Here are five reviews that Rose’s Baking Basics has received from Publisher’s Weekly, ALA’s Booklist Online, Eater, Food & Wine, and Library Journal, and an article in Publisher’s Weekly on our collaboration over the years.

Publisher’s Weekly August 2018
Best Books    Authors

Rose’s Baking Basics
Rose Levy Beranbaum. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $35 (400p) ISBN 978-0-544-81622-0

MORE BY AND ABOUT THIS AUTHOR   Beranbaum (The Cake Bible) offers solid baking guidance in the form of step-by-step photos and detailed written instructions. The precision-minded author instructs readers to measure cupcake batter on a scale for even distribution; and, for the same reason, she suggests (perhaps too exactingly) cutting raisins in half when making rugelach. A list of potential problems and their solutions start each chapter (the cookie chapter, for example, details how not to burn the bottoms), and Beranbaum provides measurements for each recipe in both grams and volume, because she believes weighing ingredients is more reliable. Many of her recipes are straightforward and accessible for bakers of all skill levels. Chapters on cookies, cakes, pies, and tarts overflow with precise steps for American classics: double-crusted apple pie, zucchini bread, and two thumbprint nut cookies with jam. The cookies section includes a recipe for chocolate chip cookies with both browned butter for flavor and golden syrup for chewiness, as well as “brookies,” a cross between a brownie and a cookie. Beranbaum suggests using canola or safflower oil rather than butter for a layered carrot cake so that the layers can tolerate refrigeration once cloaked in cream cheese. She presents a recipe for chocolate-spangled angel food cake (“Not only is it a favorite party cake, it is also an excellent vehicle for any leftover egg whites you might have in the freezer”); for pies, there is an apple galette (“a free form tart that can be used with many fruits or berries”) and a key lime pie, for which she admits to preferring regular limes to key limes. Beranbaum’s hand-holding is invaluable, especially for those apprehensive about baking. (Sept.)

 

American Library Association 
Booklist Online: The best book reviews for public libraries and school libraries, and the best books to read for your book club, brought to you by the ALA.

Booklist includes a very positive review for Rose Levy Beranbaum’s ROSE’S BAKING BASICS in their 9/1/18 issue.

“Beranbaum, author of the classic The Cake Bible (1988), tailors her detailed approach to baking for beginners, with plenty for advanced bakers to benefit from, too. To prepare for the worst without fear, she begins each section (“Cookies,” “Cakes,” “Pies and Tarts,” “Breads,” “Toppings and Fillings”) with a page or two of “Solutions for Possible Problems.” Recipes lead with preheating notes and a very helpful “mise en place” list that explains what to do before even beginning, such as getting ingredients to room temperature. Most recipes include “Baking Pearls,” special notes about working with specific ingredients or tools. Beranbaum does not recommend attempting substitutions on a whim, but she shares tested variations, where applicable. Hundreds of color photographs include both dazzling finished products and a wealth of step-by-step process depictions, such as forming rolled cookies or baking cheesecake and carefully removing it from its pan. With bolstering instructions and heavily tested, highly appealing recipes, this is sure to be a new favorite.”—Annie Bostrom

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ROSE’S BAKING BASICS received a starred review in the 9/15 issue of Library Journal.

 

“This newest addition from award-winning author Beranbaum (The Bread Bible and The Cake Bible; realbakingwithrose.com) features several foolproof recipes for common baked goods such as layer and sheet cakes, cookies, cupcakes, tarts, breads, pies, and more. Instructions for creating related toppings and fillings such as classic ganache, along with solutions for problems during the baking process, will help guide new bakers to create treats such as basic chocolate cupcakes, apple cinnamon coffee cake, and butter biscuits. Lavish step-by-step photographs and storing information accompany each recipe. A highlight is the straightforward measurements, offered in both metric and standard, and easy-to-follow instructions. The introduction lists essential baking equipment used throughout. While there are some precise techniques, such as piping, the author's conversational advice makes these options less intimidating. VERDICT Similar to her previous works, Beranbaum's latest is destined to be popular among home bakers of all skill levels.”-- Stephanie Sendaula

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LOS ANGELAS TIMES 10 cookbooks to give and get this holiday season Nov. 2 by Amy Scattergood

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From left: “Milk Street: Tuesday Nights” by Christopher Kimball; “Rose’s Baking Basics” by Rose Levy Beranbaum; “Bestia: Italian Recipes Created in the Heart of L.A.” by Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis with Lesley Suter (Little, Brown and Company; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Ten Speed Press)

Cookbooks are some of the best gifts you can give your food-minded friends and relatives because they’re easy to find, simple to wrap — and can often trigger reciprocal dinner invitations. Among this year’s wealth of cookbooks are a few excellent baking books, some new books from award-winning folks whose other books might already be on your shelves, and two debut books from Los Angeles chefs. Here are 10 new cookbooks to put on your gift list.

“Rose’s Baking Basics” by Rose Levy Beranbaum (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $35)

Do you (or whomever you’re gifting) need another of Beranbaum’s baking books? You really do. This one, her 11th, features 100 recipes for the essential stuff: cookies, cakes, pies, tarts and breads along with toppings and fillings. What makes this book particularly useful is all the photos — 600 of them, apparently — often in step-by-step sequence. All these pictures are pretty, yes, but also practical because baking is so often somewhat intangible without visual aids. They also offer pretty good incentive because there’s nothing like more than 300 pages of pictures of cupcakes, brownies, rugelach, chocolate rolls, lemon and blueberry tarts, and babka to make you want to start baking.