline because it always comes together nicely with no curdling to freak me out!

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Posted: 02 April 2009 01:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Well it appears the decision from the executive chef (that’s the wife), that we’ re basically going to make another batch, with the frozen stuff on standby if it messes up.  Basically we’ll just space the creme anglaise and the meringue apart, and then put the whole thing together a little bit later when we are all ready.  Hopefully everything will be fine!  We were amazed by it and both liked it a lot better than the regular buttercream.  We both loved the creme anglaise and basically could have just eaten that. Thanks for all the helpful responses, we’ll be set no matter what.

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Posted: 03 April 2009 09:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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A quick question here, though somewhat simple one.  TCB calls for the meringue to be beaten.  So we used just the standard paddle attachment on the Kitchen-aid and it worked seemingly just fine. However we’ve seen the whisk mentioned a few times.  Obviously we’re going to get a more volume out of the meringue with it, but will it incorporate the butter well enough? what about the syrup?  Just curious, thanks!

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Posted: 04 April 2009 08:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I only use the whip attachment from start to finish and it works perfectly.

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Posted: 04 April 2009 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I used to switch to the flat beater after half the butter was added (an instructor at one of the classes I took told us to do this) but now I use the whisk only.

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