1 of 3
1
Best oven for baking cakes
Posted: 13 April 2009 03:22 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2009-04-13

I am remodeling my home kitchen this summer, and I will be purchasing new appliances. I love to bake, and I also have a very small cake business that I run out of my kitchen, so cakes are my main concern as I consider appliances. I am considering a double wall oven so baking can move along twice as fast. Does anyone have any tips regarding a specific oven, or any qualities they particularly like or dislike? I currently have a gas oven, but have read that an electric oven will tend to dry out a cake. Does anyone know if this is correct?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 April 2009 07:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15

Hi Kerie - Gas vs electric shouldn’t have any effect on how moist/dry your cakes end up being.  I know some wall ovens cavities aren’t as large as range ovens, so you should take that into consideration if you bake a lot of large tiers.  I purchased a convection oven, but find I don’t like using the convection feature for baking… works great for roasting though.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 April 2009 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4823
Joined  2008-04-16

Keriearrow, I wouldn’t want you to be in the same boat I am in, having purchased an oven that turned out to be a disappointment.  It is a GE monogram wall oven, and I have the worst time with it.  It has a huge hot spot on the right, even with the convection feature on, so that everything I bake gets pushed over on the other side.  Large items are subject to the hot spot and get burned in some places before others are finished ccoking.  Also, it doesn’t hold its temperature very well, it seems to have a very wide range of fluctuation while set at one temp (it looses 75F before the heating element kicks back on).

Good Luck with your hunt for the perfect cake oven!  Please report back on what you decide!

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or less) Sour - Part II

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 April 2009 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1421
Joined  2007-11-15

Julie, may i suggest you line quarry tiles on the most top oven shelf and on the most bottom oven shelf, and preheat 60 minutes.  then you bake right in the middle shelf.
The oven will be EVEN.  The tiles will be the source of heat.  Tiles take 60 minutes to preheat, and another 60 minutes to cool.  Tiles don?t drop in temperature when you open the oven door.  The oven will remain hot and constant, thus the oven heating elements will minimally cycle on/off which is when you get the burst of uneven heat.
Often, when I need to bake 3 half sheets of biscuit, I line ALL oven shelves with quarry tiles, and bake all 3 half sheets at once.  Works wonderfully.  This is the closest to a professional deck oven.

 Signature 

http://myyellowkitchen.com/index-equipment-html/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 April 2009 07:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  216
Joined  2007-12-17

Hector, are you saying you bake the biscuit directly on the tiles?  Does this change the cooking times?  I’m surprised the bottom doesn’t over cook or burn?  Interesting.

 Signature 

Come visit my blog
http://reviewofrecipes.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 April 2009 07:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  324
Joined  2008-03-19

I agree with Hector’s advice to get a tile for the oven. I have a pizza baking stone, about 1 inch thick, that I keep in my oven all the time. It keeps the oven temperature wonderfully consistent.

I remodeled my kitchen a year ago, and I put two 30-inch ranges next to each other. One range is a 10-year old Maytag “Super Capacity Plus.” I bought it because of two features: 1. Large oven capacity, and 2. Ability for oven temperature to go as low as 100 degrees F. I often use it as a warming oven to hold cooked food at 145 degrees for several hours. However, when it was my only oven (before I bought the second range), I baked with it, and it baked just fine with a pizza stone on the lowest shelf.

My second range is a Viking. I bought it because I wanted the highest BTU output on the cooktop burners, and I liked the fact that the heavy cast-iron grates cover the entire range top, so that I can slide heavy pots around without lifting them. I now use it as a primary baking oven, and it works fine. The oven capacity is a little smaller than my Maytag, but the advantage of the Viking is that you can flip the convention fan on and off at will, whereas the Maytag is a computerized console that you have to program and wait 5 minutes for the convection fan to kick in.

In my experience, you do not necessarily have to spend a lot of money for a good, reliable oven. You just have to look at all the technical information, decide what is most important to you (i.e., oven size, warranty, lack of computerized controls, etc.), and go with the one that fits your constraints.

If you decide to go with a Viking, do not get the self-clean model. I had a lot of problems with it. Eventually, the company had to replace it with a non-self-clean model that has been very reliable.

One last point. Even if you go with a good, reliable brand-name oven, there may be minor glitches in the way a particular oven functions. For example, the Viking repair guy told me that he serviced the ovens of a woman who is a professional caterer. She has an enormous kitchen with five identical Viking ovens in it. She swears that one of the ovens runs 25-degrees cooler than the other four. He has worked on that particular oven and cannot get it to work identically to the others. I am telling you this because, even though I don’t believe in “ghosts in the machine,” sometimes particular appliances seem to have their own “personality” that you have to take into account when you use them.

