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When can I dig into a cheesecake?
Posted: 13 April 2009 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone! I am gearing up to make the Cordon Rose Cheesecake recipe for the first time for my husband. I have attempted various cheesecakes before, and no matter how easy the recipe has been, no matter how “foolproof” they claim to be, all have been epic failures; from the cheesecake that came out with the texture closer to a butter cake, to the one where the crust was amazing, but the cheesecake itself was simply putrid, cheesecake and I just don’t seem to see eye to eye.  Needless to say, a lot is riding on this one. I have studied the recipe carefully, and have taken notes on the Youtube video of Rose making this herself, so I feel fairly confident that I may be able to pull this off…or if not, that free will doesn’t exist, and I was never destined to make a successful cheesecake. However, I feel that Rose’s recipe could be “The One”.  One question remains, and it’s probably a silly question, but I am leaving nothing to chance.

Rose’s recipe calls for letting the cake sit in the fridge overnight before un-molding. I was hoping to make the cheesecake and serve it that same day, after dinner. How many hours should it comfortably chill before I serve it? I want to err on the side of caution, and don’t want to chance cutting into it too soon. Any thoughts or tips would be greatly appreciated!

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Posted: 13 April 2009 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I have made this cheesecake several times, and I always let it chill for at least 6 to 8 hours. The reason is that even after it has cooled for an hour in the turned-off oven and for an hour on the counter top, the middle sometimes still looks a bit “jiggly.” This is normal. The cheesecake firms up as it sits in the fridge, so that the texture after 6 or 8 or even 24 hours is perfect.  If you could make it the day before you plan to serve it, that would be the best way to go, in my opinion. That is what I always do.

When you store it in the fridge, with a piece of plastic wrap on the top, be sure to spray the plastic wrap with cooking spray so it does not stick to the top of the cheesecake.

Good luck, and let us know if this turns out to be the cheesecake you’ve been looking for smile It is sensational served with fresh berries.

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Posted: 13 April 2009 01:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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6 to 8 hours it is, and I’ll probably out of paranoia wait at least till 9 hours have passed, or find a way to make it the day before, as you suggested.  Thanks for the tip on the “jiggly” center-I probably would have taken one look at the wiggle and thought the cake wasn’t done all the way! I’ll let you know how it turns out! Thanks again!

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Posted: 13 April 2009 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I just made this cheesecake over the weekend.  It’s been a long time since I’ve made it and the whole family loved it!  I would agree on the 6-8 hours.  I’ve always made it the day before though, so I can’t say for sure.  One thing to be sure of is that you have a pan wide enough to accommodate the springform pan for the water bath.  9x13 pans are not wide enough.  A lasagna pan would probably work or you can just go get a disposable aluminum pan.

Another visual tip for you is that this cheesecake does not (or should not) brown at all.  In fact, it may not look like it has baked at all!  It’ll probably look very similar to the way it looked when you popped it in the oven.  Don’t let that fool you.

Hope this recipe works for you.  It should get rave reviews from everyone who trys it!

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Posted: 13 April 2009 07:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Cheesecake is a family favorite, so I know all about fending off the masses when I have one chilling in the fridge.  6 hours to overnight is ideal, but you can enjoy it in as little as 4 hours after putting it in the fridge.  Be sure to put it in the coldest part of your fridge, and you can speed the chilling process a long by elevating the cheesecake on a couple of soup cans.

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Posted: 13 April 2009 09:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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This is my only cheesecake recipe, it’s the best one I’ve ever made.  It’s truly best made the day before, even 2 days before. The longer it sits in the refrigerator, it firms up more nad the flavor develops.  The longer in the fridge, the better IMO. And as Pavlovcat said, it does not brown, but don’t let that fool you.  This cheesecake is outrageously delicious.

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Posted: 14 April 2009 12:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I have been meaning to try Rose’s cheesecake but never got around to it for one reason or another. After reading all the posts, it’s at the top of my ‘to try’ list.

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Posted: 14 April 2009 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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i vote for overnight. i let mine cool completely in the oven and then put in the fridge. anything less than 8 hours and you have a soft custard and not a cake.

