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Category ... Cookie

Shortbread for Mother's Day

Apr 29, 2017 | From the kitchen of Rose in Recipes

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Many years ago, I fell in love with shortbread cookies and decided to sell them. My stepdaughter Beth, who has great artistic talent, and is now an architect, made this sign which I put up in the basement of our apartment house. I only ever got one order. I brought a sample to Georgia DeLucca of Dean & Delucca and his verdict was: "Did you ever try Danish Lurpack butter? It needs salt." I strongly disagreed. Loving salt though I do, this one cookie, which has only butter, sugar, and flour, is the soul of purity and needs nothing more. (I did manage to suspend disbelief and tried the Lurpack butter, but even one grain of salt stood out in an unpleasant way.

Thus ended my career as a cookie baking saleswoman and I went on to write The Cake Bible, and then Rose's Christmas Cookies, in which this recipe resides.

I tried many different types of flours and sugars including part rice flour, which adds crispness, but bleached all-purpose flour is my favorite for this cookie.

Scottish Shortbread Cookies

Makes: 4 dozen 1-1/2 inch cookies

Equipment: cookie sheets, no preparation needed

unsalted butter: 284 grams/10 ounces
powdered sugar: 28 grams/1/4 cup lightly spooned into cup and leveled off
granulated sugar: 50 grams: 1/4 cup
bleached all-purpose flour: 362 grams/3 cups, lightly spooned into cup and leveled off

Cut the butter into 1/2 to 1 inch cubes. Wrap it, and refrigerate.

In a food processor, process the sugars for about 1 minute until the sugar is very fine. Add the butter and pulse until the sugar disappears. Add the flour and pulse until there are a lot of moist, crumbly little pieces and no dry flour particles remain.

Empty the mixture into a plastic bag and press it together. Remove the dough and knead it lightly until it holds together.

Set 2 oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Preheat the oven to 275°F/135°C.

Measure 2 level teaspoons or 1 scant tablespoon of the dough and knead each piece by flattening it between your palms and then rolling it into a 1 inch ball.

Place each ball on the cookie sheets, flattening it with a cookie press, fork, or the bottom a tumbler, lightly moistened with water. Work with one ball at a time, right after rolling it, so that it does not crack around the edges. Leave about 1 inch between the flattened cookies.

Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until pale golden (do not brown). For even baking, rotate the cookie sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through the baking period.
Use a small angled metal spatula or pancake turner to transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool completely.

For the Love of Eiswein--A Christmas Story

Dec 24, 2016 | From the kitchen of Rose in Special for the LA Times Syndicate

first published December 1997, for the Los Angeles Times SyndicateHeadShot.jpg

There are those who truly believe in the cliche that love is blind and indeed they are often right. Life isn't perfect, so we tend to fill in the gaps with our creative imagination, and a certain degree of purposeful lack of vision can go far in keeping things going. But given those rare times when one is hit with the real thing that never disappoints, is lasting, in fact mellows and improves with age, and for which one can actually remove the rose colored glasses so often necessary for enchantment, only a fool would fail to treasure such beneficence. There were few such fools Christmas Eve 1996 when the Gods bestowed the gift of the most perfect conditions to date for making Eiswein to many vineyards throughout the wine growing regions of Germany.

Grapes, other than dessert wine grapes, are normally harvested in October. The advantage of allowing grapes to sit longer on the vine is that more flavor and sweetness can develop. The risk, however, is that they usually start to deteriorate before the temperature drops in mid January. The longer the wait, the higher the risk that it will all be for naught and the entire crop wasted.

When grapes freeze, the watery part freezes solid but the sugary juices containing flavors remain liquid. The grapes must be pressed before thawing so that only the naturally concentrated juices are released and the watery part stays frozen and left behind.
Because it is impossible to predict just how long the temperature will cooperate, it is advisable to pick the grapes immediately. When vintners emerged from mid-night mass on Christmas Eve, to discover that an unprecedented early drop in temperature had frozen the perfectly ripened grapes, they felt as if they had been given a Christmas present. It was the same heart-warming story in many vineyards throughout Germany: Fellow parishioners volunteered to go immediately to the vineyards to help pick the precious harvest before the grapes could defrost and spoil.

