2- 12 inch baking pans in oven…at the same time???
Posted: 08 April 2009 10:02 AM   [ Ignore ]
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ok all you Wedding Cake bakers…..a dumb question. When I am preparing say the 2- 12 inch layers for the wedding cake, what do I do since they both won’t fit on my middle shelf. I’m afraid to bake one pan lower down for fear of over baking the bottom. Too high a placement in oven doesn’t seem good either. Should I bake each tier separately? If so do I keep the second filled pan in the fridge or out? I know this is really basic for you guys, but I’m used to baking 2-9 inch layers together at the same time. Not used to the Wedding Tier shuffle. Patricia , Hector and Roxanne….I’m sure you have a lot of experience in this. I have a standard Kitchenaid oven.

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Posted: 08 April 2009 01:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I am nothing close to the pro that many are on this forum, but I do bake wedding cakes. To bake 2 12-inch layers, I have used the two middle racks before (I have a fairly small oven) and switched the layers (top<—>bottom) in the middle of the baking time as well as rotating the pans 180 degrees. That seems to work fine depending on how tall/high the cake is expected to rise—I have had the bottom layer hit the oven rack above and ruin the top of the bottom layer (fixable, but a mess). Your racks may be further apart than mine. If so, this wouldn’t be an issue with rose’s erecipes since most if not all are designed for 2” layers (and not 3”....that’s usually where I have a problem.

I usually prefer to bake only on a single rack in the center with at least 2 inches between the pans and each other, as well as between the pans and the sides of the oven. That works up to 9” in my oven. Any larger and I try to bake one pan per oven unless I am very pressed for time.

While the first large layer is baking, I usually leave the second layer of the tier on the counter (and not in the fridge) and haven’t had problems, but I would be very interested in what the others have to say about this!

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Posted: 08 April 2009 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Rachel, Thanks for your input. I feel like a dummy asking. I, too usually bake to layers at a time. I believe I can fit 2-10 inch layers , I can with not quite enough room bake 2-9 inch and 2-6inch, although I think ther would not be enough circulation space. I really don’t want to rotate ...just afraid something would happen and this is my daughter’s wedding cake! What am I nuts??!!! Anyway, I am also looking forward to hearing from Patrincia , Roxanne and Hector.

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Posted: 08 April 2009 03:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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since you can freeze cake layers very well in advance (and they are much easier to handle for frosting and assembly when frozen), you can definitely experiment with baking them. Try baking the two at once and then if they don’t come out properly, start from scratch!

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Posted: 08 April 2009 05:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I’m a one rack at a time kind of baker… I just think everything turns out better when baked right in the center of the oven, and I hate having to fiddle with turning, flipping, or switching positions.  I can get 2 9” pans on the same rack with enough space around each to result in even results, but for cakes larger than 9”, I just bake them one at a time.  I use a standard KitchenAid oven (electric), and I don’t bake with the convection feature turned on.

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Posted: 08 April 2009 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Patrincia- glad to know we are on the same page. What do you do with the other cake pan full of batter when you are baking the first layer of the tier? Leave on the counter or in the fridge?

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Posted: 08 April 2009 06:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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On the blog Rose’s mentioned that you get the best rise if you pour the excess batter directly into your a baking pan and store it that way in the fridge, as opposed to storing the batter in the fridge and then pouring it into the pan.  However, for larger tiers, I only keep one of each size pan on hand (and my fridge space is usually limited), so I tend to keep the excess batter in the bowl on the counter.  I wash the first pan just as soon as I can turn out the baked cake after it’s 10 minute rest, then bake cake number 2.

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Posted: 08 April 2009 06:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Patricia, that’s very interesting. Does the second cake bake as well as the first considering it has been sitting out for so long? I know Rose suggests pouring the batter into the pan and then refrigerating it and that is what I do with the extra batter I use for cupcakes.

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Posted: 08 April 2009 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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They usually turn out just fine.  If one happens to end up a tad taller than the other, I just trim them both to be the same height and all is well in the world. smile

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Posted: 09 April 2009 01:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hi - actually I have been thinking about this very thing - dealing with the extra pan/s. I, too, have read Rose’s advice about pouring remaining batter into the pans and then refrigerating while the first ones bake. However, I also noted Rose says that finished batter should be at 70-75?  So, would it be best to bring up to warmer temp after removing from fridge, or just place into already heated oven from which the others came? Thanks

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Posted: 09 April 2009 08:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I don’t know…call me crazy…but for the short amount of time , say 35-40 minutes, that it takes to bake the first layer, I think it would cause the batter to be more unstable by putting it into the fridge for such a brief time and then taking it out and putting it into the oven. I would think it’s more stable at a constant temperature. I do believeevery baker should make there lives easier and buy 2 of each pan size they use.

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Posted: 09 April 2009 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I imagine it would be more important to refrigerate unused batter if you were say mixing a lot of batter at one time, like in a 15-20qt Hobart or something.  For just one cake pan, I usually just leave the batter at room temperature.

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