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Posted: 14 April 2009 06:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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the reason rose’s cheesecake is so fabulous creamy and tender is because it is baked for only a few minutes, and then it continues to bake with the oven’s residual heat.  furthermore, the it needs to be cooled till it reaches 40 degrees or so (overnight is the safest, depends how cool your refrigerator gets); you can’t harm the cheesecake by refrigerating it longer than needed (up to 2 days or so), but you can harm the cheesecake if you cut it before it has reached minimum refrigeration.

this slow process gives you the best creamy and tender textures on custard type cakes, like cheesecakes, flans, and the chocolate oblivion truffle torte!

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Posted: 14 April 2009 07:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Ok, so I got all my ingredients to room temperature, prepped what I needed to prep, got all amped up to make some amazing cheesecake…..and realized that I have a 9 inch springform pan, not an 8 inch springform as called for in the recipe! NOOOOOOOOO! Can I still proceed with larger pan, or must I either invest in the 8 inch pan…..or must I just accept that the cheesecake gods are trying to tell me something-that, as I feared, this is not supposed to happen? OR are there modifications I could make to still use my 9 inch pan? I’m willing to try anything at this point, just to attempt this cake….

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Posted: 15 April 2009 06:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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hectorwong - 14 April 2009 09:42 PM

it needs to be cooled till it reaches 40 degrees or so

Hector is right.  The cheesecake needs to be 40F before you cut into it - regardless of how long it takes to reach that temp, it will be ready to serve.

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Posted: 15 April 2009 06:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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WafflesForTwo - 14 April 2009 10:50 PM

Ok, so I got all my ingredients to room temperature, prepped what I needed to prep, got all amped up to make some amazing cheesecake…..and realized that I have a 9 inch springform pan, not an 8 inch springform as called for in the recipe! NOOOOOOOOO! Can I still proceed with larger pan, or must I either invest in the 8 inch pan…..or must I just accept that the cheesecake gods are trying to tell me something-that, as I feared, this is not supposed to happen? OR are there modifications I could make to still use my 9 inch pan? I’m willing to try anything at this point, just to attempt this cake….


You can proceed, but the timing will be a bit off and your finished slices won’t be as tall.  Invest in a good set of pans… you’ll use them all!  PS - you can bake cheesecakes in standard cake pans too.  It’ll be harder to serve, but it will bake fine.

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Posted: 15 April 2009 09:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Speaking of cheesecakes, have any of you frosted a cheesecake as described in TCB? This seems like gilding the lily to me, but I’m curious to know how it tastes. Usually, I’m not a big fan of cheesecakes, but Rose wrote in the cheesecake description that her recipe has converted people. So, a part of me is curious to try it.

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Posted: 16 April 2009 09:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I frost my cheesecakes all the time with the white chocolate creamcheese frosting in the Cake Bible.  Divine!!!!  However I love it best with Rose’s cheesecake recipe. When I use it on others, like the ones that call for 2 lbs of creamcheese, it seems to taste too rich.  (I never thought I’d find any cake too rich but these ones I do)

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Posted: 18 April 2009 12:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Well, I gave it my best shot- I made the cheesecake, just like I said I would, followed the directions precisely, and my two words to describe the outcome are: Epic Failure!!! I don’t know where I went wrong. I made allowances for the larger pan size with the timing and all, I mixed the ingredients “just like on Youtube!”, had a pretty remarkably wonderful Apricot Puree (from the Cake Bible) that swirled beautifully into it, and I let it chill in the fridge for a good long time….but even so, my husband put a forkful into his mouth and I could see it in his eyes, the attempt to hide the “What in God’s name am I eating?” expression but to no avail. It was pretty wretched, and I can’t figure out where I went wrong. The taste was almost putrid, as if I had used sour cream or cream cheese that had gone bad, although my ingredients were fresh! The cake was done, fully formed, and it had reached the requisite 40 degree mark….sigh- I guess the cheesecake gods weren’t gonna let me win this time.

I really have to hand it to you all though-you gave me some great tips and advice, and I am truly appreciative of the help and support. And if I ever try to make one again, I’ll certainly let you know…..but I need to walk this one off first… or just throw in the towel. I’m laughing about it now- heck, it’s just one more car in the seemingly endless train of “Cheesecakes I Have Failed to Bake”, right? smile  I’m going to do some thinking and see if I can figure out my mistake….

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Posted: 18 April 2009 12:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Oh no… I’m so sorry to hear about this.  So the cheesecake set-up correctly, you just didn’t care for the flavor… is that right?

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