Eiswein, was invented in 1965 in Germany, the world's Northern-most wine growing region. It is usually made with either the Riesling, or Scheurebe grape (a cross between Riesling and Muller-Thurgau). It's intensity is at least equal to that of the renowned trockenbeerenauslese, fondly referred to as tba. Eiswein, however, has more purity of flavor because the freezing process does not impart any additional flavors.

The concentration of grapes for tba is caused by botrytis (aka noble rot). Botrytis, which is a fungus, breaks down the skin of the grape, causing the water to evaporate and the grape to shrivel. The botrytis also adds a distinctive burnt sugar-like tartness which masks some of the grape's flavor. The most conscientious growers remove any botrytis affected grapes before making the Eiswein.

The 1996 Eiswein harvest had the advantage not only of an early freeze but also of exceptionally clean botrytis free conditions and, of course, this is reflected in the extraordinary quality of the wine.

We all know that too much sweetness can quickly become cloying, but the beauty of a great German Eiswein is that the natural high acidity of the grape lends a provocative stinging poignancy, much desired balance between sweetness and fruit, and aging potential of as long as 100 years. Though often easy to drink even when very young, it isn't until about 10 years that the sweetness and acidity come into full married balance, with layers of unfolding flavors. It only takes a little glass of this liquid joy to go a long way and once experienced, it is impossible to forget.

Eiswein, retailing from $65 to $150 for 350 ml., is relatively inexpensive if you consider that for every glass you are drinking the equivalent of ten glasses that would have been produced from the same grapes had they not undergone the concentration. Besides, Christmas comes but once a year and Eiswein more seldom still. And once opened, the wine will keep refrigerated to be savored repeatedly over several weeks.

People are always asking what to eat with a wine that fills the mouth with such honeyed ambrosial nectar, it's like eating a glorious liquid dessert. My choice would be the simplest and finest cookie I know: the almond crescent. Crisp, buttery, impossibly fragile, with the faintest whisper of cinnamon, they will prove the point that one perfect thing deserves another. And, this recipe takes very little time to make in a food processor.

1996 Eisweins that I have enjoyed in the various wine regions of Germany which are exported to U.S.A. include: Selbach-Oster (Mosel), Hermann Donnhoff (Nahe), Gunderloch (Rheinhessen), Heyl zu Hernsheim (Rheinhessen), Josef Biffar (Pfalz), Fuhrmann-Eymael (Pfalz), Muller-Catoir (Pfalz),Von Buhl (Pfalz), Dr. Heger (Baden), Salwey (Baden).

Continue reading "For the Love of Eiswein--A Christmas Story" »

Shirl's Cranberry Scone Thins

Jan 07, 2016 | From the kitchen of Rose in Recipes

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Shirl Gard, pastry chef and consultant, recently sent me her version of my Cranberry Scone Toppers from The Baking Bible. This is one of my favorite recipes and she has done an excellent presentation including step by step photos. Check out the posting on her website.

What could be more gratifying than sharing recipes and inspiring other professionals to create one's of their own! Oh wait--I know--their having the graciousness and professionalism to credit the originator of the recipe as did Shirl.!

A Sublime New Cookie for the Holidays

Nov 03, 2014 | From the kitchen of Rose in Recipes

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It is a rare treat these days to meet with friends and to have dinner in New York City, so when my long time dearest friend and protégé David Shamah and I planned a special reunion and celebration, the restaurant we chose was Drew Nierporent's new Bâtard. We had a very early 5:45 reservation which we loved because we had a whole hour of quiet conversation before the restaurant filled to capacity and the noise level rose.

We were offered a glass of excellent champagne while we perused the menu and enjoyed the lovely decor and perfect subdued lighting (note the exquisite plaster bas-relief walls behind David in this photo).