Good luck!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 April 2009 08:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1421
Joined  2007-11-15

yes, i bake the biscuit sheets directly on the tiles.  unless your tiles are directly on the oven floor or too near the bottom or the top of the oven, the tiles are at the ‘correct’ oven temperature.  this is the beauty of baking on a deck oven which is completely lined with tiles or ceramic material and you bake directly on it.

 Signature 

http://myyellowkitchen.com/index-equipment-html/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  161
Joined  2007-11-21

Hi everyone—Hector, could you describe what you call quarry tiles? I didn’t know what you meant in the past so have been keeping a pizza stone in the oven. But   now perhaps I can find out what they are, and using them may help the quality of my cakes! You are an inspiration - thanks!

 Signature 

http://bakingsorceressapprentice.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 02:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1421
Joined  2007-11-15

unglazed quarry tiles, explained on bread bible.  you can find them at the hardware stores.  pizza stones work, but rather expensive and crack often.  quarry tiles, 4, 6 o 8” square are easier to line on the oven shelves.

 Signature 

http://myyellowkitchen.com/index-equipment-html/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  637
Joined  2008-01-24

This is such a tough question. Most of us only have experience with one or two brands/models of ovens and we learn to compensate for the short comings of the tools we have at hand. When we were remodeling our kitchen 6 years ago I bought a dual fuel Viking range. Every time I turned the oven on it emitted a foul odor. I ran the self clean cycle over and over to no effect. Finally I called in the warranty serviceman and he declared the smell gave him a headache and he couldn’t figure out where the problem was. They gave us a full refund so I splurged and bought a Gaggenau. I love the Gag but it is a little small for production baking.
I wonder if we could convince Cooks Illustrated to do an oven evaluation?

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 06:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15

I have a KitchenAid Pro Dual-fuel (gas on top, electric in the oven).  I love it.  I picked it over the more “commercial looking” brands for 2 reasons, 1) it was considerably cheaper, and 2) the oven has a self-clean cycle.  I love it so much that it moved across the country with me a few years ago.

Image Attachments
P1000996 (Medium).jpg
 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04

Can i just say I wish i had your kitchen Patrincia!!  ANd whats inside the oven too

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 08:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18

Love the colour combintation in your kitchen and everything is so spotless.

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 08:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2595
Joined  2007-11-15
Rozanne - 15 April 2009 11:11 PM

Love the colour combintation in your kitchen and everything is so spotless.

HA!!!  Believe me when I say that I really have to work at it.  I have 4 big kids who make really big messes… they spill milk splatters all over counters, floors, and cabinet doors, they drop crumbs EVERYWHERE, they never ever put food away, they leave all the cabinet and pantry doors wide open, and despite the thousands of times I’ve reminded them, they constantly “forget” to put their dishes in the sink.. AHHHHH!!!!!  It’s an endless battle, and far from perfect I assure you.  The only spot in the kitchen that stays reasonably clean and untouched is the stove (except the top where they park the pots and pans that come out of the dishwasher, because it’s easier to dump them there than actually put them away). 

Ah, the joys of parenthood smile.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 April 2009 11:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4823
Joined  2008-04-16

Hector, thanks for your advice on the quarry tiles!  I have tried putting a pizza stone in the bottom of the oven, but it makes no difference to what is baked on a higher rack.  However, your suggestion to line all the racks and bake directly on the stones sounds like something I should try.  I might have to stand them up vertically on the side of the oven that has such a bad hot spot, perhaps that might keep things from getting burned on the right hand side all the time.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or less) Sour - Part II

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 April 2009 12:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1429
Joined  2007-11-18
Patrincia - 15 April 2009 11:46 PM
Rozanne - 15 April 2009 11:11 PM

Love the colour combintation in your kitchen and everything is so spotless.

HA!!!  Believe me when I say that I really have to work at it.  I have 4 big kids who make really big messes… they spill milk splatters all over counters, floors, and cabinet doors, they drop crumbs EVERYWHERE, they never ever put food away, they leave all the cabinet and pantry doors wide open, and despite the thousands of times I’ve reminded them, they constantly “forget” to put their dishes in the sink.. AHHHHH!!!!!  It’s an endless battle, and far from perfect I assure you.  The only spot in the kitchen that stays reasonably clean and untouched is the stove (except the top where they park the pots and pans that come out of the dishwasher, because it’s easier to dump them there than actually put them away). 

Ah, the joys of parenthood smile.

Oh, I don’t doubt for one second how hard you have to work to keep it clean and neat. I only have two kids and I clean like a maniac all day.  LOL

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 3
1
Back to top