2 of 2
2
French Macarons
Posted: 07 April 2009 04:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2599
Joined  2007-11-15

I can’t claim ADHD, but I definitely have a touch of OCD when it comes to baking… wish it would spill over into other areas of my life wink.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 April 2009 09:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  289
Joined  2008-08-13
Patrincia - 07 April 2009 07:31 PM

I can’t claim ADHD, but I definitely have a touch of OCD when it comes to baking… wish it would spill over into other areas of my life wink.

Ditto! I seem to have very selective OCD smile

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2009 06:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  31
Joined  2009-03-13

Hi All - I didn’t really intend to start a psychology discussion LOL -I am a perfectionist so I become obsessive when it comes to any project. That doesnt mean that I it comes out right because of it but generally it does mean that I will keep on going until I get it right. So I did make a batch of Pistachio macarons yesterday - I added 1 teaspoon of pistachio extract to the batter and tried to compensate for the addition of liquid with an addition of 1 generous teaspoon of flour. The outcome - no “foot” - but incredibly delicious. So I am at it agin today.

Thanks Shimi, I did read that article and it was incredibly informative. I believe that I have the ingredients and the prep down and many. many blogs etc are really specific about what need to be done - especially about the egg white thing. But far more undiscussed is the beating and folding and that is where my problems lie. I believe that in some cases I have been so anxious about overbeating the eggs to a dry consistency that I actually underbeat them and the mixture was runny so no “foot”. Then another time I beat the egg whites to perfection and folded in the dry ingredients but all it takes is one or two extra folds and they are overfolded, too fluid, and then - no “foot”. So I finally think that I have gotten to know the “right” consistency and I thnk that success or failure in this little cookie is far more in the flip of your very own wrist with your very own whisk rather than how long the whites are left out (also important though) or how fine the flour is (also important though).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2009 10:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  289
Joined  2008-08-13
AndyNYCK - 09 April 2009 09:20 PM

But far more undiscussed is the beating and folding and that is where my problems lie. I believe that in some cases I have been so anxious about overbeating the eggs to a dry consistency that I actually underbeat them and the mixture was runny so no “foot”. Then another time I beat the egg whites to perfection and folded in the dry ingredients but all it takes is one or two extra folds and they are overfolded, too fluid, and then - no “foot”. So I finally think that I have gotten to know the “right” consistency and I thnk that success or failure in this little cookie is far more in the flip of your very own wrist with your very own whisk rather than how long the whites are left out (also important though) or how fine the flour is (also important though).

I think this is precisely the reason these babies are difficult to master! Most of the blog articles I’ve read say to fold until the batter “flows like magma” but what on earth does that mean? I’ve never been near an active volcano in my entire life (and have no wish to be)! So I finally took a course here just to find out what the batter should look like, consistency wise.

The French teacher used the Italian meringue method. Sugar syrup heated to 118C, but she only started whipping the whites when the sugar was very close to temp. They were still at the ‘foamy’ stage when she poured the syrup in. Meringue was whipped until temp was between 38C to 42C, then folded into dry ingredients. Her check for the right consistency was when the batter fell from the spatula in a thick continous ribbon.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2009 11:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  31
Joined  2009-03-13

Yes, I have read the description “flow like magma” but my mind takes it s step further by wondering, hot magma (fluid with “flow”), or cooled magma (thicker movement with some limited “flow”) ? LOL
I was also confused by the word “flow” which means continuous movement to me and as I found out not exactly what worked.  At any rate, the chocolate ones that worked for me had substance. The batter moved, but it didn’t really activly “flow” in any way. When piped they stayed put and sat up with very limited spread because they really held their ground. The ones that didn’t work had more movement and a definate flow. When piped they held some shape, but they definately spread. After rereading the Syrup & Tang article it mentioned the problems that overbeating can cause. Spread and a transluscence to the piped macarons are signs of overbeating and that is what I had. Most people talk about having to make several batches that don’t work before they get them to work and I definately fall into that group. But it is teaching me exactly what to look for and I know that once I get it down - well just LOOK OUT!!!!

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 2
2
Back to top
 
‹‹ FREEZING Ganache      Peanut butter frosting ››