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My appetizer was a silken and flavorful work of art:

YELLOWFIN TUNA
marinated radish, quinoa, bok choi

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David's appetizer was a richly luxurious terrine:

SHORT RIB & TAFELSPITZ TERRINE
smoked egg, german sesame, apple

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For the main course, we shared a fabulous Colorado lamb dish:

LAMB FOR TWO
roasted rack, confit shoulder, crispy lamb bacon, turnips, grilled lemon

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Instead of ordering two desserts, we decided to share the epiosse--my favorite cheese:

EPOISSES
mushroom vinaigrette, cipollini, grilled baguette

followed by:
CARAMELIZED MILK BREAD
blueberries, brown butter ice cream

The milk bread was a delicious combination of soft, moist, and airy interior coated with a gossamer-fine crust of wondrously brittle sugar.

And just as we thought we had fnished, chef Markus Glocker sent out the amazing Lubeck marzipan cookies. As a non-marzipan lover I was blown away by how perfect these were. The virtue of marzipan is how it keeps its moisture so that the insides of the cookies are moist, creamy, and chewy, the topping crunchy with sliced almonds and lightly browned marzipan. But what elevated them to exceptional perfection of balance was the unexpected highlight of salt. Here is the recipe for you to enjoy for your holiday baking. I encourage you to purchase the Lubeck marzipan which is imported by Swiss Chalet Fine Foods from Germany. (They also carry Darbo--the best apricot preserves.) It has the most silken texture and delicious flavor of any marzipan I've ever tasted. Note: Any leftover marzipan can be frozen for months. Also, I tested the recipe with unblanched almonds, as that is what I had on hand, and liked the added flavor and color contrast.

In Austria and Germany this type of cookie is called "marzipan horns" because they are usually shaped to suggest horns, but I've renamed them in honor of the marvelous chef and restaurant: Glocker Marzipan Bâtards.

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Continue reading "A Sublime New Cookie for the Holidays" »

Happy New Years Cookie Present

Jan 01, 2013 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookie

If you would like my recipe for Mexican Wedding Cakes, first published in Rose's Christmas Cookies, it is featured on page 26 of this stunning on line magazine. I just love how they styled and photographed it:


Hope this starts off your New Year's in a sweet and happy way.

Buttercrunch Toffee

Dec 21, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose in Web Appearances

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photo credit: Sheila Phalon

My dearest friend Nancy Weber has written a most entertaining and educational article on her visit to me several months ago when I was testing buttercrunch toffee for the new book.

When I learned that Betty Fussell, who also lives in the neighborhood, and is a highly esteemed author and friend, is also a friend of Nancy's, I invited her over to watch the process and taste the results.

Several of you have posted questions about toffee so this is a first rate opportunity to review the key steps. Enjoy! NYCityWoman.com

A Macaronathon™

Dec 20, 2011 | From the kitchen of Rose in Recipes

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Macarons from La Maison du Chocolat, photo credit Pricilla Martel

It has been written recently that the macaron is the cupcake of the year. It seems that America is having a love affair with the French macaron! But I'll bet no one has ever done for cupcakes what my friend and colleague, Priscilla Martel, is doing for American Almonds and macarons: She and a girl friend did a tour of New York bakeries carrying macarons and created this google map complete with beautiful photos and fascinating information about macarons. What a delightful and enviable project.

Here is an invaluable link all about macarons including a recipe and several tips and step-by-step photos.

Priscilla and friend will be adding additional cities/bakeries in the new year.

Cookie Recipes

Nov 10, 2007 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookie

My dear friend and high school classmate June Lebell (those of you in the NY area might know her beautiful voice as former long-time hostess on WQXR) forwarded me this amazing collection of cookies I thought you'd all enjoy. (By the way, June is now living in Sarasota and busy as ever doing restaurant, music and theater reviews, speaking engagements, etc.)

1-2-3 Cookies
7 Layer Cookies
Allie Nelson's Famous Snickerdoodle Cookies
Almond Crescent Shortbread
Amish Sugar Cookies
Andies Candies Cookies
Angel Crisps
Angenets
Applesauce Cookies
Apricot Fold-Overs
Aunt Edy's Molasses Crinkles
Auntie Linda's Ginger Gems
Bakeless Dream Cookies
Banana Drop Cookies
Best Chocolate Chip Cookies in the World
Biscotti
Biscotti
Blueberry Cookies
Boiled Chocolate Oatmeal Drop Cookies
Bronwnies
Brown Sugar Shortbread
Brownie Cookies
Brownie Delight
Brownies
Buccaneer Snowballs
Buried Cherry Cookies
Butter Cookies
Butter Nut Balls
Butterballs
Butterscotch Haystacks
C.O.P. Cookies
Candy Cane Cookies
Candy Cookies
Caramel Shortbread
Cheesecake Brownies
Cherry Buns
Cherry Crowns
Cherry Winks
Chewies
Chewy Noels
Chinese Chews/Haystacks
Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars
Chocolate Chip Cookies
Chocolate Chip Meltaways
Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cookies
Chocolate Christmas Trees
Chocolate Cream Cheese Squares
Chocolate Crinkles
Chocolate Mint Snow-Top Cookies
Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies (no bake)
Chocolate Snowball Cookies
Chocolate Streusel Bars
Chocolate Sundae Cookies
Chocolate Walnut Crumb Bars
Choco-Scotch Crunchies
Choose A Cookie Dough Recipe
Christmas Crackers
Christmas Crunch Bars
Christmas Ginger Snaps
Christmas Macaroons
Christmas Mice Cookies
Christmas Shaped Cookies
Church Window Cookies
Coconut Cookies
Congo Squares
Cookie in a Jar
Corn Flakes Cookies
Cornflake Christmas Wreaths
Cowboy Cookies (oatmeal)
Cream Cheese Cookies with Apricot Filling
Crème De Menthe Chocolate Squares
Crème Wafers
Crescent Cookies
Crispy Crunchies
Date Nut Balls
Date-nut Pinwheel Cookies
Diabetic Peanut Butter Cookies
Disgustingly Rich Brownies
Doodles
Double chocolate chip cookies
Double-Chocolate Crinkles
Eatmore Cookies
Eggnog Cookies
Elizabeth's Sugar Cookies
Elves Quick Fudge Brownies
Emily Dickinson's Gingerbread Cookie Recipe
Emily's Best Brownies
Famous Oatmeal Cookies
Firemen Cookies
Fluffy Shortbread Cookies
Forgotten Cookies
Frosted Peanut Butter Brownies
Fruit Cake Cookies
Fruitcake Squares
Fry Pan Cookies
Gems
Ginger Cookies
Ginger Crinkles
Gingerbread Baby
Gingerbread Cookies with Butter Cream Icing
Gingerbread Men
Gingerbread Men
Ginny's Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies
Glory's Golden Graham Squares
Glory's Sugar Cookies
Gramma Chapman's chocolate coconut drops
Grandma Elsie's Zimt (cinnamon) Cookies
Grandma J's Butter Cookies
Grandma Olson's Parkay Cookies
Great Grandmothers Sugar Cookies
Gum Drop Cookies
Gumdrop Gems
Haystack Cookies
Ho-Ho Bars
Holiday Cereal Snaps
Holiday Chocolate Butter Cookies
Holiday Raisin Walnut Bars
Holly Cookies
Hungarian Cookies (Little Nut Rolls)
Ice Box Cookies
Irresistible Peanut Butter Cookies
Italian Cookies
Jacob's Peppermint Snowballs
Jam Bars
Jessica's Famous Brownies
Jessie's Chocolate Chip Cookies
Jubilee Jumbles
Juliet's Peanut Butter Blossoms
Jumbo Chocolate Chip Cookies
Kentucky Colonels
Kiefle (cream cheese cookies with jam filling)
Kifflings
Kiss Cookies
Lacy Swedish Almond Wafers
Lemon Angel Bar Cookies
Lemon Bars
Lemon Cake Cookies
Lemon Cream Cheese Cookies
Lemon Squares
Linzer Tarts
Log Cabin Cookies
Luscious Lemon Squares
M&M Cookies
Magic Cookie Bars
Melt in Your Mouth Cutout Sugar Cookies
Melting Shortbread
Meme's Cream Cheese Cookies
Milk Chocolate Florentine Cookies
Mincemeat Cookies
Mincemeat Goodies
Molasses Cookies
Molasses Forest Cookies
Molasses Sugar Cookies
Mom Mom's Crescent Cookies
Mom-Mom's Ginger Cookies
Mom's Nutmeg Sugar Cookies
Mom's Old Fashion "Puffy" Sugar Cookies
Monster Cookies
Moravian Christmas Cookies
Nana's Famous Soft Southern Cookies
Nitey Nite Cookies
No Bake Chocolate Cookies
No Bake Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies
No Bake Cookies
No Bake Cookies
No Bake Peanut Butter Cookies
No-Bake Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies
No-Bake Cookies
Norwegian Sugar Cookies
Nut Balls
Oatmeal Bars
Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Nut Cookies
Oatmeal Coconut Crisps
Oatmeal Cookies
Oatmeal Scotchies
Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies
Ooey Gooey Caramel Chocolate Dunk
Ooey Gooey Squares
Orange Slice Cookies
Parking Lot Cookies
Peanut Blossoms
Peanut Butter Bars
Peanut Butter Blossoms
Peanut Butter Cereal Cookies
Peanut Butter Chewies
Peanut Butter Chocolate Bars
Peanut Butter Cookies
Peanut Butter Cookies
Peanut butter fingers
Peanut Butter Reindeer
Peanut Butter Surprises
Peanut Marshmallow Cookies
Pecan Puff Cookies
Peppermint Snowballs
Peppernuts
Persimmon Cookies
Persimmon Cookies
Petey's Yummy Spicy Almond Thins
Pfeffernuesse
Pffefferneuse Cookies
Pineapple Filled Cookies
Pizzelles
Potato Chip Cookies
Potato Flake Cookies
Praline Cookies
Praline Strips
Pterodactyl Nests
Pumpkin Bars
Pumpkin Bars
Pumpkin Chip Cookies
Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies
Pumpkin Cookies
Queen Biscuits
Quick Cookies
Raised Sugar Cookies
Raisin Filled Oatmeal Bars
Raspberry Meringue Bars
Really Peanutty Butter Cookies
Reese`s Brownies
Reese's Peanut Butter Bars
Rich Flavor Christmas Cookies
Rich Lemon Bars
Ricotta Cheese Cookies
Royal Almond Christmas Bars
Rudolph Cinnamon Cookies
Russian Tea Cookies
Russian Teacakes
Samantha & Kelsey's Chocolate Chip Cookies
Sand Art Brownies
Santa Claus Cookie Pops
Santa Claus Cookies
Santa's Butterscotch Melts
Santa's Shorts
Santa's Special Squares
Scotch Cakes
Scotch Shortbread
Scotcharoos
Scotcheroos
Seven Layer Cookies
Short Bread Cookies
Shortbread
Skor Squares
Snicker Doodle Cookies
Snickerdoodles
Snickerdoodles
Snow Balls
Sour Cream Apple Squares
Sour Cream Christmas Cookies
Special K Cookies
Spice Cookies
Spicy Oatmeal Raisin Cookie
Spritz Cookies
Stained Glass Window Cookies
Stir & Drop Sugar Cookies
Sugar Cookies
Sugar Cookies
Sugar Cookies
Swedish Pepparkakor (Pepper Cake) Cookies
Swedish Sugar Cookies
Sweet Marie's
Swiss Treats
Taralle (Italian Cookies)
Tea Time Tassies
Texas Brownies
The Best Shortbread in The World
Thumbprint Cookies Thumbprint Cookies
Toffee Squares
Traditional Christmas Sugar Cookies
Traditional Gingerbread Men Cookies
Triple-Chocolate Chip Cookies
Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookies
Vanilla Waffer Balls
Walnut Butter Cookies
Walnut Crumb Bars
White Chip Chocolate Cookies
Wild Oatmeal Cookies
Will's Famous Apple Jack Cookies
Yummy Yummy Peanut Butter Blossoms

Macaroons

Feb 22, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Questions and Answers

ZACHARY QUESTION

Do you have any experience with Parisian-style macarons? I've been a huge fan of these for years, always visiting Laduree and Stohrer when I'm in Paris. It's been my "life's dream" (in the realm of my baking anyway) to make the macarons as close to French patisserie quality as possible; I've been working on them lately and have had mediocre success. Main problems: many crack and split open while baking. I've tried the approach of letting them sit out for a few minutes before baking and baking immediately and nothing seems to guarantee consistency. I've contacted Laduree (they have a book now, in French!) to ask if I can visit their kitchen, but they didn't like that idea. Do you know of any secrets to these and getting them as tender and as close as possible to the real things?

Thanks! Zach

ROSE REPLY

Macaroons are very difficult to make at home. but I can give you one tip othat was given to me by a Swiss chef: after piping them, let them sit uncovered overnight before baking them. This helps to keep them from cracking, resulting in smooth tops. as Dorie Greenspan says in her delightful book Paris Sweets, each Parisian has his or her favorite place for macaroons. for this New Yorker its Laduree, but then, I have yet to do a thorough tasting investigation.

Cookies without Eggs

Feb 07, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookie Questions

PARITA QUESTION

Feedback: hi rose,
i would like to know that if i can bake cookies without using eggs??? if u have few recipes for cookies without using eggs i would love to try them out.
thanx.

ROSE REPLY

I don't know of the cake that can be made without eggs but many wonderful cookies can be made without them!

Variations to Shortbread

Jan 06, 2006 | From the kitchen of Rose in Ingredients

ANNA QUESTION

I have all of your books and am a huge fan. Your teaching style appeals to me, as I am a university math instructor. One of my favorite recipes is your Shortbread. It needs no improving, but I sometimes would like a little chocolate or nuts with them. Have you ever tried putting mini chocolate chips in the dough or finely chopped pecans?

ROSE REPLY

thank you! I haven't tried putting mini chocolate chips in the dough -- -- as you know, it's a very fragile dough. But I have frosted it with a thin layer of ganache, or tempered chocolate. I haven't tried adding finely chopped pecans but I'm quite sure that would work perfectly. also, the nuts and the chocolate would be terrific together!

Dry Cookies

Dec 22, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookie Questions

BARBARA QUESTION


Feedback: i HAVE A COOKIE THAT BECOMES QQUITE DRY AFTERBAKING AND i WONDERED IF THERE IS ANYTHING I CAN DO TO PREVENT THIS/

ROSE REPLY

cookies usually become dry due to overbaking as they continue baking after removal from the oven. better to underbake as you can always return them to the oven but you can't UNbake! bake the cookies until starting to brown at the edges and set but still soft when pressed in the center. leave them on the cookie sheets just until they are firm enough to remove and then transfer them to racks.
a few spoonfulls of molasses, honey, or corn syrup will also help to keep cookies soft.

Snappy Gingersnaps

Dec 13, 2005 | From the kitchen of Rose in Cookie Questions

Caitlin Question:
I'm having such trouble with gingersnaps and I hope you can help! My goal is a cookie that can last longer than one day while still being "snappy" and still tender to the bite. I can't seem to find the balance between chewy and tooth-breaking!

I've tried increasing baking powder, I've fussed with bake times, stored in sealed bags, I've thrown in desiccant to see what would happen, but still am unhappy with my results.

Rose Reply:
i've never actually made gingersnaps but in my book "rose's christmas cookies" i have both gingerbread for building gingerbread houses and gingerbread for gingerbread people! the difference is that in the people one i use egg, more butter and more brown sugar, all of which makes it more tender though still crisp. if you roll them thicker--say 1/4", they will be more soft, chewy and pudgy!

also be sure to underbake them slightly as on cooling they will firm up but still remain a little soft. these cookies keep for several months but of course become less soft with time.

Rose's Chocolate Baking Essentials on Craftsy

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